Author Topic: Types of houses  (Read 7103 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

jilly

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 344
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #45 on: September 07, 2013, 12:41:43 PM »
That sounds / looks like a nice bungalow http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-38461430.html Do you have bungalows in the US?

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5065
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #46 on: September 07, 2013, 01:03:44 PM »
Yes but here bungalows can be 1 story, 1.5 stories, or 2 stories.

This is a typical bungalow in the US

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6893
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #47 on: September 07, 2013, 06:16:26 PM »
Having grown up in a ranch house, I have to ask: how common are they overseas? I never see/hear references to them. Are they an American thing?

what are they? what do they look like?

A ranch house is a 1 story house that has most of the common areas up front and the private areas in the back.  I grew up in a ranch house with a walk out basement.  It may or may not have an
attached garage at the side of the house



I wouldn't call that a Ranch house.  Ranch Houses are all on one floor.  They're long and low.  The house in the picture is perky and sweet but it wouldn't be considered a Ranch House.

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5065
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #48 on: September 07, 2013, 11:56:09 PM »
^^^ I just picked the first thing I saw.  Although this house is all on one level. 

jilly

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 344
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #49 on: September 08, 2013, 08:55:05 AM »
Bungalows in the UK can have rooms in the roof space making them 2 stories, not sure about 1.5 though  ???. So a ranch house is a very specific type of bungalow?

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6893
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #50 on: September 08, 2013, 10:27:43 AM »
Bungalows here tend to be rather boxy while a ranch house is very low.  Even the windows tend to be horizontal. 

A common type of bungalow is known as the Cape Cod or Saltbox. 

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5065
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #51 on: September 08, 2013, 01:26:30 PM »
Bungalows here tend to be rather boxy while a ranch house is very low.  Even the windows tend to be horizontal. 

A common type of bungalow is known as the Cape Cod or Saltbox. 

Yeah,

A ranch house tends to be long and low to the ground. From the front they look longer than they are tall.
A bungalow tends to be boxy.  From the front they look just as tall as they are wide, so more like a square. 

jilly

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 344
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #52 on: September 08, 2013, 01:45:40 PM »
We don't have that distinction in the UK they are all just bungalows.

MummyPumpkin83

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 238
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #53 on: September 08, 2013, 10:48:19 PM »
on realestate.com.au the types of property you can select are
House
Apartment/Unit
Townhouse
Villa
Acreage
Rural
Retirement Living

A house would be what in the UK is a bungalow, they could be single level, split level, or double storey.

An apartment/unit would be in a block of units/apartments. Usually with shared laundry facilities - though many now have a small internal laundry

Townhouse and Villa tend to be used interchangeably. Though Technically I think a townhouse is more like a row house, and villas are a groups of houses. At the moment we live in a 2 storey "Villa" we are joined by the garage wall to our neighbour, and they are joined to their neighbour (ie: a row of 3 houses) and across the driveway is another row of 3 houses. So we all shared the one driveway for 6 villas (some people would call these townhouses).

Retirement living is a small complex of villas, usually single storey, that may or may not be joined to one neighbour. Usually you have to be over 55 to live/purchase in one of these complexes.
Mummy to 3 little Pumpkin boys!

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6893
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #54 on: September 09, 2013, 10:35:18 AM »
In the US retirement living can have any number of configurations.

In our neighborhood, there are two.  Both are apartment buildings. 

Where MIL lives, there are several apartment buildings of four floors.  There are also individual one floor units with space between.  These are connected by a common, covered walkway. 

In places like 'The Villages' in Florida, 'retirement living' can mean unconnected individual houses and can spread over a considerable distance.  In 'The Villages' a common way of getting around is the golf cart.     

Snooks

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2514
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #55 on: September 10, 2013, 06:45:57 AM »
<snip>
A house would be what in the UK is a bungalow, they could be single level, split level, or double storey.
<snip>

In the UK a bungalow is a single story building.

