Author Topic: Types of houses  (Read 4891 times)

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Snooks

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Types of houses
« on: September 01, 2013, 02:40:14 PM »
Following on from a question in the "This might be a stupid question" thread I was wondering whether different styles of house are just called different things in different countries (try and I might I cannot work out what a duplex is)

In the UK you tend to get detached houses which can vary from a house on it's own plot of land with no neighbours to something in a residential street, like this:


Then there are semi-detatched houses which are houses which share a common wall with one neighbour, like this:


And terraced houses which are a row of houses all attached to each other, like this:


There are also back-to-back houses which are like two rows of terrace houses stuck onto each other at the back (so you don't have a rear exit in the house).

I've left off flats (apartments) because I couldn't think how to find pictures to illustrate the different types.

Bellantara

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2013, 02:55:11 PM »
Just a quick post. . . our US "duplex" is your UK semi-detached house. :)

Snooks

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2013, 03:03:49 PM »
Thanks!  I was thrown because I was sure I'd seen people talking about people having the upstairs of a duplex but maybe I just got confused.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2013, 03:21:16 PM »
Canada here.  Detached, semi-detached, townhomes would be our terminology.  Duplex might be used but it is often more for a house that is split horizontally, rather than vertically.  So the ground floor is one unit and the upstairs is another.

There is also another type of home here called 'linked'.  These homes share a foundation but not walls.  Or if they share a wall, it is a garage wall, not a living space wall.  It is almost a cross between detached and semi-detached.  They are sometimes done to fit more homes into a neighbourhood that they are able to charge more for because they don't share walls but they are cheaper because the foundations aren't completely separate so there is less back filling to do.
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2013, 03:38:39 PM »
What you call terraced or townhouses, we call rowhomes.  I live in one, and I swear to FSM, I never will again.  All the downsides of home ownership AND apartment living.
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Snooks

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2013, 04:58:09 PM »
Diane - any silver lining in the fact it's not a back to back?

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2013, 05:04:51 PM »
Canada here.  Detached, semi-detached, townhomes would be our terminology.  Duplex might be used but it is often more for a house that is split horizontally, rather than vertically.  So the ground floor is one unit and the upstairs is another.

There is also another type of home here called 'linked'.  These homes share a foundation but not walls.  Or if they share a wall, it is a garage wall, not a living space wall.  It is almost a cross between detached and semi-detached.  They are sometimes done to fit more homes into a neighbourhood that they are able to charge more for because they don't share walls but they are cheaper because the foundations aren't completely separate so there is less back filling to do.

In Texas, we have the same definitions. The only other is condo. Here a town home means you own the land that the structure is built on. Condo means you don't own the land.

I've never heard of a linked house. That is interesting.

camlan

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2013, 05:31:52 PM »
Duplexes in the US can be split either horizontally or vertically. I live in a duplex--I have the entire second floor, plus a laundry room and storage area in the basement.

The house next door to mine is also a duplex, but split vertically.

In and around Boston, there are tri-plexes. I have no idea what the correct name for them is, as everyone just calls them "triple deckers." They are a three-family home with each "house" being one complete floor of the building.

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camlan

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2013, 05:34:23 PM »
You will find a lot of row houses, or terraced houses, in the larger, older cities. New York City, Boston, Philadelphia.

A lot of the newer row houses are condos, or townhomes, and you'll find them anywhere a developer had enough land to put them on.
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Snooks

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2013, 05:48:17 PM »
Duplexes in the US can be split either horizontally or vertically. I live in a duplex--I have the entire second floor, plus a laundry room and storage area in the basement.

The house next door to mine is also a duplex, but split vertically.

In and around Boston, there are tri-plexes. I have no idea what the correct name for them is, as everyone just calls them "triple deckers." They are a three-family home with each "house" being one complete floor of the building.



How do they access their house? It looks a bit like the large terraces here which are split into flats or purpose built flats which often have communal hallways.

menley

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2013, 06:05:02 PM »
Just a quick post. . . our US "duplex" is your UK semi-detached house. :)


Not always. It's one house, divided into two separate living spaces for two separate tenants. It may share a common entrance or it may have two separate entrances.

camlan

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2013, 06:13:21 PM »
Duplexes in the US can be split either horizontally or vertically. I live in a duplex--I have the entire second floor, plus a laundry room and storage area in the basement.

The house next door to mine is also a duplex, but split vertically.

In and around Boston, there are tri-plexes. I have no idea what the correct name for them is, as everyone just calls them "triple deckers." They are a three-family home with each "house" being one complete floor of the building.



How do they access their house? It looks a bit like the large terraces here which are split into flats or purpose built flats which often have communal hallways.

If you look carefully at the front of the house under the porch, on the ground floor, you will see two front doors. One door will lead directly into the ground floor house, and the other will lead to a stairway that will allow the residents of the other floors entry.

I think the reason these weren't called apartments back in the day was that a good many of these buildings were owned by one of the residents. They'd either house family members on the other floors, or rent the other floors out. But they didn't have the feeling of an apartment, because of the separate entrances and they had windows on all four sides and because they were on their own tiny plot of land.

Most of these houses would have porches on the back of the house, with another stairway, either inside or outside. The porch would be used for hanging out laundry, and the back stairs would give the ice man a way to get the blocks of ice into the kitchens without it dripping all over the place.

Another variation on these was a two family house, with the ground floor being one "house" and the top two floors being the second "house." I lived in one of these for a while, but the top, or attic, floor had been made into its own space, being rented out as an apartment.
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2013, 06:23:38 PM »
Around here, the duplexes are often much older homes (late 19th, early 20th century) that have been altered.  In fact, when we were buying our realtor told us the county was offering an incentive to anyone who wanted to buy a duplex and convert it back to a single family home. 

In college I lived in an apartment that was a Victorian converted to a vertical duplex.  I loved it, because I love Victorians. :)

As for detached homes, I've also heard them called "Single family homes."
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PastryGoddess

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2013, 06:32:46 PM »
I live in an 80 year old Baltimore rowhome.  We've been fairly lucky with our neighbors as they are very quiet on both sides..

Out in the suburbs rowhomes are called townhomes, and their walls are a lot thinner than ours
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Thipu1

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Re: Types of houses
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2013, 06:04:46 AM »
There can be a slightly different meaning for some of the terms that have been discussed.

In Brooklyn, a duplex refers to an apartment with two floors and an interior stairway.

'Terrace houses' here are 'row houses'. The most common sort around here is the brownstone although these are also made of brick or limestone.  Some are single family homes and others are divided into apartments. These date from the later 19th or early 20th century.

We also have co-ops and condos.  These are usually in larger apartment buildings.  In a condominium, the occupant has purchased the physical apartment and can often make (legal) alterations to the space or sell it without approval from the board.

A co-op is a bit different.  Instead of buying the physical space, the occupant buys shares allocated to a specific apartment.  The size of the apartment decides the number of shares.  This means that the occupants of larger apartment have a little more say in things than the occupants of smaller apartments. In a co-op, occupants must clear renovations with a board elected from the occupants.  Also, if a resident decides to move, the new buyer must be approved by the board. 



« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 06:18:10 AM by Thipu1 »