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Language Barrier Etiquette

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cwm:

--- Quote from: Twik on September 17, 2013, 12:10:21 PM ---I'm in an English-speaking region, I have an Anglo last name, six letters long, and I always spell it when spelling is important. There's just too many possible variations of even the simplest name to be sure it will be spelled correctly by those who hear it.

--- End quote ---

My last name is four letters long. It's a very common adjective. I still have to spell it out every single time that spelling is important because people will spell it wrong.

camlan:
My Scottish last name has a double "L" in the middle of it. When I lived in an area with a high percentage of Spanish-speaking people, I tended to spell it out more than usual. In my name, the double L is pronounced as an L. In Spanish, the pronunciation is completely different. I'd say my last name and then start to spell it. I'd get a lot of surprised faces once I hit the "L, L," part of it.

But I tend to spell it out most of the time when I'm not in Home City, because there's just no way to know there are 2 Ls in there from the pronunciation of it.

marcel:

--- Quote from: mspallaton on September 09, 2013, 04:40:33 PM ---Also:

Avoid slang: Most language classes don't teach colloquialisms.  One of the last things that is learned is true conversational language because there are so many quirks and nuances to how the language is spoken in everyday life.

I once dated a young man who spoke English as a second language and he explained that in his home country and language there is a phrase that means "pay attention", but directly translates to English as "turn on your batteries".  I had studied his language, but would never in a million years have understood that phrase without assistance.  Not to mention that it was a common phrase in his country, but that many countries share his language as their own and most do not have that saying.

--- End quote ---
I disagree with that one, I actualy think it is good to use slang and common expressions, especialy to people that want to live in the country.

Peppergirl:
Regarding spelling:  I work in a call center and never fail to be amazed that people will rattle off an *extremely* difficult last name, and then don't spell it unless I ask. 

I occasionally even pause and give them a moment, because I usually assume (and most do) that if your last name is Iouweriuowerjasdfi, you'll realize I won't automatically know how to spell it.  ;D

MissRose:

--- Quote from: Peppergirl on November 16, 2013, 06:48:22 AM ---Regarding spelling:  I work in a call center and never fail to be amazed that people will rattle off an *extremely* difficult last name, and then don't spell it unless I ask. 

I occasionally even pause and give them a moment, because I usually assume (and most do) that if your last name is Iouweriuowerjasdfi, you'll realize I won't automatically know how to spell it.  ;D

--- End quote ---

I've had people do that to me, and I encourage people to spell their names if I am unsure or do not see it listed in the account records.

I will spell my last name for people as it is uncommon. 

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