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Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 336071 times)

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artk2002

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    • The Delian's Commonwealth
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #495 on: May 20, 2014, 08:50:18 AM »
Just watch the film, it's a light hearted romp with an amazing cast. The bride and Westley are the least interesting, though he's a great sword fighter.

I saw The Princess Bride only because it was the movie on a long distance bus trip.  It was amusing and some of the cameo appearances (especially Billy Crystal) were hilarious. 

the 'Mawwage' sermon reminded me of the old 'Beyond the Fringe' sketch in which the text of the sermon is 'My brother Esau is an hairy man but I am a smooth man'.

You do know, I hope, that the man playing the prelate in Princess Bride was also in Beyond the Fringe? That's Peter Cook. I haven't seen the BYF sketch but it wouldn't surprise me at all if it was Cook in both instances.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #496 on: May 20, 2014, 09:52:29 AM »
Yes. Thank you for the reminder.

Peter Cook was in 'Beyond the Fringe' but, if I recall properly,  the 'My Brother Esau...' sketch in the original was performed by Alan Bennett.  Both performances are hilarious.  I remember going to the show when it was on Broadway.   

You can find the sketch if you type in 'My Brother Esau is an Hairy  Man'.  If you type in 'My Brother Esau' you'll get a song by 'The Grateful Dead'.  That's good but it isn't the same thing.   
« Last Edit: May 20, 2014, 09:57:02 AM by Thipu1 »

GreenHall

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #497 on: May 20, 2014, 12:35:48 PM »
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

I work on a college campus.  At the end of spring term, there were flyers for various apartment complexes around.  One read "Be Apart of Something Great" - it hurt me.

I was gratified on my walk the next day to see that a red pen had been taken to all of the ones on my path :)

Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...
« Last Edit: May 20, 2014, 12:44:28 PM by GreenHall »

Giraffe, Esq

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #498 on: May 20, 2014, 06:00:26 PM »
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

{snip}
Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...

Yeah, in law, we "moot" our arguments before going to appellate court.  In law school, we have "Mock Trial" (competitive teams that do pretend trials) and "Moot Court" (competitive teams that do pretend appeals, with brief and oral arguments). 

Now that I'm practicing, we'll get together to moot our colleagues before an important appellate argument. 

It definitely threw me for a loop at first, but I'm used to using it that way now!

TootsNYC

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #499 on: May 20, 2014, 07:04:22 PM »
I know I saw it mentioned earlier, but the use of good instead of well.  It's like nails on the chalkboard to me.

I'm always afraid to get it wrong. Please, tell me if I'm correct in the following:

Q: How are you doing?
A: Well  <- that's the right answer because it is an adverb that describes "doing"

Q: How are you?
A: Good <- that's the right answer because it's an adjective that describes "I/you"

And the only time you would answer "How are you?" with "well" is if you had been sick for a long time and now you're no longer sick, so you're well again.

Or: "How are you doing?"
         "Well."
         "I'm doing well." (note the verb)
         "I'm good." (note, no verb)
         "I'm well." (note--"well" is also an adjective)

"How are you?"
       "Good."
       "I'm good."
       "I'm doing well."
       "I'm well."


However, note: good is listed in Merriam-Webster's as an adverb. A big usage note, though.

songbird

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #500 on: May 21, 2014, 06:16:43 AM »
Commuter railroad station has turned into a major construction site, the area is getting a complete makeover.

There is a sign hanging on one of the fences asking the public for its understanding during renovation.

The public is requested to "please bare with us . . . ."

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #501 on: May 21, 2014, 07:40:37 AM »
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)

Margo

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #502 on: May 21, 2014, 08:41:42 AM »
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

{snip}
Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...

Yeah, in law, we "moot" our arguments before going to appellate court.  In law school, we have "Mock Trial" (competitive teams that do pretend trials) and "Moot Court" (competitive teams that do pretend appeals, with brief and oral arguments). 

Now that I'm practicing, we'll get together to moot our colleagues before an important appellate argument. 

It definitely threw me for a loop at first, but I'm used to using it that way now!

Moot has two meanings - subject to debate or uncertainty and having no/little practical relevance.
I think the word original came from a term for a parliament / council.