Hmmmmm

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6712
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #56 on: September 10, 2013, 08:56:30 PM »
This is where things get interesting. 

In our building, most of the units are duplexes (an apartment on two floors with an interior stairway).  Our particular apartment is all on one floor.  That's a flat.  You can't really call a unit like a duplex a 'flat' because it isn't flat. 

Real Estate ads will mention if a unit for sale or rent is a conversion.  Sometimes, they will specifically mention a 'Parlor Floor Conversion'.  When a brownstone was first built as a single family home, the parlor floor was the formal section of the house.  It usually had higher ceilings and more elaborate woodwork than the rest of the building.  That often makes it more desirable as a conversion.

Back onto duplex, because the other defintions were so different for me.

In my area, I've always thought of a duplex as as a single house that is divided into two apartments and each has it's own exterior entrance. A triplex has 3 apartments and 3 separate entrances, and a quadplex has four. And most duplexes in my city are one story. There might be a few two story duplexes but they would usually be divided vertically so both have 2 stories and ground floor exterior entrances.

Here, most condos have some type of interior hallway that is used to access the apartment, but some have exterior entrances. The apartment owners do not own the land underneath and have less control over what changes can occur.

Patio home and townhomes here normally have shared walls, and small private patios. There is an association that owners pay dues to to pay for common areas, exterior landscaping and even things like repainting all of the exterior units.  I always thought of patio homes being one story and townhouses being 2 but that could have been my quirk.

There is one area in our town with single story homes, with no shared walls and each has a very small garden. But they are marketed as condo's because the owners do not own the land and can not make changes to the exterior and they pay a high monthly maintenance cost of exterior landscaping and care.

Another popular type home here is a Zero lot line home. Basically, a single family residence with no shared walls but the home takes up most of the lot. There is also no common association.

silvercelt

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 452
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #57 on: September 12, 2013, 05:06:23 PM »
Here is a picture of a typical ranch house.  They can be longer, and deeper, but in Ohio where I grew up (and even in VA where I am now), this is a pretty standard ranch-style house.


jaxsue

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10297
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #58 on: September 27, 2013, 12:49:24 AM »
I think hobish is trying to say that the people she works with should know that a condo is a type of ownership and a duplex is a type of home.  They don't mean the same thing although can can be used to describe the same home.

I was just added a few other ways people get confused.

Right. I didn't mean to make it more so! :)

I am in New Jersey, but work for a national company. Single family homes can sometimes be condos, they are not common except in Michigan and more recently in California. It's just that a lot of people assume connected housing = condo and it isn't really the case. I hope that makes more sense.

I am in NJ, too (hi, neighbor!). I call homes that aren't owned, but rented, as rentals. I don't recall single-family homes being called condos in MI (grew up there) at all. Is this relatively new?

jaxsue

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10297
Re: Types of houses
« Reply #59 on: September 27, 2013, 12:51:25 AM »
Interesting thread, especially about the duplexes; I've often wondered what constituted one of those. I had in my head some kind of arrangement like our semi-detached houses.

I live in a large Edwardian house (UK, so about 100 years old I guess) which while originally would have been one dwelling for probably a well-off person/family, has later been divided into four flats. Two on the ground floor and two on the first floor. It has a shared front door to the street and a communal hallway, with the internal doors to flats A&B on the ground floor then the doors to flats C&D on the first at the top of the stairs. This kind of place is very common here especially in cities.  What would this kind of building be called in the US? I get the feeling they wouldn't be "apartments", because they're not in a block. When I think "apartment block" I think like the place they lived in Friends. Purpose-built, in other words, rather than a house converted into two or more dwellings. We just call them 'flats'.

There are different kinds of flats though - the one I live in are 'converted flats', often referred to in sales particulars as 'ground floor conversion' or 'first floor conversion' etc. There are also purpose built flats in developments or tower blocks. 'Apartment' hasn't really made it over here, except to describe very high end luxury flats.

IME we would call those apartments. Apartments don't have to be those big developments. YMMV.