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  • September 04, 2015, 06:38:49 PM

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Author Topic: AGA Range  (Read 1426 times)

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DavidH

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AGA Range
« on: February 09, 2015, 06:43:46 PM »
I saw on another thread an AGA mentioned.  I've only seen one once here in the US and it seemed like a range that was always on.  It seems like it would use a lot of energy and also heat up the kitchen.  I can understand why for a lot of the year, the heating up the kitchen might be a plus in the UK, but what about in the summer?  I know people think very highly of them, so I there must be something I'm not understanding about them.  Can anyone enlighten me?

veryfluffy

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2015, 04:14:27 AM »
Yes, they are expensive to run. Yes, they are on all the time -- unless you have a second cooker for use in the summer, and turn off the AGA. (There is a similar range made by Rayburn, that will also run all the central heating in the house.)

Some people absolutely swear by them, that they cook everything much better. Based on my experience with them at other people's homes, I would find it a nightmare to use, since the heat they give out is much more difficult to vary and control.

This is a pretty good summary:

http://www.countystonegranite.co.uk/guides/2014/03/14/can-i-afford-an-aga-running-costs-explained
   

magicdomino

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2015, 10:14:20 AM »
One thing about AGAs that isn't always mentioned is the weight.  AGAs are mostly, if not entirely, cast iron.  If there is a basement or crawl space under the kitchen, the standard floor joists won't be able to support it without reinforcement. 

They are beautiful, but much better suited to their native environment of a stone-walled-and-floored English cottage on the moors.    ;)

DavidH

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2015, 10:16:33 AM »
Thank you, that we the perfect link.  I suppose in a cool climate it might make sense, but in a warm one...not so much. 

I can't imagine what the person I knew was thinking.  This was in suburban Atlanta, where the last thing you need is more heat for most of the year and they likely had to rebuild the floor to install it. 

Mustard

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2015, 11:39:48 AM »
AGAs are somewhat aspirational; definitely lovely cottages on the moors and all that.  They do describe a genre in literature; AGA sagas..

ITSJUSTME

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2015, 12:49:32 PM »
I would adore having an AGA in our Chicago winters - but our Chicago summers rule them out.

I have been taught they are very efficient because once heated up they stay warm and only require additional firing for the boiling or broiling plates.

I was also taught that during warmer times they can be "turned back" (not the actual term) and then reheated as needed but that still in a hot, humid climate they are not ideal.

The real reason I want one is that I'm sure the cat would never leave it and I would love to hang damp dish towels & things on the front rails to dry . . . plus they are so awesome to look at.

There IS an AGA that operates much the way a gas range does and does not require the cooker to be on all the time.  The expense (as I recall) is about the same but you'll probably only see one in a high end kitchen outfitter or appliance center.  ABT in the Chicago area has the gas range type on display (or did a few years ago) and there was a kitchen designer in Wilmette IL that had one on display.

(sings) . . . but I can dream, can't I? . . .

Drunken Housewife

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2015, 08:41:25 PM »
I live in the U.S., and I own an Aga, and I love it dearly.

Mine is not always on.  The new Agas are not; they have departed from that original, amazing design.  I have an Aga Legacy:  http://st.houzz.com/simgs/1941459d0f832258_4-4900/traditional-gas-ranges-and-electric-ranges.jpg  The burners are gas, and the ovens are electric. 

Funnily enough the AGA is made in France, at the same factory that makes Lacanche (which is really my dream range).  I wrote about shopping for the Aga here:  http://www.drunkenhousewife.com/2010/06/temporary-area-of-expertise.html
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veryfluffy

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2015, 03:36:00 AM »
I have a Lacanche (in delft blue), and it's wonderful. Five gas burners on top, and one electric oven and one gas oven. But it didn't cost nearly as much as an AGA would have!
   

Mustard

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2015, 11:17:45 AM »
Pamela Mitford (one of the famed Mitford gels) apparently had a cornflower blue AGA to match her eyes..

Drunken Housewife

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2015, 12:07:55 PM »
@veryfluffy:  My Aga Legacy is a lot cheaper than the Lacanche ranges of similar size.  I got the Aga instead of the Lacanche to save money; I was really taken by the Lacanche.  Your Lacanche sounds so lovely!  I really enjoy my Aga, though.  If I ever had the ability to get whatever I wanted, I'd get a massive Lacanche.  I have spent some wasteful time playing around on the Design Your Dream Lacanche site:  http://www.lacanche.com/Kitchen-ranges/Cormatin.php
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veryfluffy

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2015, 09:55:42 AM »
Ah, I googled images  -- that is sold as the Rangemaster brand here in the UK, although I guess it is owned by AGA. Yes, those are more reasonable.
   

JeanLouiseFinch

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2015, 08:46:09 PM »
One possible use for an AGA is in a kosher household, where you can't turn a stove on or off from Friday night to Saturday night, but many Orthodox Jews insist on eating hot food on Saturday morning and when they come home from temple on Saturday. I don't know if you heard about that terrible house fire in Brooklyn where 7 out of 8 children died. In part, the cause of the fire was a special kind of hotplate that many ultra-Orthodox use through the weekend. Unfortunately, many of them are not really meant to be kept on for that long. An AGA, expensive though it is, would have prevented that fire.

Golden Phoenix

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2015, 09:18:48 AM »
My parents had a Rayburn" a smaller version of an Aga, in deep maroon, I miss that cooker so much, it did the best slow cooked food in the warmer oven.

We could chose from gas fired or solid fuel, for practical purposes they went with gas.

Ours both cooked our food and was hooked into the heating/hot water system.

It had baffles inside it that you could switch over to direct the flame, both baffles down meant the hob surface got hot, right baffle all the way up powered the oven, left up fed the hot water and heating, or you could adjust the baffles to anywhere in between to fire two or even all three. Because it was gas we didn't have to have it on 24/7 but a traditional one you couldn't let the fire go out.


greencat

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Re: AGA Range
« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2015, 10:07:07 AM »
I didn't know I needed a bigger kitchen so I can put a Cluny 1800 in it!