Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 57422 times)

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Xandraea

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #675 on: July 29, 2014, 01:03:47 PM »
Yeah, I can't do "sweet" either. I went to a BBQ place here once and the only kind of tea they offered was "sweet". So, ok, I thought I'd try it. My teeth about fell out, it was so sweet. After about three sips I couldn't drink anymore.

I do put sweet n low in my tea, but you know, just a little bit.

Yep, I lived in the south for a couple years and I'd always have to specify "un-sweetened tea" to avoid the tea-flavoured corn syrup variety. Then I'd add my own sugar (real stuff only; my body doesn't recognize substitutes)

ladyknight1

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #676 on: July 29, 2014, 07:32:06 PM »
I always order unsweetened tea, with no lemon (since that is the default at most restaurants). I had to explain to someone at the wedding we attended this weekend that my son, who likes sweet tea, and tried the unlabeled tea in the carafe on the table then determined it was too sweet for him, than any sugar that looked at the tea will make it too sweet for my taste.

I hate 'whip cream' with a passion. We have several local restaurants with misspellings on their menus or menu boards. I always want to point it out.

Specky

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #677 on: July 29, 2014, 08:00:45 PM »
Used to work with a nurse who would use abbreviations.  One of her favorites was when she would try to describe something as watery.  She tried to use the formula for water, H2O and add a "y" on the end, so she thought she was writing "H2Oy".   Instead, what she was writing was "H2O2y".  I would see this notation and think, hmm...  Hydrogen peroxide, so foamy?

Thru, nite, sox, slax, nocs, tix, and pix are among my twitch triggers.  Also worked with a nurse who argued with me that "thru" was the correct spelling and "through" was incorrect.  She was also the one who would say, "I saul it"  "We had went" or "I had went".  She also called babies "it" when speaking to the baby's parents.  Guess she was a twitch trigger, too.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2014, 08:07:42 PM by Specky »

BeagleMommy

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #678 on: July 30, 2014, 09:07:44 AM »
This morning I was watching the Today show and they had a reporter covering the massive water main break in Los Angeles.  The reporter was talking about the flooding on the campus of UCLA; specifically, the sports venues.

He described how the UCLA officials now faced the task of "unwatering" the campus.  :o  How does one "unwater" something?

lowspark

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #679 on: July 30, 2014, 09:18:29 AM »
I've always been a stickler for spelling things correctly but I have come to realize that spelling and pronunciation do evolve (much to my horror!). I also know, again, even though it horrifies me, that many of the spellings we use today weren't correct in the past and thus, won't necessarily be correct in the future.

I think of this when I see words like "thru". At some point way in the future, it's conceivable that "thru" will evolve to be correct and even preferred.

Here's an interesting article about how some words evolved into their current spelling.
http://mentalfloss.com/article/13076/11-weirdly-spelled-words%E2%80%94and-how-they-got-way

Twik

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #680 on: July 30, 2014, 09:47:14 AM »
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo. With it went Time's strange liking for unusual word order. (As someone once commented, "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.")
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starry diadem

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #681 on: July 30, 2014, 01:37:20 PM »
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo. With it went Time's strange liking for unusual word order. (As someone once commented, "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.")

During Yoda's tenure as editor-in-chief, obviously.
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Danika

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #682 on: July 30, 2014, 10:04:20 PM »
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo. With it went Time's strange liking for unusual word order. (As someone once commented, "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.")

During Yoda's tenure as editor-in-chief, obviously.

LOL. Funny that is.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #683 on: July 31, 2014, 03:49:58 AM »
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo.

