Author Topic: Do you have an electric kettle?  (Read 15704 times)

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Carotte

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #165 on: January 22, 2014, 08:06:57 AM »
The secret with hard water is to immediately empty the kettle when you are done with it so the minerals don't deposit out.  And pouring hot water down the kitchen sink can be good for the pipes, helping to take any greasy residue down with it.

It is probably easier to use vinegar on a stovetop kettle but it works just fine in an electric kettle, too.

There's another practical reason for doing it- it is far safer to dispose of the hot water as soon as you don't need it any more. I always tip unused hot water down the sink, and make sure I only boil what I need. It drives my DH up the wall...

Sometimes I use the excess hot water to boil the kitchen sponges. I don't have a micro-wave so it's another way to kill germs and stuff.
(Just to be clear, I pour the hot water on the sponges while they're in the sink, I don't put them in the kettle)

sparksals

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #166 on: January 22, 2014, 07:40:27 PM »
If you drink green tea and pour in after boiling, you are not getting the best benefit and taste from the tea b/c the hot water is burning it and it will taste bitter.  When I got my variable temp kettle, I learned a new appreciation for Green Tea.

Maybe this is why I don't like green tea and herbal teas.  They all taste like grass to me.  Some of them smell wonderful but taste like I just steeped a bunch of dried glass clippings in my mug.

I drink mostly Earl Grey and orange pekoe and always put the water in while it is still boiling a little bit.  I'm so fussy that I carry a little 4 cup kettle with me whenever I travel to have in the hotel room.  Hot water from the coffee pot just isn't hot enough, not to mention tasting vaguely of coffee.  Blech!  I was on a course and the caterers delivered hot water in a pot that had previously held coffee.  It was the most disgusting tea I've ever tasted.  Ever since then, my kettle goes with me everywhere I think I might need it.  And I take my tea with me, too.


I had the same problem.  I was introduced to Steeped Tea when I was home in Canada this past Sept - they were on Dragon's Den.  Have you heard of them?  I had not drank tea in a very long time, since university when I switched to coffee to function.  Never went back to tea until I was re-intro'd this past Fall.


When I tried the Steeped Green tea here at home (it is now in the US), I did not like green or white tea.. they all had no flavour or tasted bitter.  It wasn't until I got the variable temp kettle that I really learned that the temp of the water makes ALL the difference. 


I made a cup of the Coconut Calypso this morning for the first time after getting my new kettle.  I tried it when I first ordered it and didn't like it.. it was bitter and had no flavour.  WHAT A difference!  I can taste the coconut and the tea doesn't taste like you described either. 


If you are a big tea drinker, I suggest you check out Steeped.  It is competitive, if not better than David's and not as expensive.  They were on Dragon's Den a couple years ago and got funding from Jim Treveling and Rick Chilton of Wealthy Barber.

sparksals

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #167 on: January 22, 2014, 07:42:19 PM »
The secret with hard water is to immediately empty the kettle when you are done with it so the minerals don't deposit out.  And pouring hot water down the kitchen sink can be good for the pipes, helping to take any greasy residue down with it.

It is probably easier to use vinegar on a stovetop kettle but it works just fine in an electric kettle, too.


I learned something.. never never NEVER reboil water for tea.  There is something to do with the oxidization or something like that that breaks down the tea, alters the flavour. 


sparksals

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #168 on: January 22, 2014, 07:43:19 PM »
The secret with hard water is to immediately empty the kettle when you are done with it so the minerals don't deposit out.  And pouring hot water down the kitchen sink can be good for the pipes, helping to take any greasy residue down with it.

It is probably easier to use vinegar on a stovetop kettle but it works just fine in an electric kettle, too.

There's another practical reason for doing it- it is far safer to dispose of the hot water as soon as you don't need it any more. I always tip unused hot water down the sink, and make sure I only boil what I need. It drives my DH up the wall...

