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  • July 26, 2017, 07:56:51 PM

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Author Topic: Reading/Book Pet Peeves  (Read 774833 times)

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Dazi

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3480 on: July 21, 2017, 06:24:24 PM »
A percentage of non-readers are going to be dyslexics or people with other reading issues; I worked with someone who had a relative so dyslexic that just trying to do homework was a chore. And there are also still people who are functionally illiterate here in the U.S..

Do you have any source for supporting the cause and effect? We talked about dyslexia in education courses, but the condition was just becoming recognized, so there was little information. My husband is dyslexic but is able to compensate for math and science but hates to read for pleasure. He reads a lot on the computer, though. The kids and I read a lot.

So, does he not like to read because of dyslexia, or is he dyslexic because he doesn't read, or does he just not see the point of reading for pleasure so doesn't bother? (I personally think a combination of the first and last, but with no research to back me up.)

No. Dyslexia is not caused by insufficient practice reading.

It is a neurological difference that makes it more difficult for the brain to connect abstract symbols to sounds and meaning.

Here is a helpful site from Yale University. http://dyslexia.yale.edu/whatisdyslexia.html

Most dyslexic people adapt by creating strategies that help them, even without intervention, but reading the written word is more work (and therefore less likely to be relaxing & fun).

Audiobooks, however, are a great resource and do really "count" as reading, because as far as pleasure-reading goes, they operate in the brain almost exactly the same. (They're not as effective for studying and retention for most people, but we're just talking about enjoying stories here).

I think it highly depends on the person. Both my brother and I are severely dyslexic. I LOVE to read for pleasure, but my brother hates it.

I also think it depends on HOW you learned to read. I learned to read from my dad (also severely dyslexic) by learning whole words. I learned to recognize the groups of letters in a word, regardless of their order, by my dad reading aloud and pointing to each word as he read it. I also learned to read prior to starting school. My brother on the other hand, didn't learn to read that way. He didn't start learning to read until after he was in first grade. At that time, schools had switched from whole word reading to phonics. To this day, I don't understand how phonics works. I cannot sound out words. The whole concept is bizarre to me.
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EllenS

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3481 on: July 21, 2017, 06:59:39 PM »
A percentage of non-readers are going to be dyslexics or people with other reading issues; I worked with someone who had a relative so dyslexic that just trying to do homework was a chore. And there are also still people who are functionally illiterate here in the U.S..

Do you have any source for supporting the cause and effect? We talked about dyslexia in education courses, but the condition was just becoming recognized, so there was little information. My husband is dyslexic but is able to compensate for math and science but hates to read for pleasure. He reads a lot on the computer, though. The kids and I read a lot.

So, does he not like to read because of dyslexia, or is he dyslexic because he doesn't read, or does he just not see the point of reading for pleasure so doesn't bother? (I personally think a combination of the first and last, but with no research to back me up.)

No. Dyslexia is not caused by insufficient practice reading.

It is a neurological difference that makes it more difficult for the brain to connect abstract symbols to sounds and meaning.

Here is a helpful site from Yale University. http://dyslexia.yale.edu/whatisdyslexia.html

Most dyslexic people adapt by creating strategies that help them, even without intervention, but reading the written word is more work (and therefore less likely to be relaxing & fun).

Audiobooks, however, are a great resource and do really "count" as reading, because as far as pleasure-reading goes, they operate in the brain almost exactly the same. (They're not as effective for studying and retention for most people, but we're just talking about enjoying stories here).

I think it highly depends on the person. Both my brother and I are severely dyslexic. I LOVE to read for pleasure, but my brother hates it.

I also think it depends on HOW you learned to read. I learned to read from my dad (also severely dyslexic) by learning whole words. I learned to recognize the groups of letters in a word, regardless of their order, by my dad reading aloud and pointing to each word as he read it. I also learned to read prior to starting school. My brother on the other hand, didn't learn to read that way. He didn't start learning to read until after he was in first grade. At that time, schools had switched from whole word reading to phonics. To this day, I don't understand how phonics works. I cannot sound out words. The whole concept is bizarre to me.

That's very interesting! If it's not too much of a tangent: if you were aleady reading before school age, how did your dyslexia get recognized?

GreenHall

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3482 on: July 21, 2017, 07:37:24 PM »
I cannot remember seeing my mother without an open book in her hand.  I expect my daughter would say the same about me!  When I left home she gave me some advice.  'Don't try a read when you are doing the ironing or cutting potatoes for chips - I bear the scars to prove it'.  Excellent advice I immediately gave up ironing.

One of my siblings has dyslexia, audible books have been a boon for them, and they are slowly catching up to the rest of us.

One of the joys of living in a small town is that everybody knew to look out for my daughter and her cousin who would often walk home after school reading a book.
Well I, for one, think you learned the right thing from your mother's experience!

iridaceae

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3483 on: July 21, 2017, 08:20:01 PM »
This was also 35 years ago. I'm sure there are better tools now.
Nothing to see here.

Chez Miriam

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3484 on: July 22, 2017, 08:20:02 AM »
I cannot remember seeing my mother without an open book in her hand.  I expect my daughter would say the same about me!  When I left home she gave me some advice.  'Don't try a read when you are doing the ironing or cutting potatoes for chips - I bear the scars to prove it'.  Excellent advice I immediately gave up ironing.

