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  • February 08, 2016, 04:25:18 PM

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Author Topic: Listening to instincts  (Read 10856 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #90 on: January 27, 2016, 10:07:01 AM »
Seems to work both ways, too.  BF has dogs.  Three at the time we met, now four.  They are all Barky McBarkersons - small dogs.  And the female can be downright scary, though it comes more from timidness rather than aggression, I think.  Within an hour, she stopped barking at me and all of them don't bark at me when I come into their space through a closed door, except very occasionally, if they are startled because they didn't hear me on the other side of the door.  He was pretty impressed, especially since I am not really a dog person.  Most of them love me but generally, I like my dogs the way I like my children.  They're great, as long as they are someone else's.   ;D  So much for that!

We figure the female will end up as 'my' dog, once we get more settled and can spend more time with them.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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Thipu1

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #91 on: February 06, 2016, 12:24:49 PM »
Sometimes, you meet someone who seems perfectly fine to everybody else but the Hinky Meter starts going off.  I've had that happen twice.

The first was an extremely charming Assyriologist who was a visiting professor at NYU.  He was Hungarian but lived in South Africa and was usually dressed for 'High Tea on the Rhino Hunt'.    He spent a lot of time sketching in the galleries and was always happy to give visiting school children a lesson in reading cuneiform.  Everyone loved him but, when he was around with his Graduate Assistant, the theme from 'Jaws' started playing in my head. Something was not quite hitting on all cylinders.

  Sure enough, one day he disappeared without a trace.  We later learned that he had been stalking the Graduate Assistant.  She figured it out when he knocked on the door of her apartment at 3AM. 

The other was a man for whom I felt rather sorry. He professed to have been a seminary student in Sicily, the owner of many successful businesses that went bankrupt. According to him, he had made and lost several fortunes. He was entertaining but not at all reliable.  Over my protest he was engaged as a volunteer in the library. This guy was always flat broke but full of wonderful schemes to make big money.  He wanted me to contribute to the cause. I never did.

We lost contact for a few years. I last heard from him via a Christmas card that presented himself as a Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. He wasn't dangerous like the stalker but I wanted nothing to do with him. 

iridaceae

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #92 on: Yesterday at 05:20:19 AM »
Animal instincts are all very fine and well but they aren't exactly infallible. I knew a cat who hated his human's boyfriend. Why? Because the only other male he'd ever known was the vet. So male=vet to the kitty.  When I was a kid a neighbor's house got broken into and the family's dog sat quietly and did nothing. Earlier in the year they'd held a dinner party and the dog would not stop barking at neighbors he'd known from puppyhood.
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JustEstelle

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #93 on: Yesterday at 04:40:13 PM »
One summer I was living about 200 miles away from my parents.  I woke up one Sunday morning with this feeling of dread related to my parents.  I called that morning to check in with my parents and asked if things were okay.  My mom insisted that everything was fine.  I tried to go on about my day, but I couldn't shake the feeling of dread.  I called again to check in; things were fine.  When, by late afternoon, the feeling of dread had only increased for me, I called and told my parents that I was going to come home for a few days.  I'd already visited them about two or three weeks previously and, for all Mom knew, things were fine.  She seemed a little annoyed by my insistence that things weren't right, but she and Dad told me to come on up and I'd be welcome.

The next morning, Mom came into my room at daybreak and asked me to get up, get dressed, and drive her and Dad to the ER, as Dad was having some "issues."  He wound up being hospitalized and having prostate surgery a couple of days later.  If I hadn't been there, I'm not sure what they'd have done, as Mom didn't drive and Dad wouldn't have been able to do so in the state he was in.  After we got Dad safely admitted, the feeling of dread left me.

Luci

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #94 on: Yesterday at 08:16:03 PM »
We had been friends with a couple for 35 years and visited them every year - a 600 mile trip one way. Our kids practically grew up together.

We were all around 60 years old, and we had been out for our spring visit and I was scheduled for surgery in November. Suddenly in September we decided to go see them again with 2 day's notice. When we got there. Jim announced that he had cancer and less than six months to live. He had been diagnosed three days earlier.

We had a nice weekend somehow. He died just before my surgery. Lucas was there for me, then our daughter came to stay with me and our son took Lucas to the funeral.

The memory of that last weekend is still precious to us.

Firecat

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #95 on: Yesterday at 08:50:29 PM »
Animal instincts are all very fine and well but they aren't exactly infallible. I knew a cat who hated his human's boyfriend. Why? Because the only other male he'd ever known was the vet. So male=vet to the kitty.  When I was a kid a neighbor's house got broken into and the family's dog sat quietly and did nothing. Earlier in the year they'd held a dinner party and the dog would not stop barking at neighbors he'd known from puppyhood.