Sometimes I use the excess hot water to boil the kitchen sponges. I don't have a micro-wave so it's another way to kill germs and stuff.
(Just to be clear, I pour the hot water on the sponges while they're in the sink, I don't put them in the kettle)


Thank goodness for that!! LOL


I put my sponges in the dishwasher. 

sunnygirl

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #169 on: January 22, 2014, 08:09:43 PM »
If you drink green tea and pour in after boiling, you are not getting the best benefit and taste from the tea b/c the hot water is burning it and it will taste bitter.  When I got my variable temp kettle, I learned a new appreciation for Green Tea.
Good to know! I never boil water for tea unless it's for 'proper' tea (i.e. PG Tips or similar), mainly because I'm far too impatient to wait for the water to boil then cool to drinking temperature, but I'm glad I now have a proper response to why I'm doin' it wrong.  ;)

Hollanda

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #170 on: January 23, 2014, 08:25:35 AM »
The secret with hard water is to immediately empty the kettle when you are done with it so the minerals don't deposit out.  And pouring hot water down the kitchen sink can be good for the pipes, helping to take any greasy residue down with it.

It is probably easier to use vinegar on a stovetop kettle but it works just fine in an electric kettle, too.

There's another practical reason for doing it- it is far safer to dispose of the hot water as soon as you don't need it any more. I always tip unused hot water down the sink, and make sure I only boil what I need. It drives my DH up the wall...

Sometimes I use the excess hot water to boil the kitchen sponges. I don't have a micro-wave so it's another way to kill germs and stuff.
(Just to be clear, I pour the hot water on the sponges while they're in the sink, I don't put them in the kettle)

I just cracked up laughing at that!!!
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Midnight Kitty

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #171 on: January 23, 2014, 12:54:35 PM »
I learn something new every day!  I never knew that boiling water made green tea bitter.  I thought all tea had to be made by pouring boiling water directly onto the leaves (or tea bag).  I noticed some bitterness in the green teas, but I thought I was steeping them for too long.
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

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Hmmmmm

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #172 on: January 23, 2014, 01:01:57 PM »
If you go to a really good tea place to buy loose teas, they'll actually state the recommended temp of the water and how long to steep. But this is a nice chart to reference. Someone once gave me a tea cloth with a similar chart imprinted on it. I loved that tea cloth.
forgot the link
http://www.tealeaves.com/technique/steeping-chart/

sparksals

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #173 on: January 23, 2014, 02:53:13 PM »
I learn something new every day!  I never knew that boiling water made green tea bitter.  I thought all tea had to be made by pouring boiling water directly onto the leaves (or tea bag).  I noticed some bitterness in the green teas, but I thought I was steeping them for too long.


There are two things that make tea bitter:  Water is too high of a temperature and over brewing.  Green and black teas are the most susceptible to bitterness b/c of the above reasons.  White, Rooibos and Herbal can be  brewed and rebrewed successfully... and are not temp sensitive. 

ETA: White is a tea that needs to brew to about 180 and Oolong also has its own temp.  Black, Rooibos, Herbal and Fruit can all be heated to the highest temp.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2014, 03:16:24 PM by sparksals »

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #174 on: January 23, 2014, 02:57:54 PM »
Well, I tried letting the water cool a little bit after boiling, but I got busy, left it too long, and now it tastes more like paper than green tea.  :P 

I need a food thermometer for my kitchen (the one my mother passed down to me finally died) so I think I'll get 2 so I can keep one in my office where I drink most of my tea.  I drink all the "teas" mentioned: White, green, oolong, black, herbal, & fruit tisanes.  I just noticed that the Tazo tea bags have the water temperature and steeping times printed on the tea bags.  I don't want to say how long I've been drinking them and not following the directions.  :-[
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

sparksals

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #175 on: January 23, 2014, 03:15:16 PM »
If you go to a really good tea place to buy loose teas, they'll actually state the recommended temp of the water and how long to steep. But this is a nice chart to reference. Someone once gave me a tea cloth with a similar chart imprinted on it. I loved that tea cloth.
forgot the link
http://www.tealeaves.com/technique/steeping-chart/


Interesting how some of the steeping times are different, especially for the green tea.    I find I can get away with brewing some green teas longer than recco'd  ... as long as I boil to the proper temp.  The temp is the most unforgiving.