One of my siblings has dyslexia, audible books have been a boon for them, and they are slowly catching up to the rest of us.

One of the joys of living in a small town is that everybody knew to look out for my daughter and her cousin who would often walk home after school reading a book.
Well I, for one, think you learned the right thing from your mother's experience!

POD! ;D
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LondonAngel

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3485 on: Yesterday at 02:07:19 PM »
books written in the first person, i just can't deal with it. once of the reasons i struggled with the hunger games trilogy

Writer of Wrongs

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3486 on: Today at 10:15:41 AM »
books written in the first person, i just can't deal with it. once of the reasons i struggled with the hunger games trilogy

I struggle with this, too. I think part of it, for me, is that it immediately kills some of the tension. I like mysteries and thrillers, and if the story is told in the first person, they obviously survived. Or else it's told by their ghost, which annoys me.  >:( I really don't know why; it just makes me grumpy.  ::) ;D
(One exception to that was The Life I Left Behind, by Colette McBeth - I actually enjoyed that one, because after the narrator realizes she's dead, she has to figure out who killed her, and why. It also shifted between the first person dead narrator, and a third person voice talking about the living.)

Chez Miriam

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3487 on: Today at 11:25:30 AM »
Setting a book in London, when it seems that your main inspiration is having watched Mary Poppins!

By the mid-late 1980s it was extremely rare to see businessmen in stiff black suits with black umbrellas [a very few "old school" men in the City or company chairmen].  Sure, many work dark/sombre suits, but not black in stiff fabric, and by then a lot of the men carrying brollies had golf ones - so brighly-coloured.  I don't think I ever saw [in London] a bowler hat that wasn't on a drayman!  I think they are worn by racecourse stewards and some County Show judges...  But those people tend not to throng the streets of the City.

Similarly, the Clean Air Act of 1956 had put paid to roaring fires in pubs, and most of the dense fog swirling round outside them.

And the idea that at the end of a lane in Margate there would be a row of mailboxes for householders' mail made me laugh out loud.  [Off topic: does that sort of thing exist in the US?  Can anyone just go and look at a person's mail (as the heroine did in the book)?]  In the UK almost every home has a letterbox (actually a slot in the front door), and mail is pushed through that into the house/flat, although I think a few of the newer developments might have locked mailboxes in the lobby now [but I could be confusing that with Spain/France]?  Certainly nowhere [in the UK] that I have lived had an external mailbox; to look through my correspondence, you would have to break into my home.

I will allow that there are still quite a few cobbled streets [actually setts, not cobbles], but the rest is adding together to seem that 'I watched a 1950s film or two'!
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artk2002

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3488 on: Today at 12:28:14 PM »
[Off topic: does that sort of thing exist in the US?  Can anyone just go and look at a person's mail (as the heroine did in the book)?]

Yes and no. Having a single delivery point with individual boxes is very common now, especially with new development. The carrier only goes to one spot to deliver the mail, rather than to each house/unit. These all have individual keys on the boxes while the carrier has a master key that opens the whole thing. The heroine would have to have a key to read the mail (or be good with a lock pick.)
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Kariachi

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3489 on: Today at 12:29:39 PM »

And the idea that at the end of a lane in Margate there would be a row of mailboxes for householders' mail made me laugh out loud.  [Off topic: does that sort of thing exist in the US?  Can anyone just go and look at a person's mail (as the heroine did in the book)?]

Mostly you get groups of locked mailboxes, but a lane down the street from my place does in fact have that exact thing. They're rarer, and more a country thing than a city thing, but they are a thing out here.
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Winterlight

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3490 on: Today at 12:48:58 PM »

And the idea that at the end of a lane in Margate there would be a row of mailboxes for householders' mail made me laugh out loud.  [Off topic: does that sort of thing exist in the US?  Can anyone just go and look at a person's mail (as the heroine did in the book)?]

Mostly you get groups of locked mailboxes, but a lane down the street from my place does in fact have that exact thing. They're rarer, and more a country thing than a city thing, but they are a thing out here.

I grew up in a rural area and most of our neighbors had mailboxes at the bottom of the hill. Our road was very steep and there were few houses along it back then. They were not locked, though I believe they are now. Newspaper boxes also used to be down at the bottom of the hill, but have been moved to the individual driveways in the last few years.

We did not have a mailbox, mom and dad preferred to have a PO box because if you had a package you'd have to go down there and get it anyway (anything bigger than a breadbox wouldn't fit in your individual box. Also anything perishable wouldn't have been safe since temperatures range during the course of the year from -60F to 90+F.)
« Last Edit: Today at 01:15:41 PM by Winterlight »
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wolfie

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3491 on: Today at 02:55:40 PM »
  [Off topic: does that sort of thing exist in the US?  Can anyone just go and look at a person's mail (as the heroine did in the book)?]

yes - where i live mailboxes are by the driveway and if I wanted to I could go from mailbox to mailbox and look at everyone's mail.

iridaceae

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #3492 on: Today at 05:05:52 PM »
Individual mailboxes down by the street are very common here in Tucson. No key needed.
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