Author Topic: Types of houses  (Read 5947 times)

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jilly

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2013, 09:35:44 AM »
Duplexes in the US can be split either horizontally or vertically. I live in a duplex--I have the entire second floor, plus a laundry room and storage area in the basement.

The house next door to mine is also a duplex, but split vertically.

In and around Boston, there are tri-plexes. I have no idea what the correct name for them is, as everyone just calls them "triple deckers." They are a three-family home with each "house" being one complete floor of the building.



In the UK these would be a masionette, a flat would have a shared front door, an apartment would be an upmarket flat. I have also seen a split level maisonette which was the top two floors of a three storey building with a private entrance.

camlan

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2013, 09:40:35 AM »
Duplexes in the US can be split either horizontally or vertically. I live in a duplex--I have the entire second floor, plus a laundry room and storage area in the basement.

The house next door to mine is also a duplex, but split vertically.

In and around Boston, there are tri-plexes. I have no idea what the correct name for them is, as everyone just calls them "triple deckers." They are a three-family home with each "house" being one complete floor of the building.



In the UK these would be a masionette, a flat would have a shared front door, an apartment would be an upmarket flat. I have also seen a split level maisonette which was the top two floors of a three storey building with a private entrance.

Thank you so much! I now know what Agatha Christie and many other writers of her era were talking about when they describe someone as living in a "masionette." It was clear it wasn't a stand-alone house, but I had no idea what it was exactly.
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Thipu1

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2013, 10:55:18 AM »
Maisonette also applies to semi-detached homes in the Midwest of the USA.  We have friends who live on Maisonette Street in Lansing, Michigan.   

In Brooklyn, these side-by-side homes who share a common wall are called semi-detached.  The open side usually has a driveway leading to a garage in the rear.  Most of these were built in the 1920s.

K_Bear

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2013, 12:24:45 PM »
Single family home. I grew up in one.

Duplex or twin or "Father-Daughter" houses (I heard this term while living in one in Lancaster, PA.). I have heard semi-detached for 2, 3, or 4 houses connected. A short row of homes connected.

And a row of connected either a rowhouse/home or townhouse. To me a rowhouse are the old, very narrow connected rows of homes in a city/town. I lived in one that is 100 years old and 13 feet wide for 15 years. I currently own a modern townhouse condo, only 12 years old. With a garage on the ground level floor. Much wider, modern, open, quieter, and more private than the rowhouse.

WillyNilly

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2013, 04:26:19 PM »
Maisonette also applies to semi-detached homes in the Midwest of the USA.  We have friends who live on Maisonette Street in Lansing, Michigan.   

In Brooklyn, these side-by-side homes who share a common wall are called semi-detached.  The open side usually has a driveway leading to a garage in the rear.  Most of these were built in the 1920s.

Hahahaha! In Queens we call them "attached" or "semi-attached" instead of detached.

jedikaiti

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2013, 04:38:14 PM »
I've heard townhomes and rowhouses used interchangeably. Usually no yard, but perhaps a little bit of fenced-in private space in back.

If it's one house split into 2 separate residences, or 2 houses with a common wall, I think of those as "duplexes".

I've lived in a "foursquare" - it's like 4 rowhomes, but in a square, rather than a row. Ours was something like this:

  __________
  |        |         |            Each unit had a "front door" on one side (Where the D's are in the pic).
D|        |         | D        The other exterior wall had a door and patio with access to our yard.
  |---------------|            I think the neighbors in back each had their own, but we shared the "front" yard
D|        |         | D        with the front neighbors.
  |____|_____|

Parking Area

      Road


In New Orleans, some folks have a "double shotgun" - it's a duplex in the shotgun house style. I think of a "single family home" as one that is fully detached from all residences, and typically has at least a token yard, but in my house hunting I've seen plenty of condos (like an apartment, but you own instead of renting) referred to as "single family homes".
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hobish

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #21 on: September 03, 2013, 04:53:21 PM »
There can be a slightly different meaning for some of the terms that have been discussed.

In Brooklyn, a duplex refers to an apartment with two floors and an interior stairway.

'Terrace houses' here are 'row houses'. The most common sort around here is the brownstone although these are also made of brick or limestone.  Some are single family homes and others are divided into apartments. These date from the later 19th or early 20th century.

We also have co-ops and condos.  These are usually in larger apartment buildings.  In a condominium, the occupant has purchased the physical apartment and can often make (legal) alterations to the space or sell it without approval from the board.

A co-op is a bit different.  Instead of buying the physical space, the occupant buys shares allocated to a specific apartment.  The size of the apartment decides the number of shares.  This means that the occupants of larger apartment have a little more say in things than the occupants of smaller apartments. In a co-op, occupants must clear renovations with a board elected from the occupants.  Also, if a resident decides to move, the new buyer must be approved by the board.

