Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 61343 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5466
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #720 on: August 15, 2014, 07:43:34 PM »
I guess this is punctuation that makes me twitch.

A new antiques/vintage place opened in a nearby town. Its name is: (Woman's name)'s  Stor"e"

I'm not sure what they're aiming at with the random quote marks.

I think they're trying to go with "store - e" as in "story".  I'm not sure why, but that's with what I came up.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

ishka

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 89
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #721 on: August 16, 2014, 07:30:26 AM »
I know this isn't really spelling or grammar but - the use of nonplussed to mean unconcerned grinds my reading to a complete halt. Unconcerned is exactly not what nonplussed means. 

It has the same effect on me as the use of enervate to mean energise (J.K Rowling I'm glaring at you)

Mikayla

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4070
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #722 on: August 16, 2014, 07:31:12 PM »
The term "conscious" seems to have a meaning among college students that someone is....actually, I have no idea.  It's not a shortened version of conscientious, though.  It's like aware and caring or something.

Anyway, in randomly looking through our local craigslist at house-shares, I ran into an add for a young, chill person who "must be conscious".

As opposed to those annoying folks who are unconscious,  but still poring through craigslist ads .

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5466
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #723 on: August 17, 2014, 12:48:51 AM »
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Danika

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1946
  • I'm not speeding. I'm qualifying.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #724 on: August 17, 2014, 07:48:39 PM »
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1099
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #725 on: August 17, 2014, 10:18:12 PM »
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

Danika

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1946
  • I'm not speeding. I'm qualifying.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #726 on: August 18, 2014, 12:36:11 AM »
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

My DH's last name is an Irish name, but his family has been in the US for centuries. I blame his use of "myself" instead of "me" to watching too much Star Trek Next Generation because Captain Picard's lines were written that way all the time.

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5466
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #727 on: August 18, 2014, 01:37:52 AM »
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

My DH's last name is an Irish name, but his family has been in the US for centuries. I blame his use of "myself" instead of "me" to watching too much Star Trek Next Generation because Captain Picard's lines were written that way all the time.

My DH is German. I blame his on cop talk and a little of thinking it sounds better (like utilize instead of use).
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Danika

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1946
  • I'm not speeding. I'm qualifying.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #728 on: August 18, 2014, 01:41:17 AM »
DH cannot, it seams, use the word "me".  Instead, he uses "myself", a reflexive word.

I called out him on it once; he didn't know the difference.  Once I explained. he just didn't care.  I understand that he didn't care, but for Pete's sake, I explained and why you should care is now apparent!  Still didn't care...it continues you drive up the wall me, but I let it slide as part of our ever "evolving" language.

POD. My DH does the same thing.

Your spouses aren't Irish, I suppose?  I gather that one of the characteristic oddities of "Irish English" is a tendency to use "myself / himself / herself" for the personal pronouns -- both subject, and object: "Myself was walking along the road," etc.  Apparently a carrying-over of grammar / ways of expressing, from the Irish language, into English.

My DH's last name is an Irish name, but his family has been in the US for centuries. I blame his use of "myself" instead of "me" to watching too much Star Trek Next Generation because Captain Picard's lines were written that way all the time.

My DH is German. I blame his on cop talk and a little of thinking it sounds better (like utilize instead of use).

I, too, think my DH thinks he sounds more educated when he says that. He doesn't say it at home, but when he's in a business setting or if we're at a formal dinner party, he says it a lot more.

Another Sarah

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 334
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #729 on: August 18, 2014, 12:10:42 PM »
I have never seen this before, but now I've already seen it twice today on a forum Someone writing "ridic" instead of the full word "ridiculous." Oh boy, I hope this doesn't become a very popular new trend.

I hate to be the bearer if bad news but that's been fairly common for at least ten years now (I remember hearing it a lot in college). I guess consider yourself lucky you didn't have to hear it befor now if it bothers you?

"Ridic" is a quote from that classic piece of modern cinema, "Bring it on 2". (it came out around 2002 when I was at uni)

It's what the idiotic head cheerleader says, I think when people first started saying it, it was a bit tongue in cheek because she was the try-hard that wanted to be a trendsetter, but now I think it's lost some of the comic overtones.

ladyknight1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7759
  • Operating the logic hammer since 1987.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #730 on: August 18, 2014, 12:20:40 PM »
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Eeep!

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 869
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #731 on: August 18, 2014, 01:15:38 PM »
The term "conscious" seems to have a meaning among college students that someone is....actually, I have no idea.  It's not a shortened version of conscientious, though.  It's like aware and caring or something.

Anyway, in randomly looking through our local craigslist at house-shares, I ran into an add for a young, chill person who "must be conscious".

As opposed to those annoying folks who are unconscious,  but still poring through craigslist ads .

I'm betting they are using it kind of like "socially conscious" or "environmentally conscious".  Although, the thought of running an ad for someone with "not passed out" as a qualification cracks me up.
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." - Dr. Seuss

Margo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1617
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #732 on: August 19, 2014, 09:19:21 AM »
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5466
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #733 on: August 19, 2014, 10:23:57 AM »
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )

I think you would be hard pressed to find someone of driving age who does my know the meaning of "vehicle". I get the other frustrations, though.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Mel the Redcap

  • Scheming Foreign Hussy!
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 970
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #734 on: August 19, 2014, 06:00:33 PM »
Awkward wording: "The University would like to inform you about a new process that we must follow beginning with the Fall 2014 semester regarding confirming academic activity. "

Grrr.

When I was doing my post grad course we had a couple of classes which were about effective communication, and using plain English. We were given various pieces of writing to 'translate'.

I found it really surprising to see how many people seemed to struggle to put things into clear, understandable english.

Our tutor admitted (when bribed with beer asked nicely) that all of the examples were taken from actual letters, leaflets and notices issued by the University.

(One which bugs me is the warning which used to be displayed on local rubbish vans 0 in the old days, this used to read "Caution! - Men at Work"
Presumaby this was thought to be sexist, so instead of changing it to "Caution! People at Work" they decided to go with "Caution - Operatives working at rear of vehicle" Which bugged me for a number of reasons:
- It was displayed on the back of the vehicle. The workers would be working mainly but not entirely at the back, so if you could see the sign, you could also see the people working.
- because it is a longer statement, they had to make the lettering smaller, so it was harder to read and so less effective
- it assumes that everyone is familiar with the words 'operative' and 'vehicle'

I have recently moved house into a new area. Our local bin lorries don;t appear to have any warnings at all, perhaps relying on the fact that they are covered in flashing orange lights, and that all of the workers wear Hi-Viz jackets. The recycling lorries have big signs which just say "Caution!" and leave it up to the individual driver to work out what they need to be cautious about.. )

I think you would be hard pressed to find someone of driving age who does my know the meaning of "vehicle". I get the other frustrations, though.

People with reading disabilities? People with English as a second (third, fourth...) language? People who don't use formal/complex English very much, who haven't used the word 'vehicle' since they left school, and maybe not even then? Heck, I have trouble saying 'vehicle' without pronouncing it in a sarcastic/humorous way, because it just doesn't come up in normal life and my first association with it is Sheriff Roscoe P. Coltrane in the Dukes of Hazzard telling the main characters to exit their 'veee-hickle', for some reason. ;D
"Set aphasia to stun!"