Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 44061 times)

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Giraffe, Esq

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #405 on: April 25, 2014, 03:54:54 PM »
"Reign" for "rein" is making me crazy.

I suppose the problem is that most people no longer ride or drive horses, so metaphors like "taking the reins" or "giving free rein" no longer resonate. Instead, they realize those terms have something to do with control, and "reign" is control, right? So, they give people free reign to take the reigns.

It's bad enough in daily writings, but when I saw it show up in "Ironman" I wanted to cry. Do they not use proofreaders?

Yes!  There's an ad in the train and bus stations around here, for Crown Royal, that has a slogan about knowing "when to reign in and when to reign on".  No no no no no!!!  It's rein in!  Makes me twitch every time I see it.

BeagleMommy

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #406 on: April 25, 2014, 04:29:56 PM »
Cuff, cuff, cuff!  This is what I wanted to yell at the two women discussing one's "rotator cup" tear.

jaxsue

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #407 on: April 25, 2014, 05:18:16 PM »
I saw this on a Facebook feed this week: fist of cuffs.  :o

Danika

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #408 on: April 25, 2014, 06:59:58 PM »
Aaak. Rotator cup tear and fist of cuffs.

I had a friend from high school who graduated a few years before me and he joined the US Army. When he came back to visit, he wore a hat that said "U.S. Cavalry" but he kept insisting that he was a member of the Calvary. When I pronounced it "Cavalry" he would tell me I was wrong, so I gave up.

Mikayla

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #409 on: April 26, 2014, 07:47:02 PM »
"I'm going too the store"

"I'm to tired too care".

Honestly, if they could fix this one thing, my Twitch Quotient would get cut in half on the spot.

(I may have mentioned this earlier, but at that point I think it was "your" vs "you're.)

Liliane

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #410 on: April 26, 2014, 07:58:21 PM »
"I'm going too the store"

"I'm to tired too care".

Honestly, if they could fix this one thing, my Twitch Quotient would get cut in half on the spot.

(I may have mentioned this earlier, but at that point I think it was "your" vs "you're.)

This reminds me of a picture I saw once...

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch!


Mikayla

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #411 on: April 26, 2014, 08:08:33 PM »
Ok, I seriously cracked up at "thank you for your interest in the Internet". 

Can I snag that?

Liliane

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #412 on: April 26, 2014, 08:11:09 PM »
It's not my image, so I don't see why not. :)
Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch!


bansidhe

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #413 on: April 27, 2014, 04:02:44 AM »
I follow a lot of cats on Facebook - as in an embarrassingly large number. Over and over again I see sentences like the following crop up on these pages:

"My cat loves to have his tummy pet."
"Check out what this kitten does when he gets pet."
"She loves to be pet right when I'm trying to leave for work."

Petted.

PETTED.
Esan ozenki!

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violinp

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #414 on: April 27, 2014, 09:44:02 AM »
Cuff, cuff, cuff!  This is what I wanted to yell at the two women discussing one's "rotator cup" tear.

All I'm thinking is OW OW OW.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Thipu1

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #415 on: April 27, 2014, 10:01:08 AM »
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves. 

violinp

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #416 on: April 27, 2014, 04:47:54 PM »
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves.

Um...that's how most people I know (myself included) pronounce interesting. It would sound forced to emphasize the "t." Perhaps it's a Southernism making its way northward?
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Teenyweeny

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #417 on: April 27, 2014, 05:52:02 PM »
'Inner-esting'.  I'm hearing it more and more and it's getting on my nerves.

Um...that's how most people I know (myself included) pronounce interesting. It would sound forced to emphasize the "t." Perhaps it's a Southernism making its way northward?

UK here: I only ever hear 'int-REST-ing', stress on second syllable, or possibly 'in-trest-in', even stress.



Elfmama

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #418 on: April 27, 2014, 11:59:01 PM »
To go with "axed", their partners "excape" and "expresso."  ::)
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VorFemme

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #419 on: April 28, 2014, 02:04:14 PM »
Someone was telling me about going hiking in a state or national where the water source for the sinks in the toilet facilities was clearly labeled as "not potable".  And watching people wash their hands, splash water on their faces, and then DRINK gulps of it from their hands...

Apparently "Not Potable" is not clear labeling to some people.  But "Don't drink the water from the sink faucets" is going to take a much bigger sign and you'll still have people who don't read it because "it's too many words"...yeah, heard that one - someone asked what the sign said & excused themselves for not reading it because it had "too many words".  It was a historical marker explaining the significance of something that happened in that area...and I heard it at more than one historical marker on that trip - not from the same people.

OTOH, there is also the possibility that they understood "not potable" perfectly well and were willing to take the risk anyway. For example, I know of some natural springs that are labeled as not potable, but that people frequently drink from. IME, "not potable" does not necessarily mean dangerous or contaminated, but rather that it is not known (or tested) to be safe for drinking. So it may mean "drink at your own risk" rather than "don't drink".

Also, you mention "watching people wash their hands" in the list of actions demonstrating that they didn't understand the sign. I would take "not potable" on a bathroom sink to mean that I shouldn't avoid ingesting the water, i.e., don't drink it, don't wet my toothbrush with it, and perhaps avoid getting it in other orifaces like the eyes. I wouldn't interpret that as saying it's not safe for hand-washing, unless I had open wounds on my hands. If the water wasn't safe for hand-washing, then why on earth would they pipe it to a restroom sink in the first place? That's the main purpose of a restroom sink!

Handwashing would be normal - splashing my face & risking getting it in my eyes and drinking it would be uses I'd think twice about.  I may not have been clear...

The person who told me about it asked the lady if she knew that the water wasn't "potable" and got a snarky comment back that indicated that she didn't care what the word meant, she was thirsty & hadn't brought any bottled water with her so she was drinking this tap water...I gather that the first woman was a seasoned hiker with her own source of drinking water while the other woman was used to city water that was heavily treated and had no idea what she MIGHT be risking (sulfur in the water, bacteria in the water, or something else that the park service didn't want to be blamed for if people reacted to it once a year when the water in the small lake or pond "turned over" and tasted bad).

Like the woman who didn't want vegetables grown in dirt but the nice clean ones packaged in plastic at the store...the experience of the woman drinking the non-potable water might not have led her to know that not all water goes through a water treatment plant with various filters & sanitizing methods....
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?