This. Condos and co-ops denote a form of ownership, not a style of home. A home can be a condo and be a townhouse, which is something I get to explain to people who should know better at least once a week.

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shhh its me

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #22 on: September 03, 2013, 05:46:27 PM »
There can be a slightly different meaning for some of the terms that have been discussed.

In Brooklyn, a duplex refers to an apartment with two floors and an interior stairway.

'Terrace houses' here are 'row houses'. The most common sort around here is the brownstone although these are also made of brick or limestone.  Some are single family homes and others are divided into apartments. These date from the later 19th or early 20th century.

We also have co-ops and condos.  These are usually in larger apartment buildings.  In a condominium, the occupant has purchased the physical apartment and can often make (legal) alterations to the space or sell it without approval from the board.

A co-op is a bit different.  Instead of buying the physical space, the occupant buys shares allocated to a specific apartment.  The size of the apartment decides the number of shares.  This means that the occupants of larger apartment have a little more say in things than the occupants of smaller apartments. In a co-op, occupants must clear renovations with a board elected from the occupants.  Also, if a resident decides to move, the new buyer must be approved by the board.

This. Condos and co-ops denote a form of ownership, not a style of home. A home can be a condo and be a townhouse, which is something I get to explain to people who should know better at least once a week.

A completely detached home can be a condo.  There are everything from "Air space condos"* you own the paint and the air space enclosed y the walls but not the actual walls* to "site condos" * you own everything but the land your condo is on* and possible more that I'm not aware of.  And condos  can have a deed clause needed approve purchasers as well and/or ban renters.

In my area the top bottom homes are called 2 family and side by side with a shared wall are called duplexes.  About 1/2 the time each side of a duplex is owned by separate people I have never seen a 2 family homes upper/lower owned by 2 people.  There are condos built as uppers and lowers though.

One tv apartment I wondered about is the one from "Everybody hates Chris" the family talks about go upstairs but it looked like they went to the buildings public hallway then upstairs to their bedrooms?  have I just been perceiving  that wrong?

hobish

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #23 on: September 03, 2013, 06:04:41 PM »

^^^ Oh, those, too; but people don't seem to want to argue about them as much. Any condo is a form of ownership; it has nothing to do with the kind of house it is. For some reason, though, we hear a lot of, "It's not a condo, it's a duplex!"  :D
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Thipu1

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2013, 07:27:59 PM »

^^^ Oh, those, too; but people don't seem to want to argue about them as much. Any condo is a form of ownership; it has nothing to do with the kind of house it is. For some reason, though, we hear a lot of, "It's not a condo, it's a duplex!"  :D

Where do you live?  Here, I have never heard of a condo that is a detached, single family home. They're always apartments. 

Also, I've never heard a two story building divided into two apartments called a duplex.  If there's one apartment on each floor, they're called 'floor-throughs'.

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rosegirl

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2013, 07:40:45 PM »
Canada here.  Detached, semi-detached, townhomes would be our terminology.  Duplex might be used but it is often more for a house that is split horizontally, rather than vertically.  So the ground floor is one unit and the upstairs is another.

There is also another type of home here called 'linked'.  These homes share a foundation but not walls.  Or if they share a wall, it is a garage wall, not a living space wall.  It is almost a cross between detached and semi-detached.  They are sometimes done to fit more homes into a neighbourhood that they are able to charge more for because they don't share walls but they are cheaper because the foundations aren't completely separate so there is less back filling to do.

That's a bit misleading. I don't know what part of Canada you're in, but I'm guessing Ontario? There's a very big chunk of Canada that calls them duplexes, regardless of how they're split.

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2013, 07:41:19 PM »
I think hobish is trying to say that the people she works with should know that a condo is a type of ownership and a duplex is a type of home.  They don't mean the same thing although can can be used to describe the same home.

shhh its me

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2013, 07:56:03 PM »
I think hobish is trying to say that the people she works with should know that a condo is a type of ownership and a duplex is a type of home.  They don't mean the same thing although can can be used to describe the same home.

I was just added a few other ways people get confused.   

hobish

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2013, 08:00:19 PM »
I think hobish is trying to say that the people she works with should know that a condo is a type of ownership and a duplex is a type of home.  They don't mean the same thing although can can be used to describe the same home.

I was just added a few other ways people get confused.

Right. I didn't mean to make it more so! :)

I am in New Jersey, but work for a national company. Single family homes can sometimes be condos, they are not common except in Michigan and more recently in California. It's just that a lot of people assume connected housing = condo and it isn't really the case. I hope that makes more sense.
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2013, 08:13:26 PM »
I used to live in a condo townhouse, as opposed to a freehold townhouse.  The advantages were that the buy in price was less, but you had to pay monthly condo fees and you didn't own the land the house was on.  If the condo board was good and proactive, it was great.  If it wasn't, not so much.
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