Author Topic: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.  (Read 14304 times)

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Winterlight

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #60 on: August 30, 2013, 09:29:53 AM »
I would rather regret calling an ambulance than regret not calling one.

This!

I once called the fire department over a suspected carbon monoxide leak that turned out to be nothing. I was embarrassed, but the firefighter pointed out that it was much better to be alive and feel a little silly than to feel nothing at all because you're dead. He had a point!
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veronaz

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #61 on: August 30, 2013, 11:34:48 AM »
Quote
Is it possible that the OP may be looking for responses to arm herself with because relative may be wanting the OP to reimburse her for the ambulance bill?

Himself.  (OP is a male :) )
I suppose that’s possible, but OP didn’t say anything about relative wanting him to pay.  I just replied based on the information provided.  The concern was that other people might say something, not concern about being asked to pay.  At least not yet.

Quote
I would rather regret calling an ambulance than regret not calling one.

I completely agree with this.

Just a general question:  Why so much debate about calling and ambulance/not calling an ambulance?  ???  Have a lot of people had insurance claims for ambulance services denied, or perhaps no health insurance?  Or maybe a lot od people had had an experience where someone called an ambulance against their wishes? 
« Last Edit: August 30, 2013, 11:39:18 AM by veronaz »

o_gal

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #62 on: August 30, 2013, 11:41:46 AM »
Just a general question:  Why so much debate about calling and ambulance/not calling an ambulance?  ???  Have a lot of people had insurance claims for ambulance services denied, or perhaps no health insurance?

Insurance denying ambulance claims is unfortunately a common practice in the US. I googled it and there's even an eHow article that lists why it might happen.

HorseFreak

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #63 on: August 30, 2013, 12:17:42 PM »
Quote
Is it possible that the OP may be looking for responses to arm herself with because relative may be wanting the OP to reimburse her for the ambulance bill?

Himself.  (OP is a male :) )
I suppose thatís possible, but OP didnít say anything about relative wanting him to pay.  I just replied based on the information provided.  The concern was that other people might say something, not concern about being asked to pay.  At least not yet.

Quote
I would rather regret calling an ambulance than regret not calling one.

I completely agree with this.

Just a general question:  Why so much debate about calling and ambulance/not calling an ambulance?  ???  Have a lot of people had insurance claims for ambulance services denied, or perhaps no health insurance?  Or maybe a lot od people had had an experience where someone called an ambulance against their wishes? 


My insurance left me with a $350 bill for an ambulance ride thanks to deductibles and copays.

WillyNilly

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #64 on: August 30, 2013, 01:16:07 PM »
Just a general question:  Why so much debate about calling and ambulance/not calling an ambulance?  ???  Have a lot of people had insurance claims for ambulance services denied, or perhaps no health insurance?  Or maybe a lot od people had had an experience where someone called an ambulance against their wishes?

Many people do not have adequate insurance to cover an ambulance or their deductible in in the thousands and wouldn't cover it. I have never known some one to take a 911 ambulance for free (volunteer ambulances, yes those can be free, but not 911). And the cost of a 911 ambulance is generally over $500, sometimes into the thousands.

Which is why in my earlier post I said I'm often not an advocate of calling an ambulance. Many issues can be dealt with without one (at least in my city, where an ER is generally 10 minutes or less away). The situation in the OP though? No that was a call situation without question or hesitation IMO - even if I was only 10 minutes from the hospital. The ambulance can not only start treatment, but they can contact the hospital en-route and have staff ready to immediately take over without having to triage and hold up treatment.

CuriousParty

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #65 on: August 30, 2013, 02:04:04 PM »
As a PP said, though, costs vary widely. DD needed an ambulance once and we were not billed. The county she was in provides ambulance services along with fire and police as necessary for public safety and health.

Sharnita

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #66 on: August 30, 2013, 02:44:24 PM »
It can also depend on circumstances. If I was in a car accident in front of my home it should be covered thanks to Michigan's car insurance. If something happened to me on the lawn, it cpyld be another story because it would be my health insurance.

jaxsue

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #67 on: August 30, 2013, 03:04:21 PM »
Just a general question:  Why so much debate about calling and ambulance/not calling an ambulance?  ???  Have a lot of people had insurance claims for ambulance services denied, or perhaps no health insurance?

Insurance denying ambulance claims is unfortunately a common practice in the US. I googled it and there's even an eHow article that lists why it might happen.

True, unfortunately. I was lucky in that my carrier paid part of my $800 ambulance ride last January. My town pays whatever the insurance carrier does not. So I paid $0.

ladyknight1

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #68 on: August 30, 2013, 06:30:23 PM »
You dd the right thing. I'm sorry you are getting grief for it.

ladyknight1

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #69 on: August 30, 2013, 06:43:11 PM »
OP, I'm not understanding why you feel you have to "arm yourself" (so to speak) with justification and explanations about why you felt was a wise, safe decision regarding someone's health/medical problem.

