Author Topic: Baseball caps in an interview  (Read 9967 times)

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Cami

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #60 on: September 16, 2013, 06:27:45 PM »
Perhaps that's the point, to throw the interviewer out of his/her comfort zone.  We're used to a certain "look" at a corporate interview, and a baseball cap obviously is different.  Maybe the aim is to see who doesn't get flustered by it.
I can't stand mind games like that.  I wouldn't get flustered, but I wouldn't think too highly of the interviewer.

My dh once did an interview in which they put a huge jar of jelly beans in front of each candidate. He was offered the job and asked what the deal was with the jelly bean jar, at which point the HR person laughed and said that department used the jelly bean "test" to determine which candidate to hire. He turned the job down based on that because (1) he thought the test was stupid and (2) loathes playing "games" to make important decisions and didn't want to be part of that environment. He knew the person who did take the job and he ended up leaving because they were always having these inane "tests" sprung on them that counted more in their reviews than their actual work.

What was the test ?  how did you pass the jelly bean quiz?
FTR, the test had nothing to do with colors of the jellybeans.  The test was to see how you reacted to the jar of food items. Do you move it? Do you leave it? If you move it, to where do you move it? Do you ask a question about it? Do you take jellybeans? Do you offer the jellybean jar to others?

I'd probably just ignore it, which would probably disqualify me in some mysterious way, thus dodging the bullet.  ;D
Me too , unless it was so large it blocked my view of the people I was speaking to.
IIRC, my dh moved the jar to one side, while asking if anyone else wanted it. When someone said they did, he got up and walked it down to that person. Apparently that was the "DINGDINGDING, we have a winnah!" response.

BigBadBetty

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #61 on: September 16, 2013, 07:34:14 PM »
I work in an IT department. Baseball caps are very common among men here. It rare to see anything dressier than a polo shirt and khaki pants. I would suggest that anyone offended by baseball caps stay out of IT except maybe in super-corporate environments.

artk2002

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #62 on: September 17, 2013, 11:42:54 AM »
I work in an IT department. Baseball caps are very common among men here. It rare to see anything dressier than a polo shirt and khaki pants. I would suggest that anyone offended by baseball caps stay out of IT except maybe in super-corporate environments.

For me, the first point is that hats, on men, are not appropriate indoors at all. Baseball, fedora, top hat, cowboy or fez. My second point is that an interview is a more formal occasion than day-to-day work. The candidate is expected to go to extra effort to look good and it's incumbent on the interviewers to do the same.

I work in IT. My normal working outfit is shorts and a t-shirt. If I'm doing an interview, you can bet that I change my clothing, out of respect for the candidate.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

Goosey

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #63 on: September 17, 2013, 11:49:42 AM »
I think at some point overarching etiqutte rules are supposed to be ignored depending on a few things. For instance, I don't really care too much about etiquette when I am hanging out with a close friend or my husband.

For me, in this instance, the etiquette of "NO HATS EVEEER!" is to be brushed aside for corporate environments. If the corporate environment is one that allows hats, then it is not rude or insulting for anyone - man or woman - to wear a hat indoors.

From the outfit (matching hat & shirt), I agree with others who said that it sounds like he was going to some kind of promotional event. In this case, it is best think of this individual as "in uniform" rather than as being insulting.

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The candidate is expected to go to extra effort to look good and it's incumbent on the interviewers to do the same.

I completely disagree, Art. The only person there who needs to make the BEST impression is the interviewee. The interviewers represent the company and their culture and would be MISrepresenting the culture to do otherwise. If someone is going to be insulted by employees wearing hats indoors, it's best that they know that it's a normal practice at this company before they are hired on and surprised.

wolfie

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #64 on: September 17, 2013, 11:57:03 AM »
I completely disagree, Art. The only person there who needs to make the BEST impression is the interviewee. The interviewers represent the company and their culture and would be MISrepresenting the culture to do otherwise. If someone is going to be insulted by employees wearing hats indoors, it's best that they know that it's a normal practice at this company before they are hired on and surprised.
Using that logic the person being interviewed should not be in his best behavior either because he is misrepresenting himself if he does otherwise. Interviewing is a two way street. The interviewer to see if he wants that person as an employee, the interviewee to see if he wants to work there. Both people should be putting their best foot forward. It's kinda like a first date - if this is how someone acts when they want to impress you, how are they going to act once the shine wears off?

Goosey

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #65 on: September 17, 2013, 12:03:42 PM »
I completely disagree, Art. The only person there who needs to make the BEST impression is the interviewee. The interviewers represent the company and their culture and would be MISrepresenting the culture to do otherwise. If someone is going to be insulted by employees wearing hats indoors, it's best that they know that it's a normal practice at this company before they are hired on and surprised.
Using that logic the person being interviewed should not be in his best behavior either because he is misrepresenting himself if he does otherwise. Interviewing is a two way street. The interviewer to see if he wants that person as an employee, the interviewee to see if he wants to work there. Both people should be putting their best foot forward. It's kinda like a first date - if this is how someone acts when they want to impress you, how are they going to act once the shine wears off?

For many people, a casual work environment WOULD be their best foot forward. So, just because they don't represent YOUR standards of best they could be, doesn't mean they aren't representing what they are selling. It's the same way with interviewees.

wolfie

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #66 on: September 17, 2013, 12:11:43 PM »
I completely disagree, Art. The only person there who needs to make the BEST impression is the interviewee. The interviewers represent the company and their culture and would be MISrepresenting the culture to do otherwise. If someone is going to be insulted by employees wearing hats indoors, it's best that they know that it's a normal practice at this company before they are hired on and surprised.
Using that logic the person being interviewed should not be in his best behavior either because he is misrepresenting himself if he does otherwise. Interviewing is a two way street. The interviewer to see if he wants that person as an employee, the interviewee to see if he wants to work there. Both people should be putting their best foot forward. It's kinda like a first date - if this is how someone acts when they want to impress you, how are they going to act once the shine wears off?

