Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 62998 times)

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Tini

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #45 on: September 17, 2013, 08:23:38 AM »
'He gave it to my husband and I' instead of 'my husband and me'

That one feels like people over-correcting the old grammar maven's favourite 'you and me are going to the cinema' where the 'me' as the subject should really be 'I'. Doesn't meant that all 'and mes' have to be replaced by 'and Is'.
I mean, you would never say 'he gave it to I', would you.

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Queen of Clubs

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #46 on: September 17, 2013, 08:56:41 AM »
And when someone attempts to turn "my husband and I" into a possessive by adding "apostrophe s", so it becomes "my husband and I's".  No.  Please.

For where and there, I wonder if it'd help people if they remember that "where" and "there" both contain "here".

One that I was caught out by was "just deserts".  I thought it should have been "desserts" but it's actually a very old form of "to deserve".

o_gal

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #47 on: September 17, 2013, 09:12:17 AM »
I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.

Haha, me too!

"I before E, except after C, and only when the sound is 'ee'." Too many people were not taught the bolded part of that rhyme!

One of my favorite t-shirts that Computergear.com has had for sale is:

"I before E, except after C"
           Weird, huh?

MrTango

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #48 on: September 17, 2013, 09:14:42 AM »
There are two big ones that really grind my gears:

Misuse of apostrophes: If one isn't 100% certain that an apostrophe belongs there, leave it out.  It's far less jarring to have to mentally add it than to see it there when it doesn't belong.

Homophone misuse: Using "there" when one means "their" or "they're," or "you're" when they mean "your."  There are myriad other examples.

Twik

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #49 on: September 17, 2013, 09:24:08 AM »
"I could care less."

Chalkboard!  Fingernails!  Screeeeccchhhhh!

I think this makes a certain amount of sense, if you consider it a shortening of the phrase "as if I could care less".

The one that's chalkboard to me, perhaps because it's close enough to correct to be jarring, is "free reign". No, the term is "free rein," as in what you give a horse when you allow him to move at will, without restricting him by use of the reins. When you give someone free rein, you give him/her liberty; you don't pass over the power of kingly control, or reign.
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Thipu1

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #50 on: September 17, 2013, 09:47:10 AM »
As used in NYC, 'I could care less' can make perfect sense if the proper body language is used. 

The shoulders are raised.  The elbows are against the body and the hands are extended palms up. 

The words are said with a rising tone at the end. 

Try it and you'll see what I mean. 


BabyMama

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #51 on: September 17, 2013, 10:01:26 AM »
100s. Sneak peak. Per say.
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BabyMama

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #52 on: September 17, 2013, 10:04:11 AM »
Yeah, apostrophe abuse gets to me big-time. Also, it annoys me when people confuse "faze" and "phase" (as in, "He noticed the cat was on fire, but it didn't phase him, he just dumped the champagne bottle on her and went on talking to the Prime Minister". It's faze).

My paper (which is a major paper, not a local rag) got the phase/faze thing wrong in a story today. Obviously, too many editors have been laid off!

My local paper decided replacing the "G" in "Grapefruit" with a slice of grapefruit was a good idea.

http://weknowmemes.com/2013/03/rapefruit/
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123sandy

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #53 on: September 17, 2013, 10:08:56 AM »
I could care less annoys me.

Any mention of nom, noms or nomming makes my hand itch to slap.


amylouky

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #54 on: September 17, 2013, 10:23:37 AM »
It's instead of its.

I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the makers of this mistake. Very largely, the possessive in English is formed by " 's" on the end of a noun (cicero's pen; the cat's whiskers); but the possessive of "it" is not "it's", but "its"; though there is a word "its" -- the contraction of "it is".  English can be a confusing, crazy and crazy-making language, full of pitfalls -- even for native English-speakers !

Okay, sorry.. I haven't had my coffee yet. The contraction of "it is" is "its"?
Dear me, have I been making people twitchy all these years?

Shoo

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #55 on: September 17, 2013, 10:26:00 AM »
It's instead of its.

I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the makers of this mistake. Very largely, the possessive in English is formed by " 's" on the end of a noun (cicero's pen; the cat's whiskers); but the possessive of "it" is not "it's", but "its"; though there is a word "its" -- the contraction of "it is".  English can be a confusing, crazy and crazy-making language, full of pitfalls -- even for native English-speakers !

Okay, sorry.. I haven't had my coffee yet. The contraction of "it is" is "its"?
Dear me, have I been making people twitchy all these years?

No, the contraction for "it is" is it's.  I think the poster just forgot the apostrophe.

mharbourgirl

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #56 on: September 17, 2013, 10:49:24 AM »
All of the above, yes.  And this one that's been bugging the ever-lovin' crap out of me lately:

brakes vs. breaks

The glass breaks when you drop it on the floor.

Vehicles and other sorts of moving things have brakes - cars have brakes, bikes/trains/planes/machines have brakes.

There is no reasonable excuse for mixing the two up.  In my opinion, of course.

jaxsue

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #57 on: September 17, 2013, 11:01:44 AM »
ITA with every example given so far.

Some of mine: I have to say that "nom," in any form, makes me homicidal.
Sale vs. sell. You don't "sale" a house, you sell a house.
Putting $ after the number. Saying "ten dollars" does not mean you write 10$.
Payed instead of paid. You can say you payed out a rope, but you paid, not payed, a bill.

Twik

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #58 on: September 17, 2013, 11:09:09 AM »
Another one I've been seeing recently, that makes me fear for the educational system, since it should have been learned in grade school: "payed" as the past tense of "to pay".

I know it's an anomaly that we write it "paid," but English is full of anomalies. I'm not sure if the spread of "payed" is due to lack of education, or represents the brain's automatic grammar function doing an override of what the writer knows is the correct spelling. "No! We pluralize by putting an 'ed' after the verb. Blast you, hand, for trying this 'paid' nonsense!"
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

cwm

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Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #59 on: September 17, 2013, 11:11:42 AM »
Person 1:  Hi.  How are you?

Person 2:  Fine.  Yourself?

GAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'm sorry Shoo, and I am a bad little grammar and spelling twitcher I suppose but... what exactly is wrong with that?

It should be "you" instead of "yourself," because you wouldn't say "How are yourself?"

See, I do this sometimes. But for me it's shortened for "I'm fine, and how are you doing yourself?"

I flinch at the one I see here: Diety. No. Deity. From deus.

Diety means 'like a diet' and I vote against it being a real word.

Haha, me too!

"I before E, except after C, and only when the sound is 'ee'." Too many people were not taught the bolded part of that rhyme!

One of my favorite t-shirts that Computergear.com has had for sale is:

"I before E, except after C"
           Weird, huh?

"I before E, except after C, or when sounding like A as in neighbor or weigh. Unless it's weird."  That's how I learned it.

I detest misuse of homophones. I also absolutely hate it when someone uses the word "whenever" at any time they mean to use the word "when" instead.

"So I was going Joe's house whenever the car accident hapened." Really? That's the only time you went to Joe's? I thought he was your boyfriend and you went over there a lot more often.