Author Topic: Kitchen Sink Etiquette  (Read 9712 times)

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EmmaJ.

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2013, 12:16:54 PM »
Does Marissa do the grocery shopping?  Tell her to stop buying apples.

EllenS

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2013, 12:46:36 PM »
They are both wrong.  Apple cores go in the compost pile or worm bin.   ;)


POD!  We have a pretty porcelain compost container, suitable for the countertop, with a built-in charcoal filter.  No smell, no visible scraps, happy happy garden.
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Surianne

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #32 on: September 17, 2013, 12:50:51 PM »
Does Marissa do the grocery shopping?  Tell her to stop buying apples.

Hah!  If she does do most of the shopping, that's a pretty ingenious solution.

SlitherHiss

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #33 on: September 17, 2013, 12:51:47 PM »
They are both wrong.  Apple cores go in the compost pile or worm bin.   ;)


POD!  We have a pretty porcelain compost container, suitable for the countertop, with a built-in charcoal filter.  No smell, no visible scraps, happy happy garden.

Do you mind sharing what brand/model it is? That sounds like something we need.

EllenS

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #34 on: September 17, 2013, 01:02:02 PM »
It's either this one or very similar.  I got it at a small local hardware store.

http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Gallon-Ceramic-Compost-Keeper/dp/B000K76CPK

We dump it in the outside pile a couple of times a week, unless I am making soup or we cut up a watermelon.  Great for coffee grounds, too.  Now, you may get a whiff when you open the lid, but there is no smell when closed.
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MindsEye

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #35 on: September 17, 2013, 01:03:54 PM »
Does Marissa do the grocery shopping?  Tell her to stop buying apples.

Hah!  If she does do most of the shopping, that's a pretty ingenious solution.

I was going to suggest that.  :)

Marissa's husband can't remember to throw his apple cores in the trash?  No more apples for Marissa's husband!

SlitherHiss

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #36 on: September 17, 2013, 01:07:39 PM »
It's either this one or very similar.  I got it at a small local hardware store.

http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Gallon-Ceramic-Compost-Keeper/dp/B000K76CPK

We dump it in the outside pile a couple of times a week, unless I am making soup or we cut up a watermelon.  Great for coffee grounds, too.  Now, you may get a whiff when you open the lid, but there is no smell when closed.

That is awesome. /threadjack

amylouky

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #37 on: September 17, 2013, 01:12:24 PM »
I am on the wife's side.

the husband sounds like my prat of a brother who at 49 still takes milk and pours it in the clean dishes on Christmas and other special occasions, so I have to wash them. Mom thinks it's no big deal and never did a thing about it. So he's still doing it.
 If a person is never forced to change childish behaviour they never grow out of it.

Your brother does what?? Why does he pour milk in the clean dishes, and why does that mean that you have to be the one to wash them?

SlitherHiss

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #38 on: September 17, 2013, 01:17:37 PM »
I am on the wife's side.

the husband sounds like my prat of a brother who at 49 still takes milk and pours it in the clean dishes on Christmas and other special occasions, so I have to wash them. Mom thinks it's no big deal and never did a thing about it. So he's still doing it.
 If a person is never forced to change childish behaviour they never grow out of it.

Your brother does what?? Why does he pour milk in the clean dishes, and why does that mean that you have to be the one to wash them?

This sounds like a pretty extreme divergence from Marissa's husband's behavior, which is careless and selfish, but not intentionally designed to cause additional work. Snowdragon, your family sounds almost unbelievable!

Teenyweeny

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #39 on: September 17, 2013, 01:18:05 PM »
I am on the wife's side.

the husband sounds like my prat of a brother who at 49 still takes milk and pours it in the clean dishes on Christmas and other special occasions, so I have to wash them. Mom thinks it's no big deal and never did a thing about it. So he's still doing it.
 If a person is never forced to change childish behaviour they never grow out of it.

Your brother does what?? Why does he pour milk in the clean dishes, and why does that mean that you have to be the one to wash them?

Yeah, I would just leave them! If anybody kicked up a fuss, I'd happily say "I don't care who will clean them, but I do know that it won't be me". Ugh.



metallicafan

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #40 on: September 17, 2013, 01:18:42 PM »
I am on the wife's side.

the husband sounds like my prat of a brother who at 49 still takes milk and pours it in the clean dishes on Christmas and other special occasions, so I have to wash them. Mom thinks it's no big deal and never did a thing about it. So he's still doing it.
 If a person is never forced to change childish behaviour they never grow out of it.

Your brother does what?? Why does he pour milk in the clean dishes, and why does that mean that you have to be the one to wash them?

I am wondering the exact same thing.

esposita

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #41 on: September 17, 2013, 01:29:59 PM »
Does Marissa do the grocery shopping?  Tell her to stop buying apples.

Hah!  If she does do most of the shopping, that's a pretty ingenious solution.

I was going to suggest that.  :)

Marissa's husband can't remember to throw his apple cores in the trash?  No more apples for Marissa's husband!

Love this solution. What I'd do is collect the cores, dry them, and string them onto a necklace which would be ceremoniously given to him. Or I might save them in little baggies and hide them in spots around the house that he frequently uses like under his pillow, on his partition of the medicine cabinet, in his lunchbox...

He would take it as the joke it was meant as, realize that it was important to me that he dispose of them, and knock it off. But that's just how the two of us operate.

Part of me wonders why, if she cleans the dishes, why she doesn't just put the core down the disposal with the rest of the dish scrapings, using a fork or spoon to nudge it. I mean, if this is how they typically dispose of remnants...to me it would be no biggie. But I understand the whole dynamic of asking something of a spouse and them being unwilling to change. That's difficult.

m2kbug

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #42 on: September 17, 2013, 01:53:10 PM »
I'm on Marissa's side for a completely different reason.

How old is the garbage disposal? B/c my mother never put apple cores down the disposal for fear of breaking it.

What's easier? Throwing the core in the garbage can or replacing the garbage disposal?

This crossed my mind too.  They must have a really good garbage disposal.  I wouldn't put apple cores through, and more because I would worry about the seeds and stem clogging up the pipes.  These could jam up the blades.  My disposal is pretty new, but it's pretty bottom of the barrel, low budget.  Maybe there are some super sonic great disposals that can grind things up like that.

This could be a useful tool getting the hubs to throw the core into the trash and not the sink. 

Two Ravens

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #43 on: September 17, 2013, 02:04:35 PM »
I'm on Marissa's side for a completely different reason.

How old is the garbage disposal? B/c my mother never put apple cores down the disposal for fear of breaking it.

What's easier? Throwing the core in the garbage can or replacing the garbage disposal?

This crossed my mind too.  They must have a really good garbage disposal.  I wouldn't put apple cores through, and more because I would worry about the seeds and stem clogging up the pipes.  These could jam up the blades.  My disposal is pretty new, but it's pretty bottom of the barrel, low budget.  Maybe there are some super sonic great disposals that can grind things up like that.

This could be a useful tool getting the hubs to throw the core into the trash and not the sink.

I agree with this. I remember reading that you shouldn't put anything down a disposal that you wouldn't chew. So no apple cores, coffee grinds, chicken bones, etc.

Winterlight

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Re: Kitchen Sink Etiquette
« Reply #44 on: September 17, 2013, 02:15:40 PM »
I think Ted is being a jerk. He knows this bugs his wife and continues to do it with the lame excuse that "mom doesn't mind." I don't care if Queen Elizabeth II doesn't mind- his wife, the person he vowed to love, honor and cherish, does. Ted should either toss it in the trash or do the dishes and then dispose of it.
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