Author Topic: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules  (Read 2754 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

PeterM

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3321
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2013, 11:11:28 PM »
We don't have many house rules for games, but that's because we play so many that we don't have time to actually set house rules. We don't often repeat games that lend themselves to modding, unless D&D counts. And in that instance, the whole game is set by house rules, as our DM is playing D&D in the Warhammer 40K world. It's...special.

A D&D game I played in in Boston has been running more or less continuously since 1978 or so. The rules are a modification of 1st edition AD&D, in the same way that a penguin is a modification of a Tyrannosaurus.

I don't think I've ever played in an RPG that didn't have at least a few major house rules, but many of them are subtle enough that you might not realize they're house rules until you're talking with someone else who plays the same game in a different group.

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1861
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2013, 03:56:15 AM »
We don't have many house rules for games, but that's because we play so many that we don't have time to actually set house rules. We don't often repeat games that lend themselves to modding, unless D&D counts. And in that instance, the whole game is set by house rules, as our DM is playing D&D in the Warhammer 40K world. It's...special.

A D&D game I played in in Boston has been running more or less continuously since 1978 or so. The rules are a modification of 1st edition AD&D, in the same way that a penguin is a modification of a Tyrannosaurus.

I don't think I've ever played in an RPG that didn't have at least a few major house rules, but many of them are subtle enough that you might not realize they're house rules until you're talking with someone else who plays the same game in a different group.
The big house rule for D&D is rule zero: the DM has the final say on the rules.

Leafy

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 186
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2013, 06:46:43 AM »
Our Scrabble rule is that you can look up a word in the dictionary to double check your spelling or make sure it is a word that is allowed. No looking up randomly - you must have a word in mind.

In Uno we play that you can add a Draw 2 or Draw 4 if there is one on the pile and then the next person must draw the cumulative total. Not sure if this is an actual rule but I have played with people who have not allowed it.

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1112
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2013, 06:59:12 AM »
Not a house rule, as such; but sometimes after the game of Scrabble is finished, we have each player make up a story -- or anyway, a piece of semi-intelligible prose -- from all of the words which have been put out on the board (and those words only). It's generally agreed, "the sillier the better"...

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1861
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2013, 07:09:24 AM »
Our Scrabble rule is that you can look up a word in the dictionary to double check your spelling or make sure it is a word that is allowed. No looking up randomly - you must have a word in mind.

In Uno we play that you can add a Draw 2 or Draw 4 if there is one on the pile and then the next person must draw the cumulative total. Not sure if this is an actual rule but I have played with people who have not allowed it.
It's not, it's said in the rules you can't do that. A player who gets dealt a draw 2 or draw 4 card forfeits their turn.

Snooks

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2483
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #20 on: September 10, 2013, 07:20:44 AM »
Whenever we get a new game we play through as per the rules once then decide how the game could be "better" and use those rules in the future.

drzim

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 648
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #21 on: September 10, 2013, 01:54:46 PM »
In UNO:

If playing while camping and it gets too dark to tell green and blue apart, they become one color.

This rule is genius. 

Stanwyck

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 334
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2013, 05:13:58 PM »
Fast Uno: You can play a card out of turn if you can match it exactly (color and number). Draw 2s and Draw 4s are stackable (but not on each other). You can also play two or more of the exact same card at one time.  It's especially fun when you have two decks and about 15 people playing.

Settlers of Catan: We put the numbers on the board upside down until everyone gets their first round of roads and villages placed. Then we turn up only those numbers that have villages on them. This makes it a little more challenging to pick the right places to build.

My family plays mostly card games and the number one house rule is that complaining about your hand is not only allowed, but necessary.  ;D

daen

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 807
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2013, 05:49:23 PM »
My childhood variant on UNO, developed by my sister: 25-card UNO - of necessity for two players only.
Rule #1: Each player gets 25 cards.
Rule #2: Any "trouble" card (Skip, Reverse, Draw 2, Draw 4) is a missed turn for the other player. All other rules still apply.

These two rules mean that you can play a long string of high-point cards, and sock the other player with a handful of cards as your turn is ending. Because it's not enough to win - the other should lose as spectacularly as possible , due to the existence of

Rule #3: You must do one pushup for every ten points in your hand when the other player plays her last card.

carol1412

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 362
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #24 on: September 11, 2013, 03:40:53 PM »
Euchre - playing with friends.
When someone gets to 5 or below, it's automatically "town they grew up in" rules. That means flipping up the top card of the dummy hand. If it's clubs, that's now trump. If not, the bidding goes on as usual. You'd think it makes the game end faster, but that's not always the case. Sometimes the automatic clubs bid goes against the person with the low score.

Outdoor Girl

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 14008
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2013, 03:47:07 PM »
A varient of Euchre an elderly friend introduced to me:  'Railroad Euchre'.

When you call a lone hand, your partner passes you their best card!
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

ITSJUSTME

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 409
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2013, 04:37:20 PM »
I once played Trivial Pursuit with a couple who had this rule.  After you won your colored wedge and put it in your wheel, if you later landed on the square that wins a wedge but got the answer wrong, you had to give back your wedge and then win it back at a later turn.  I'm telling you that game of Trivial Pursuit wend on for hours.  We were not allowed to leave until it was over.  I think we were there until 2 am.  Maybe those were the Mensa rules???

crankycat

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 326
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2013, 05:17:17 PM »
In Cards Against Humanity (which is like a very crass version of Apples to Apples), we always have 'Random' thrown in each play.  (This helps pad the options when playing with only 4-6 people.)  If the reader selects the random card as the best answer, then s/he gets to keep the black card for the point.

ETA: This is a modification of the Rando Cardrissian rule.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2013, 05:19:47 PM by crankycat »

Arila

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 801
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2013, 06:33:33 PM »
- If a player had the information to make a different decision, and it doesn't affect the subsequent turns taken by other players, "rewinding"/"redoing" according to the agreement of the whole group is allowed. This at first seems to be something which would slow down the game, but in reality, it makes it faster, because people can take their turns relatively quickly rather than going very slowly to ensure that they have evaluated *EVERY* possibility before taking their turn. This works better for euro style games, where there's only sort of tangential player interaction.

- For book-keeping heavy games, announce your moves, indicate to the next player that you have finished your public moves and are merely completing a transaction with the bank/rearranging something on the board according to your stated intentions etc.

We also have House rules for house rules:
- Write them down, so they can be rules-lawyered like any other.
- If there is a dispute about the interpretation of a rule, and we are playing with an even number of players, roll a die to determine the interpretation to be used for that instance of the game, and apply consistently.
- If a rule has been misinterpreted for the first portion of a game, play the rest of the game "wrong" to be fair, but make sure it's clear and clarified at the end of the game, and before the next game is begun.


Most of these we have only ever needed these for Killer Bunnies, but we have about 7-9 house rules for that. :D

Snooks

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2483
Re: Board Game Etiquette S/O: House Rules
« Reply #29 on: September 12, 2013, 04:33:41 PM »
In Cards Against Humanity (which is like a very crass version of Apples to Apples)

This sounds like a game I need, although our games of apples to apples are pretty crass whenever possible.