Fetched up from recesses of brain, an "American journalese" tale which I heard long ago.  Apparently, film-makers and -distributors had observed that films whose characters were unsophisticated back-country dwellers, tended not to be popular with audiences in remote rural parts of the US -- the inhabitants perhaps feeling that the films were mocking them, or...?  This phenomenon was magnificently "telegraphesed" (likely, by Time) as follows:  "Stix nix hix pix."

lowspark

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #684 on: July 31, 2014, 08:31:25 AM »
Some things are true changes, some are just fads. Back in the 1920s, Time Magazine was a chief proponent of "telegraphese," a style of writing where everything was clipped down to the bone. The text of articles was written in the same way that the headlines were. The magazine was quite proud of it. It was the wave of the future! Sleek, with nothing extra weighing it down, like articles or pronouns. Why write a full sentence saying the latest movie had made a lot of money, when you could say "New pic does boff biz!"

It went the way of the Dodo.

Fetched up from recesses of brain, an "American journalese" tale which I heard long ago.  Apparently, film-makers and -distributors had observed that films whose characters were unsophisticated back-country dwellers, tended not to be popular with audiences in remote rural parts of the US -- the inhabitants perhaps feeling that the films were mocking them, or...?  This phenomenon was magnificently "telegraphesed" (likely, by Time) as follows:  "Stix nix hix pix."

I don't know if that was a real headline or not, but it's quoted by Jimmy Cagney in his role as George M. Cohan in "Yankee Doodle Dandy". Toward the end of the film, he runs into some teenagers speaking the lingo of their time, presumably early 40s, and wants to give them a taste of his own familiar jargon. He reads them the headline of Variety which happens to be, "Stix nix hix pix" and then proceeds to explain to them what it means.

fountainof

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #685 on: July 31, 2014, 11:38:25 AM »
Quote
I'm kind of torn here.  I tend to think of "iced tea" as being correct because there is tea and it has been iced.  And "whipped cream" is correct because there is cream and it has been whipped.  But "ice cream" isn't cream that has been iced, so leaving off the "d" seems more okay to me.  I think of it more as ice that has been creamed (with milk, etc, added to it).  "Cream of ice", if you will.  But you could see it the other way around, I suppose.  :D
It is interesting as I would think ice that was creamed was more like a smoothie as ice cream doesn't have ice in it like the iced tea but is cooled over ice (at least traditionally) so maybe it should be iced cream.  In my area ice tea doesn't really mean tea with ice it refers to a drink flavour (that doesn't really even taste like tea like the US stuff does).  For some of these things I think they just become product names and aren't mean to be grammatically correct.  Like the drive-thru example that is only used commercially, almost like a brand name.

jmarvellous

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #686 on: July 31, 2014, 11:52:53 AM »
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")

Elfmama

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #687 on: July 31, 2014, 01:35:50 PM »
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")
I believe it has to do with the legalities of trademarking.  You can't trademark "Ready Quick" because they're common English words, but you can trademark the coined spelling "ReddiKwik". 
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #688 on: July 31, 2014, 01:36:47 PM »
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")

Companies spell "thru" that way for a reason - our brains process words in specific ways, and one of the side effects is it's incredibly hard for even non-dyslexic people to differentiate things like "though" versus "through" versus "thorough" on the first pass, especially if we're reading quickly.  "Thru" is much easier to read and understand at a momentary glance.

z_squared82

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #689 on: July 31, 2014, 01:40:56 PM »
My point was that I see people using "thru" in lots and lots of situations that have nothing to do with a "drive-thru" (though I would argue that it shouldn't be used there, either). Some people seem to use it anytime "through" would be the correct word.

I'm not sure why other oversimplified spelling is considered peeve-worthy but that one keeps getting excused as "commercial."

(Then again, I'm regularly annoyed by misspellings for the sake of some commercial purpose I can't divine, e.g., the proliferation of "Kwik" or "Rite.")

Companies spell "thru" that way for a reason - our brains process words in specific ways, and one of the side effects is it's incredibly hard for even non-dyslexic people to differentiate things like "though" versus "through" versus "thorough" on the first pass, especially if we're reading quickly.  "Thru" is much easier to read and understand at a momentary glance.

Additionally, it fits better on signs.