If someone makes a comment:
"That's a strange comment/question.  I felt it was the right thing to do.  I don't see how it affects you."

Beyond that I wouldn't discuss it.  At all.
Is it possible that the OP may be looking for responses to arm herself with because relative may be wanting the OP to reimburse her for the ambulance bill?

This was my first thought too. It does raise an interesting question - who is responsible for the ambulance bill? The person taken ill, or the person who called? And what if the person taken ill believes that the ambulance was unnecessary?

FWIW, I believe that the person taken ill should pay. Amd in this case, it does seem like the ambulance was definitely necessary! If your relative (or her sympathisers) request that you pay the bill, you are definitely not rude for refusing.

I could be wrong but I believe that if the EMT determine the person does not need medical services that no one is billed for an ambulance ride but the person who called may be billed a false report (false as in incorrect not false as in a lie, similar to oversensitive building alarm that the police keep going out to.)  I am almost positive policies vary by county/township/city. I have a vague recollection that that the township my mother lived in didn't charge anyone for the first time an ambulance was called whether the person was given treatment, went to the hospital or it was decided absolutely no help was needed.

This may be true in some areas, but not in the US. It is considered part of the Good Samaritan Laws in each state. http://www.heartsafeam.com/pages/faq_good_samaritan Most first aid courses will cover what is protected by law.

DH and I are both wilderness first aid trained, but we only carry epinephrine injectors when accompanying a group on a hike or trek with someone with known allergies. They have to be prescribed for a particular person and we are not doctors.

jpcher

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #70 on: August 30, 2013, 07:44:43 PM »
I haven't read the entire thread, but I think that this is the best answer to give if you're asked about the situation:

'I don't have medical training, but the people at 911 do.  That's why we're supposed to call them when we don't know what to do.  They sent the ambulance, and the responders decided what was best for her.'


snappylt

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #71 on: August 30, 2013, 08:16:37 PM »
OP here again.  Thank you, everyone, for your replies.  I now have some ideas ready just in case anyone tries to start an argument at the family get-together this weekend.

As I said in my OP, nobody has criticized me about the 911 call yet.  I just wanted to be ready, in case anyone brings up the bill and tells me I should have used my own car.  (One of my personal characteristics is that sometimes, if I am criticized unexpectedly, I freeze up.  Later on I think of all sorts of things I could have said.)  In this particular case, I am sure I did the reasonably prudent thing by calling the ambulance, so I want to be ready -and not freeze up- if any of the relatives fuss at me.

And I hope that our relatives take the high road and do not make a fuss!  (I just wanted to be ready if they do.)

Thank you again, all.

GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #72 on: August 30, 2013, 08:31:17 PM »
Not trying to answer for the OP or anything, but even if it's a 35 minute ambulance ride, I'd probably feel better knowing the relative is in the ambulance instead of my car, because at least in an ambulance they have access to more medical equipment/medicine in case her condition worsens - 35 minutes in an ambulance sounds more comfortable and safer than in my car, personally.

This.  So much this.  In an ambulance, the paramedics are right there and have access to the equipment and skills it would take to keep your relative alive and stable til the hospital.  If she had a full-blown reaction in your car, (assuming of course Snappy has no medical training) what could you have done? 

If I had been in your relative's shoes and you had called 911 f or me, I would have been very grateful and never said boo about the bill.
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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #73 on: August 30, 2013, 08:43:41 PM »
OP, I have a problem with freezing up too. To give yourself a moment for the good phrases to come to mind, would saying "Excuse me?" in a confused way help you get started?

HoneyBee42

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Re: Being prepared to deflect criticism about an ambulance ride.
« Reply #74 on: August 30, 2013, 10:39:42 PM »
Just a general question:  Why so much debate about calling and ambulance/not calling an ambulance?  ???  Have a lot of people had insurance claims for ambulance services denied, or perhaps no health insurance?

Insurance denying ambulance claims is unfortunately a common practice in the US. I googled it and there's even an eHow article that lists why it might happen.

True, unfortunately. I was lucky in that my carrier paid part of my $800 ambulance ride last January. My town pays whatever the insurance carrier does not. So I paid $0.

It's very true--my dad was once in a bike accident ... fortunately, he was wearing a helmet, but he did an end-over-end thing where the first point of impact was the top of his head.  A passing motorist called 911, and when the police arrived, dad was unconscious.  The officer called for "next available ambulance" and one came and took my dad to the ER.  (He didn't regain consciousness until he was in the ER).  The ins company tried to pay as "out of network ambulance" (which was 50% of the charges) until they appealed as it turned out there were *no* "in network" ambulances, and so it ended up being paid at 100%.  But that was a good insurance that still tried to weasel out of paying (not to mention the whole silly idea that the cop would've said "oh, and be sure 'next available' is company Y and not company X" or send away the company Y ambulance).

Dad ended up being fine afterwards, but his helmet became a very excellent object lesson as to why one *always* should wear a helmet when cycling.  The outer plastic was shattered and that inner foam was compressed to paper thinness.