Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 67869 times)

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Danika

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #360 on: April 06, 2014, 03:08:59 AM »
Rather than paraphrase the good explanation that I read on another site. I'll just copy and paste the explanation here:

...Sat is the past simple and past participle of the verb "to sit", which implies an action that only the subject can do on itself, nobody else but the subject of the sentence. So, you sat a customer on table 40, for example, is totally wrong, as one only sits oneself! However, I seated the customer, as you said, is right, because you are using the verb "to seat" as a transtive verb to indicate that you are the one who actually seated somebody else (took somebody to their seat). Sit can only be used against yourself, you sit on a chair, for instance. You simply cannot "sit somebody on a chair"! Therefore, in past form, they cannot be "sat" by you.

Basically seated and sat are from different verbs: the first one is "to sit" and the other one is "to seat"; just think of them like this: to sit oneself; to be seated.

I hate it when I hear people say "I was sat there"... it's ridiculous! You either say "I sat there", or you say "I was seated there". It's actually very simple when you think about it, people tend to hear these errors and they get stuck in their brains and become normal discourse.. let's protect the English language!!

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #361 on: April 06, 2014, 03:34:43 AM »
Rather than paraphrase the good explanation that I read on another site. I'll just copy and paste the explanation here:

...Sat is the past simple and past participle of the verb "to sit", which implies an action that only the subject can do on itself, nobody else but the subject of the sentence. So, you sat a customer on table 40, for example, is totally wrong, as one only sits oneself! However, I seated the customer, as you said, is right, because you are using the verb "to seat" as a transtive verb to indicate that you are the one who actually seated somebody else (took somebody to their seat). Sit can only be used against yourself, you sit on a chair, for instance. You simply cannot "sit somebody on a chair"! Therefore, in past form, they cannot be "sat" by you.

Basically seated and sat are from different verbs: the first one is "to sit" and the other one is "to seat"; just think of them like this: to sit oneself; to be seated.

I hate it when I hear people say "I was sat there"... it's ridiculous! You either say "I sat there", or you say "I was seated there". It's actually very simple when you think about it, people tend to hear these errors and they get stuck in their brains and become normal discourse.. let's protect the English language!!


This explanation is founded on the "fact" that "sit" is always an intransitive verb, i.e., that one can sit, but cannot sit someone/something else. A lot of dictionaries disagree. For example, Merriam-Webster online (defs. 1 and 4 under transitive verb, as I quoted before), Oxford English Dictionary (def. 23 with examples as far back as the 15th century, as well as from notable authors like Dickens), dictionary.com (def. 16), Cambridge Dictionaries Online (transitive definition marked by [T]). All of these list transitive usages of the verb "sit," and all include definitions that would apply to seating a customer in a restaurant. You can dislike the usage all you like, but that doesn't make it wrong.

Hillia

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #362 on: April 13, 2014, 09:44:45 PM »
The acronym for the set of federal regulations regarding patient confidentiality and other issues is HIPAA.  Not HIPPA.  If you work in health care, you need to know this and use it properly.

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Gogi

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #363 on: April 13, 2014, 11:30:20 PM »

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.



Hyphens, too.  ;)

bansidhe

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #364 on: April 14, 2014, 02:04:28 AM »

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.



Hyphens, too.  ;)

LOLOL! In my fury, I didn't even notice.  :D
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BeagleMommy

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #365 on: April 15, 2014, 01:32:52 PM »
To quote Judge Judy, "There is no such word as 'tooken'."

Xandraea

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #366 on: April 15, 2014, 01:40:04 PM »
To quote Judge Judy, "There is no such word as 'tooken'."

or "broughten"!   -- as defined by urban dictionary: "Another piece of ... backwards, street slang that is slowly helping to erode proper English usage, grammar and meaningful and intelligent communication."

VorFemme

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #367 on: April 16, 2014, 06:25:20 PM »
Or "conversated"

Nobody can "borrow" you anything they own, either.  You can borrow it, they can loan it.  But they can't "borrow" their own possessions.

And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.
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pwv

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #368 on: April 16, 2014, 10:08:19 PM »
people who use  costumer  when they mean  customer.


Nikko-chan

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #369 on: April 17, 2014, 02:00:02 AM »
Or "conversated"

Nobody can "borrow" you anything they own, either.  You can borrow it, they can loan it.  But they can't "borrow" their own possessions.

And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

Oh yes. I think that is my biggest one ever. It makes me cringe.

squeakers

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #370 on: April 17, 2014, 02:20:47 AM »


Nobody can "borrow" you anything they own, either.  You can borrow it, they can loan it.  But they can't "borrow" their own possessions.


I think that one has been covered before... it's a colloquialism. http://www.folklib.net/history/scansin.shtml
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mrs_deb

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #371 on: April 17, 2014, 11:46:17 AM »
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"

jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #372 on: April 17, 2014, 12:27:58 PM »
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"

I remember those ads! Drove me crazy.  :P

Elfmama

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #373 on: April 17, 2014, 04:47:47 PM »
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"
Might be Gary himself doing the ad.  I've seen several in the Baltimore market where the spokesperson is the advertiser's mother or daughter or granddaughter.  ::)

And then there was one for the National Aquarium where the spokesman had a pseudo-French accent.  The aquarium's website is aqua.org, but the spokesman sounded like he was saying acquire.org.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2014, 04:50:24 PM by Elfmama »
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whatsanenigma

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #374 on: April 18, 2014, 05:38:04 PM »

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.



Hyphens, too.  ;)

LOLOL! In my fury, I didn't even notice.  :D

On a related note, it bugs me when people describe a baby as being "one years old" or as a "one-years-old".  I realize, it's probably just habit, because all the higher numbers for years of age do require the plural, but it's just a little twitchy thing for me.