For many people, a casual work environment WOULD be their best foot forward. So, just because they don't represent YOUR standards of best they could be, doesn't mean they aren't representing what they are selling. It's the same way with interviewees.

Sure - I work in a causal work environment too - I come to work in jeans and shirts all the time and wouldn't want to go back to a work environment where I need to dress up. But that doesn't mean that I am going to go to an interview in jeans and a tshirt - I am still going to dress up to show my respect for the company I am interviewing with. I don't think it is unreasonable for me to expect them to show me the same respect. I can see what the culture is like when I am walking through the office and seeing the other people there.

To be honest I am not sure what you were trying to say with the above post, besides trying to look down on me based on your assumptions of what I consider best behavior to be.

Goosey

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #67 on: September 17, 2013, 12:12:58 PM »
I think we'll have to agree to disagree. I wouldn't expect my interviewers to dress outside of their company culture to interview me. I wouldn't even want them to!

Mrs. Tilney

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #68 on: September 17, 2013, 01:04:14 PM »
Also, there have been times when people are called to sit in on interviews without necessarily having much, if any, notice. The interview may not have been on this man's calendar that morning.

White Lotus

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #69 on: September 17, 2013, 10:11:53 PM »
I will cut a pass for uniform hats required to be worn indoors or in transition areas for outdoor workers.  The etiquette rule remains that the hat comes off a man's head indoors.  Women wear head coverings as part of their outfits, as wardrobe -- men don't.  A man who wants to cover his head for medical reasons has other choices -- it is still a violation of the etiquette rule, but might get a pass.  It just doesn't have to be one of those stupid ball caps.  Pork pie, news agent, fedora, pirate scarf, biker bandanna -- just not those ugly ball caps.  I have seen Orthodox Jewish men, for reasons best known only to them, since a yarmulke is an exception to the rule, wearing other hats indoors, which I found ill-mannered until I found out they were covering yarmulkes, and then I could consider them yarmulke-equivalents.  At least they weren't wearing ball caps.
But I still stick to my guns about the etiquette rule generally.  That has not changed.

LadyJaneinMD

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #70 on: September 18, 2013, 08:57:43 AM »
I work in an IT department. Baseball caps are very common among men here. It rare to see anything dressier than a polo shirt and khaki pants. I would suggest that anyone offended by baseball caps stay out of IT except maybe in super-corporate environments.

As far as I'm concerned, the interviewer can wear anything he/she wants. I'm trying to get a job in his/her company. I'm not going to judge anyone by their outfit, and hopefully I won't be judged because I refuse to wear a suit/skirt with heels.   
So far it's worked.     And I'm in IT also. 

DavidH

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #71 on: September 18, 2013, 11:53:38 AM »
I think the etiquette rule is reasonably clear, and the hat in what I'm assuming was not a lobby or public elevator is rude.  Being offended it is fine, since who am I to tell you how to feel, but you need to decide if it's a deal breaker or not regarding a job.  For me, it wouldn't be.  On the other hand, if you are very offended by it, working with this person on a regular basis, hat and all, will only make things worse, so the job is probably not a good fit. 

I understand that there could be reasons  to wear a hat indoors, but things such as "I like the way it looks" or "I don't want you to see that I'm bald" don't change whether it's rude or not.  A religious reason or a poorly thought out uniform that requires it are entirely different.


mbbored

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #72 on: September 21, 2013, 11:47:31 PM »
Oh--re: the cap

We can invent all sorts of reasons for a baseball cap. It may just be because he could get away with it. And it might be very inappropriate attire.

But I reserve the word "offended" for pretty personal and "deliberately pointed at me" stuff.

For me to get offended, I'd have to believe that this guy was deliberately wearing his baseball cap AT me. Hard for me to take that seriously. And since it would have nothing to do with me, and probably nothing to do with how seriously he wanted to recruit me, and everything to do with the fact that he likes to wear a baseball cap, I wouldn't be *offended.*

I completely agree. If you don't want to be around men who wear baseball hats indoors, don't accept a job if they were a baseball hat at the interview. And if they do, in no way shape or form should it be taken as a personal offense.

pixel dust

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Re: Baseball caps in an interview
« Reply #73 on: September 23, 2013, 11:18:01 AM »
I'll admit - the president/owner of my company has interviewed in a baseball cap before. That's his normal "work uniform" though. We're in a very laid back office - jeans and t-shirts (clean and neat) are the normal clothing worn here. Several people have visible tattoos and my own hair is bright magenta.

I think it really just depends on your office environment. We work in music so our clients are normally a laid back, eccentric bunch. In other office environments I understand that the office dress code is more professional and baseball caps, t-shirts, and jeans (not to mention non-natural hair colors and visible tattoos) wouldn't be acceptable.

When it comes down to it, if you're uncomfortable with an office culture that's casual enough that the owner/interviewer wears a baseball cap (has visible tattoos, wears jeans and a t-shirt, etc.) then you can turn down the job. If the interviewer was allowed to come into work that day wearing what they're wearing and interview you, then obviously it's an appropriate work uniform for that particular job/office. I wouldn't call it rude, it's just a different, more relaxed office culture.

Honestly, I love my casual office. During the summer I wear flip-flops everyday, over the past 5 months I'd dyed my hair various colors and, as I mentioned before, currently have bright magenta hair. My boss loves it. BUT - our office is extremely casual. If I ever changed jobs, I'd go back to my natural hair color and wear more professional, conservative clothing until I got a handle on what the new office's culture was like.