The chart below is from Steeped Tea.  Many Canadians might be familiar with Steeped since it is a Canadian company, was on Dragon's Den (the Canadian version of Shark Tank) and it is just new in the US so most Americans may not have heard of it.   

There is one tea I didn't like at all before I got my new kettle... Steeped Tea Coconut Calypso White Tea.  It tasted bitter and I could not taste coconut.  THen, I had a cup the other day brewed to white tea temp and i absolutely LOVED it.  Nice hint of coconut, not too overpowering.


I recco'd the Cuisinart kettle to three of my friends when I was home in Canada last week for one of their mom's funeral.  I stayed with one friend and got to try some of the teas  I had not tried yet.  Now I have new tea flavours I want to buyy!  Hate when that happens.  LOL  She mentioned she didn't like this or that tea and I told her it was b/c of the kettle and incorrect temp.  So, all three of them bought the kettle and they are now reporting loving teas the previously disliked. 


I also second that the key to a good cup of tea is a good quality tea.  I recently found a new appreciation for it and I am enjoying using my grandma's teacups she left me that were always put away for fear of breaking them.  She died 26 years ago and I just pulled them out.  I love my cup of tea in the fine bone china Petit Point pattern.  It just doesn't taste the 'same' in an old mug.


I enjoy a cup of herbal tea before I go to bed or after a very filling meal.  I find it helps my digestion and a more restful sleep.



sparksals

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #176 on: January 23, 2014, 03:17:19 PM »
Well, I tried letting the water cool a little bit after boiling, but I got busy, left it too long, and now it tastes more like paper than green tea.  :P 

I need a food thermometer for my kitchen (the one my mother passed down to me finally died) so I think I'll get 2 so I can keep one in my office where I drink most of my tea.  I drink all the "teas" mentioned: White, green, oolong, black, herbal, & fruit tisanes.  I just noticed that the Tazo tea bags have the water temperature and steeping times printed on the tea bags.  I don't want to say how long I've been drinking them and not following the directions.  :-[


A variable temp kettle should solve that problem.  ;)


Midnight Kitty

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #177 on: January 23, 2014, 05:58:11 PM »
Well, I tried letting the water cool a little bit after boiling, but I got busy, left it too long, and now it tastes more like paper than green tea.  :P 

I need a food thermometer for my kitchen (the one my mother passed down to me finally died) so I think I'll get 2 so I can keep one in my office where I drink most of my tea.  I drink all the "teas" mentioned: White, green, oolong, black, herbal, & fruit tisanes.  I just noticed that the Tazo tea bags have the water temperature and steeping times printed on the tea bags.  I don't want to say how long I've been drinking them and not following the directions.  :-[

A variable temp kettle should solve that problem.  ;)
Yes, it would  ;)

I bet the food thermometer is cheaper & takes less space ;D
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

Hmmmmm

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #178 on: January 23, 2014, 06:14:18 PM »
Well, I tried letting the water cool a little bit after boiling, but I got busy, left it too long, and now it tastes more like paper than green tea.  :P 

I need a food thermometer for my kitchen (the one my mother passed down to me finally died) so I think I'll get 2 so I can keep one in my office where I drink most of my tea.  I drink all the "teas" mentioned: White, green, oolong, black, herbal, & fruit tisanes.  I just noticed that the Tazo tea bags have the water temperature and steeping times printed on the tea bags.  I don't want to say how long I've been drinking them and not following the directions.  :-[

A variable temp kettle should solve that problem.  ;)
Yes, it would  ;)

I bet the food thermometer is cheaper & takes less space ;D

Oh yeah, it is.

But for anyone who'd like a variable temperature and don't want to spend the money on the cuisinart(sparksals) or breville(mine), Hamilton Beach makes on that is about half their prices.


http://www.amazon.com/Hamilton-Beach-40996-Programmable-1-7-Liter/dp/B0083I7THI/ref=cm_cr_pr_sims_t

PastryGoddess

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Re: Do you have an electric kettle?
« Reply #179 on: January 23, 2014, 09:45:46 PM »
guys...I just discovered electric kettles with automatic shutoff and brought 4 of them.  Now I'm going to "have" to go out and buy a variable temp kettle. 

y'all are not helping ;)