Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 52667 times)

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VorFemme

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #255 on: September 27, 2013, 04:16:54 PM »

How do you pronounce the following word.




POLISH


(Is it "polish" or "polish"?  No way to tell - according to Isaac Asimov.)

If it's Polish and therefore related to the country, it should be capitalised and pronounced Poe-lish  (Rhyming with Edgar Allen's surname).  "Kabanos is a Polish sausage."

If it's polish and means putting a shine on something, then uncapitalised and pronounced poll-ish, with the 'o' sound the very short one you get in the name Polly. "Polish your shoes! They're dirty."

I don't really see Azimov's problem.  Scratches head...

(ETA :  We British seldom shine our shoes, btw. We polish, not Polish, them.)

It is written in all caps, with no context to determine how it was used.  How do you pronounce it?

If the context offers a clue - such as a sign on a shoe shine stand would be polish - a sign on a sausage stand would be Polish.

But all caps with NO context - no way to tell.
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cabbagegirl28

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #256 on: September 27, 2013, 04:44:45 PM »
I've made a spelling mistake in something I've posted to Facebook - and I can't edit it. It hurts every time I see it.

Facebook is going to be rolling out the ability to edit statuses.  In order to keep people from posting "I love kitties!" and then, after garnering tons of "likes", editing it to say "I kick puppies" the status will show "has been edited" and people can click to see the previous tpyos.

Which is great because there's nothing like posting, enjoying the "likes" and chatting with friends only to notice hours later a glaring typo, missing capitalization or even missing words.

Good. I don't know why they didn't just do that when they gave that capability to comments on statuses/posts.


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pwv

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #257 on: September 27, 2013, 05:53:00 PM »
Another one:

LEAD


Is it pronounced leed or led.

jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #258 on: September 28, 2013, 03:35:39 PM »
Another one:

LEAD


Is it pronounced leed or led.

Both, depending on usage. Led = lead pencil. Lead = playing a lead in a play.

VorFemme

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #259 on: September 28, 2013, 03:52:17 PM »
Another one:

LEAD


Is it pronounced leed or led.

Both, depending on usage. Led = lead pencil. Lead = playing a lead in a play.

The "riddle" part of the question is that you can't tell WHICH way to pronounce certain words without "context" - whether it is the rest of a sentence, whether or not the first letter is capitalized, or even what the one word sign is posted on.

There have been several previous examples in this thread - this is just one more.

Did I read the joke below HERE or elsewhere?

How do you tell the difference between a PLUMBER and a chemist?

Ask them to pronounce "unionized".

Plumber will probably see it as related to union, so union-ized, while a chemist will most likely see it as un-ionized.

Mom was a science teacher....I need to send that one to her...
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Tini

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #260 on: September 28, 2013, 04:15:24 PM »
And of course, there's READING - either my former home town (pronounced redding) or the obvious one.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #261 on: September 28, 2013, 07:00:13 PM »
Except any good chemist would know it's DE-ionized, not un-ionized, which unfortunately ruins the joke  :-\

VorFemme

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #262 on: September 28, 2013, 07:01:17 PM »
Except any good chemist would know it's DE-ionized, not un-ionized, which unfortunately ruins the joke  :-\

Dang nab it - but now I'm glad I DIDN'T send it to Mom!
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mrs_deb

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #263 on: September 28, 2013, 09:01:39 PM »
Although I don't correct my dad, some of the things he says drive me batty.  Example:

fillum - film


...does he like The Three Stooges?

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #264 on: September 29, 2013, 10:52:22 AM »
I had an aunt who drove everybody nuts.

She would say 'fillum', 'chimbly' and 'liberry'.  She also never had a 'snack' she had a 'smack'. 

It was a bit of a family mystery because her sisters received the same education in the same school and none of them spoke that way. 


VorFemme

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #265 on: September 29, 2013, 11:59:13 AM »
I had an aunt who drove everybody nuts.

She would say 'fillum', 'chimbly' and 'liberry'.  She also never had a 'snack' she had a 'smack'. 

It was a bit of a family mystery because her sisters received the same education in the same school and none of them spoke that way. 



Slight hearing loss so that she really HEARD things that way?  Or a "lazy tongue"?
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123sandy

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #266 on: September 29, 2013, 12:18:06 PM »
Fillum is quite natural for the North of Scotland.

Please add "spaded" as in had our dog spade or spaded.  :(

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #267 on: September 29, 2013, 12:37:08 PM »
And of course, there's READING - either my former home town (pronounced redding) or the obvious one.

Utterly dreadful and feeble English joke / riddle.  Reading, England, is the county town ("capital") of the English county of Berkshire -- pronounced as your home town, Tini -- don't know whether you're in America or UK.  Said idiotic riddle basically doesn't work "spoken"; only "written / read".

Q: Which is the most studious county in England?

A: Berkshire; because there is a town in it which is always Reading.

Said riddle came in a book which I owned as a kid -- " A Thousand Conundrums / Riddles".  Believe me, even among a thousand of them, that one was scraping the barrel.

jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #268 on: September 29, 2013, 01:19:56 PM »
My X was intelligent and well educated, but he did manage to mangle some words (his parents were the king and queen of mangling the language!)
Some examples: birfday for birthday, wood-ent for wouldn't.

And some of the comments reminded me of how many people say and spell sherbet "sherbert."  :P

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #269 on: September 29, 2013, 02:49:25 PM »
Except any good chemist would know it's DE-ionized, not un-ionized, which unfortunately ruins the joke  :-\

Dang nab it - but now I'm glad I DIDN'T send it to Mom!

I would use un-ionized occasionally when referring to particular valances of elements.  I would use de-ionized when referring to water treated to remove ionized chemical components.  In aqueous solution, most things are ionized.

(Biochemist here)
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