When I was at University, there were moots which involved mock trials, but they were sometimes on very technical points so arguably fitted both descriptions (I recall one was about whether a person who was locked up, without there being any lawful excuse for his being impriosoned, but  who was asleep/unconscious the entire time so did not know he was imprisoned could be considered to have been falsely imprisoned)

I have seen it written as 'mute point' by a lawyer. In professional correspondence.  That really made me twitch. . .

Terry Wogan, on his breakfast radio show used to poke fun at those who use 'sat' rather than 'sitting' (or worse, sat sitting')

songbird

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #503 on: May 21, 2014, 09:43:51 AM »
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)

 ;D

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #504 on: May 21, 2014, 11:22:19 AM »
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)

entirely different subject...   where is this job site ?  ;)

whatsanenigma

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #505 on: May 21, 2014, 11:35:13 AM »
Given the tendency of construction workers to remove their shirts at the first blink of sunshine, they're just asking you to join in  ;)

entirely different subject...   where is this job site ?  ;)

Somewhere close to the Diet Coke factory, I think.

songbird

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #506 on: May 21, 2014, 12:22:07 PM »
I proofread a paper for a classmate last week...

The point was mute (apparently it couldn't speak for itself)

LOL

{snip}
Edit: OUCH- I meant to quote about the misuse of 'apart' and 'a part'.  My follow up post was going to be on moot, which I have read actually means a point to be talked about, rather the common (to me at least) usage of 'not worth talking about because something has already been decided, or is too trivial', so I don't want to use moot either - but I need to know a word that replaces what I thought moot meant...

Yeah, in law, we "moot" our arguments before going to appellate court.  In law school, we have "Mock Trial" (competitive teams that do pretend trials) and "Moot Court" (competitive teams that do pretend appeals, with brief and oral arguments). 

Now that I'm practicing, we'll get together to moot our colleagues before an important appellate argument. 

It definitely threw me for a loop at first, but I'm used to using it that way now!

Moot has two meanings - subject to debate or uncertainty and having no/little practical relevance.
I think the word original came from a term for a parliament / council.

When I was at University, there were moots which involved mock trials, but they were sometimes on very technical points so arguably fitted both descriptions (I recall one was about whether a person who was locked up, without there being any lawful excuse for his being impriosoned, but  who was asleep/unconscious the entire time so did not know he was imprisoned could be considered to have been falsely imprisoned)

I have seen it written as 'mute point' by a lawyer. In professional correspondence.  That really made me twitch. . .

Terry Wogan, on his breakfast radio show used to poke fun at those who use 'sat' rather than 'sitting' (or worse, sat sitting')

bansidhe

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    • The Menagerie
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #507 on: May 21, 2014, 04:25:10 PM »
I refuse to accept responsibility if anyone starts bleeding from the eyeballs when they see this:
http://news.distractify.com/people/the-30-most-unnecessary-uses-of-quotation-marks-in-history/?v=1

 >:D
Esan ozenki!

Arizona

lilfox

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #508 on: May 21, 2014, 06:25:00 PM »
There was a discussion a few pages back on the use of "more than" or "over" to indicate an amount in excess of a given figure.  This isn't my peeve.

I'll preface this by saying that I don't think this is technically incorrect.  But my peeve is when I read something like "She has more than 14 publications." (FWIW I've also seen it as "over X publications.")  Why not just write 15 pubs?  It only bugs me when it's a nonstandard number to use as a benchmark.  "More than 20 publications" is fine (if they want to be vague), because it could be 21, 22, 23, and so on.  Especially as you get into larger numbers it almost looks pedantic to list a specific number, for example 142 publications.  So, "more than 14" really just means 15, because if it were more than 15 (but less than 20), the usual choice would be to use 15 as the benchmark.  I would happily accept "14 publications and 3 currently in press" if that's what is really meant.

And if I never get another email that uses 's to indicate plurals, I will be so happy.  The note from my DD's school, thanking all the Mother's and Grandmother's who visited and received their gift's from the children, was sweet but painful to read.  (and yes, Mother and Grandmother were capitalized).

Danika

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #509 on: May 21, 2014, 10:37:27 PM »
And if I never get another email that uses 's to indicate plurals, I will be so happy.  The note from my DD's school, thanking all the Mother's and Grandmother's who visited and received their gift's from the children, was sweet but painful to read.  (and yes, Mother and Grandmother were capitalized).

Yes, that drives me nuts! Especially when it's from an elementary school teacher. I cringe and think "this is the person teaching my kids!"