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Types of houses

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Snooks:
Diane - any silver lining in the fact it's not a back to back?

Hmmmmm:

--- Quote from: Outdoor Girl on September 01, 2013, 03:21:16 PM ---Canada here.  Detached, semi-detached, townhomes would be our terminology.  Duplex might be used but it is often more for a house that is split horizontally, rather than vertically.  So the ground floor is one unit and the upstairs is another.

There is also another type of home here called 'linked'.  These homes share a foundation but not walls.  Or if they share a wall, it is a garage wall, not a living space wall.  It is almost a cross between detached and semi-detached.  They are sometimes done to fit more homes into a neighbourhood that they are able to charge more for because they don't share walls but they are cheaper because the foundations aren't completely separate so there is less back filling to do.

--- End quote ---

In Texas, we have the same definitions. The only other is condo. Here a town home means you own the land that the structure is built on. Condo means you don't own the land.

I've never heard of a linked house. That is interesting.

camlan:
Duplexes in the US can be split either horizontally or vertically. I live in a duplex--I have the entire second floor, plus a laundry room and storage area in the basement.

The house next door to mine is also a duplex, but split vertically.

In and around Boston, there are tri-plexes. I have no idea what the correct name for them is, as everyone just calls them "triple deckers." They are a three-family home with each "house" being one complete floor of the building.

camlan:
You will find a lot of row houses, or terraced houses, in the larger, older cities. New York City, Boston, Philadelphia.

A lot of the newer row houses are condos, or townhomes, and you'll find them anywhere a developer had enough land to put them on.

Snooks:

--- Quote from: camlan on September 01, 2013, 05:31:52 PM ---Duplexes in the US can be split either horizontally or vertically. I live in a duplex--I have the entire second floor, plus a laundry room and storage area in the basement.

The house next door to mine is also a duplex, but split vertically.

In and around Boston, there are tri-plexes. I have no idea what the correct name for them is, as everyone just calls them "triple deckers." They are a three-family home with each "house" being one complete floor of the building.



How do they access their house? It looks a bit like the large terraces here which are split into flats or purpose built flats which often have communal hallways.

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