That's where knowing your pet comes in. I wouldn't put that level of trust in the instincts of an animal I didn't know. In the case of my friend's cat, I'd lived with the cat for a year by the time I started dating now-DH, and observed her behavior with a couple of guys my friend dated. They're no more infallible than we are, but sometimes they do pick up on things we don't!

We used to have a dog who was very smart, and whose instincts were normally good. But she did not like people who smoked, or at least took a long time to warm up to them. The reason for this was that one of my uncles (who was actually a good guy) was talking to my Dad, had his hand down by his side, with a lighted cigarette between his fingers. The dog (who was a puppy at the time), sniffed it and got a small burn on the end of her nose. And after that, if she smelled tobacco smoke on a person...they were not in her good graces. So it's about knowing your pet, what behavior is usual, and what isn't.

Sirius

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #96 on: Yesterday at 11:37:04 PM »
It was very strange for our beagle to refuse to allow someone to come near her, let alone pet her.  She was very friendly to everyone else.  My cat was the same way; he didn't care who petted him, but if he refused to go near someone it got my attention.  As was said earlier, it comes from knowing your pet.  Right now my indoor cats are all fairly skittish with strangers, so I wouldn't see them diving under the bed when a repair person, etc. comes by as anything to be concerned about.   

greencat

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #97 on: Today at 10:34:58 AM »
I instantly disliked a woman I was introduced to by friends.  She started dating a very good friend of mine, so I resolved to tolerate her.  Over some hesitation on my part, we let her stay in our hotel room for a big event when her original roommate had a family emergency.  She managed to prove my instincts correct - she was a constant fount of drama and negativity during the whole event.  Good friend broke up with her shortly afterward.

SDG31000

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #98 on: Today at 11:55:02 AM »
When my DS1 was 6 weeks old I took him out shopping using the baby carrier to avoid trying to get the pram on and off the bus.  He seemed a bit off and upset when we got home, but I put it down to my waking him up to get him out of the carrier.

Over the next few hours he got more and more grumpy, refused to feed and his temperature went up.  Being a new Mom I wasn't sure what to do and phoned the out of hours Doctor service.  The Doctor told he to sponge him down and give him water and that he wasn't going to come out to see DS1.

Something told me that DS1 wasn't well, that I wasn't been a paranoid first time Mom and that I should take him to see a Doctor asap.  Luckily our GP had a Saturday surgery and I put DS1 in the pram and was on the doorstep when it opened, leaving DH in bed as he had been up most of the night.  The GP took DS1's temp and checked him over and told him to go home, pack a bag and go straight to the hospital.

DS1 was diagnosed with Meningitis an hour later and was in isolation being pumped full of drugs by the time DH had made it to the hospital.

To this day I want to get my hands on the Dr that refused to come out and check DS1 and DS1 is 20 now.

Bexx27

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #99 on: Today at 02:01:06 PM »
Animal instincts are all very fine and well but they aren't exactly infallible. I knew a cat who hated his human's boyfriend. Why? Because the only other male he'd ever known was the vet. So male=vet to the kitty.  When I was a kid a neighbor's house got broken into and the family's dog sat quietly and did nothing. Earlier in the year they'd held a dinner party and the dog would not stop barking at neighbors he'd known from puppyhood.

My parents' dog enthusiastically loves everyone she's ever met, with one exception - my  uncle. She is terrified of him. I've known him my whole life and I'm pretty comfortable saying he's a perfectly decent person. I guess it's possible he'll turn out to be a secret serial killer some day, but it's also possible that pets are just weird sometimes.
How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these. -George Washington Carver

Klein Bottle

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Re: Listening to instincts
« Reply #100 on: Today at 03:25:01 PM »
When my DS1 was 6 weeks old I took him out shopping using the baby carrier to avoid trying to get the pram on and off the bus.  He seemed a bit off and upset when we got home, but I put it down to my waking him up to get him out of the carrier.

Over the next few hours he got more and more grumpy, refused to feed and his temperature went up.  Being a new Mom I wasn't sure what to do and phoned the out of hours Doctor service.  The Doctor told he to sponge him down and give him water and that he wasn't going to come out to see DS1.

Something told me that DS1 wasn't well, that I wasn't been a paranoid first time Mom and that I should take him to see a Doctor asap.  Luckily our GP had a Saturday surgery and I put DS1 in the pram and was on the doorstep when it opened, leaving DH in bed as he had been up most of the night.  The GP took DS1's temp and checked him over and told him to go home, pack a bag and go straight to the hospital.

DS1 was diagnosed with Meningitis an hour later and was in isolation being pumped full of drugs by the time DH had made it to the hospital.

To this day I want to get my hands on the Dr that refused to come out and check DS1 and DS1 is 20 now.

I'm so glad and grateful that your baby boy is okay! (I realize he's a grown man, but, you know what I mean!) That's incredibly scary.
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