Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 44730 times)

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jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #375 on: April 18, 2014, 08:18:57 PM »
And the next person over the age of six (who might be still learning some sounds in English) who "axes" me a question is going to be ignored - because I really, truly hate that usage with a pink & purple pin-striped passion.

I cranked about that very thing on Facebook when I was in Florida this winter. 

"So there's a commercial down here for a company called "1-800-ASK-GARY" - a lawyer/doctor referral service. When you have an accident, they want you to dial 1-800-ASK-GARY before speaking to your insurance company, bla bla bla. So why in the name of all that's holy do they have a spokesman who pronounces it as "1-800-AKS-GARY"? Nobody was available for the commercial that actually speaks freakin English?"
Might be Gary himself doing the ad.  I've seen several in the Baltimore market where the spokesperson is the advertiser's mother or daughter or granddaughter.  ::)

And then there was one for the National Aquarium where the spokesman had a pseudo-French accent.  The aquarium's website is aqua.org, but the spokesman sounded like he was saying acquire.org.

IIRC, the ads use different people who are, supposedly, satisfied clients.

baglady

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #376 on: April 18, 2014, 10:35:19 PM »
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

It will never be acceptable to me, and I will continue to shoot it on sight.
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Elfmama

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #377 on: April 18, 2014, 11:09:31 PM »
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

It will never be acceptable to me, and I will continue to shoot it on sight.
I think it should also be open season on "liberry" and "chimbley" and "tempchur." 

Also pitcher. A pitcher is a container for holding and pouring liquids.   It is NOT that representational art that hangs on the wall.  That is a picture.

 
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violinp

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #378 on: April 18, 2014, 11:11:25 PM »
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

It will never be acceptable to me, and I will continue to shoot it on sight.
I think it should also be open season on "liberry" and "chimbley" and "tempchur.

Also pitcher. A pitcher is a container for holding and pouring liquids.   It is NOT that representational art that hangs on the wall.  That is a picture.

 

What about "temp - a - chur"? 'Cause that's how I've always said it with my twang.
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jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #379 on: April 20, 2014, 07:27:07 AM »
I have recently seen "inbox me." This trend of making non-verbs into verbs is getting old. Yes, I realize that language evolves, but in some cases I think it devolves!

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #380 on: April 20, 2014, 07:59:27 AM »
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.

knitwicca

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #381 on: April 20, 2014, 10:17:26 AM »
My ex husband used "irregardless" on a regular basis. He enjoyed seeing me twitch.

It seems few people understand "flammable" and "inflammable" share the same meaning.


DanaJ

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #382 on: April 20, 2014, 10:30:22 AM »
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.

jmarvellous

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #383 on: April 20, 2014, 11:09:57 AM »
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.

"More than" is for things greater in number; "over" is for things on top of or surpassing/after other things.
Some friends (editors, all) and I were coming up with song lyrics and titles that would not work with the alternative inserted:

"Over Words"
"Over a Feeling"
"Head More Than Heels"
"Bridge More Than Troubled Water"
"Somewhere More Than the Rainbow"
"It Ain't More Than Till it's More Than."
"Happy Christmas (War is More Than)"
"Over This"

The confusing or overlapping (and still incorrect, in my books--and by that I mean the books I edit) usage comes with things like "over 50 years old," which should always be "more than 50 years old."

Liliane

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #384 on: April 20, 2014, 11:17:00 AM »
The Associated Press has declared that "over" is now an accepted alternative to "more than" in all uses.

I've never seen this, do you have an example?

Proofreading is an integral part of my job function. The most common mistakes I see are abuses of the apostrophe and capitalization issues. One thing that makes me utterly crazy however is the use of "addicting" where "addictive" should be.

"Heroin is an addictive drug."

"These potato chips are so addicting!" unless the chips are currently injecting a drug like heroin into their little potato veins and are in the process of becoming addicts, then no.

"More than" is for things greater in number; "over" is for things on top of or surpassing/after other things.
Some friends (editors, all) and I were coming up with song lyrics and titles that would not work with the alternative inserted:

"Over Words"
"Over a Feeling"
"Head More Than Heels"
"Bridge More Than Troubled Water"
"Somewhere More Than the Rainbow"
"It Ain't More Than Till it's More Than."
"Happy Christmas (War is More Than)"
"Over This"

The confusing or overlapping (and still incorrect, in my books--and by that I mean the books I edit) usage comes with things like "over 50 years old," which should always be "more than 50 years old."

That drives me up the wall too, and even more so because sometimes I'm not sure which one to use!

(Those all remind me of newspaper headlines, too... ;D)
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jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #385 on: April 20, 2014, 11:33:41 AM »
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.

You're absolutely correct. Sometimes I just feel grumpy about things I read online.  8)

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #386 on: April 20, 2014, 01:36:30 PM »
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.

You're absolutely correct. Sometimes I just feel grumpy about things I read online.  8)

For sure -- plenty of things that I read on line, make me feel grumpy or worse...!

jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #387 on: April 20, 2014, 02:07:34 PM »
I won't deny that "making non-verbs into verbs" can be annoying, and feel highly unnecessary; but I gather this is something of an instance of "nothing new under the sun".  I've read that writings from the Elizabethan-and-shortly-thereafter period, show a tendency in that direction, then -- such things as one's being said to "happy" one's friend, or "malice" one's enemy.  Maybe there are times and general milieux when linguistic innovations are apt to run riot; and intervening periods when things settle down, and the crazier neologisms tend to die out.

It's generally accepted that -- as above -- in England in the late 16th / early 17th century, Shakespeare and co. were having wonderful fun trying and seeing what clever and innovative things could be done with the language; and that some of such failed to catch on with said language's users, and died a natural death.

You're absolutely correct. Sometimes I just feel grumpy about things I read online.  8)

For sure -- plenty of things that I read on line, make me feel grumpy or worse...!

It's part of being human, I guess.  :)

Bijou

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #388 on: April 20, 2014, 05:48:47 PM »
Most of the time it doesn't bother me, but if someone is holding forth as knowledgeable about something and they make mistakes like using their instead of there I have to wonder about how much I can trust their information. 
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Mary Lennox

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #389 on: April 20, 2014, 06:01:44 PM »
I'm having an ongoing debate with the lady who sends out the birthday announcements at work. She asks me to check the emails to make sure they are correct. I told her the wording was fine, but having every second or third word start with a capital looked weird. She said because it was an announcement, capitalising random words was okay.

No it's not okay. Capital letters belong to proper nouns, the start of a sentence and shouting on the internet.