General Etiquette > Techno-quette

Linkedin newbie

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veronaz:
LinkedIn can also be used by rejected lovers, stalkers, and collection agencies to find out where a person works.

Cat-Fu:

--- Quote from: veronaz on August 28, 2013, 10:23:53 PM ---LinkedIn can also be used by rejected lovers, stalkers, and collection agencies to find out where a person works.

--- End quote ---

LinkedIn does have privacy protections to help prevent things like that...

veronaz:

--- Quote from: Cat-Fu on August 30, 2013, 12:44:29 PM ---
--- Quote from: veronaz on August 28, 2013, 10:23:53 PM ---LinkedIn can also be used by rejected lovers, stalkers, and collection agencies to find out where a person works.

--- End quote ---

LinkedIn does have privacy protections to help prevent things like that...

--- End quote ---

There is still a problem:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/justinesharrock/linkedin-has-a-stalker-problem

They need to improve their "privacy" protections.  As mentioned in this article, you can't block individual users and you can limit views to people in your network.  If you type in a person's name on google and they use LinkedIn, there is a good chance you can find out information about them

Cat-Fu:
I agree that LinkedIn needs a block option, but it is really easy to block yourself from search engines and choose not to have a public profile (as it notes in the article you just linked).

TBH, though, I'm not sure what stalkers have to do with the etiquette of LinkedIn.

TootsNYC:
I don't use LinkedIn that much, mostly because I think people overreach and use the wrong standard.
A common problem in etiquette is when people confuse social with business. And they insist that coworkers go out for drinks; or they feel they'd be rude to switch dentists or hairdressers.

LinkedIn reflects some of that confusion. The aforementioned endorsement of my [work duty] skills by someone I went to high school with; she knows where I've worked, but she's never, ever seen me do my job. And in fact, though it's not "rude," I think her endorsement *is* a "bad form" etiquette violation.

I've written recommendations for other people--like my real-life recommendations, they're pretty detailed and specific, therefore long. I think they're pretty convincing, and I think the chances are good that *if* someone was on the fence about a hire, my words would tip them over into choosing my colleague.

I won't "link" with relatives or friends. I keep it for colleagues I've worked with only. I won't link with people who've applied to me for freelance work but *haven't* been hired.  Basically, if I know you well enough that I'd be happy to answer Q's for you about a place you think you might want to work, or would be glad to call a friend on your behalf for info or to say, "he's really pleasant to work with, and when we worked together, I always found him helpful, even though I didn't see his work day-to-day close"? Then I'll link.

Partly that's because I just don't want to get into a far-flung web of connections. I don't want to do those sorts of things for just anybody--I don't have time.

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