Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 63300 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

EmmaJ.

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1417
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #135 on: September 18, 2013, 09:26:57 AM »
<snip>
In Korean they don't have articles (a/an/the), so my Korean co-worker tends to simply leave them out. This drives me crazy when I proofread his stuff, because there are SO MANY of them. I told him to at least try to put them in, he ought to get some right just by chance if nothing else, and then I wouldn't have to mark them all.

Thanks!  You just explained why my teammate says "what heck" instead of "what the heck".  :D

lilfox

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #136 on: September 18, 2013, 09:41:10 AM »
The item is composed of X, Y, and Z.
The item comprises X, Y, and Z.

It is not "comprised of" anything.  I suppose that comprise is the rarer word, so its use seems to sound more educated, but adding "of" takes all that away.

Mostly what bugs me now is that autocorrect just changed its above to it's, so I had to manually correct it.

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6859
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #137 on: September 18, 2013, 09:52:47 AM »
When people who should know better misinterpret an innocent remark.

I remember attending a lecture about an ancient text.  The speaker referred to a certain turn of phrase as a 'literary conceit'.  Immediately, a high school teacher in attendance jumped up and snarled, 'How dare you call (the author) conceited!?'

A teacher of high school English should know what a literary conceit is. 

Corvid

  • Etiquette Hell Thread Assassin Squad
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 883
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #138 on: September 18, 2013, 09:56:04 AM »
I try to be tolerant of grammar and spelling errors, especially as I'm sure I unwittingly make numerous errors of my own. 

I understand that people are often writing in their own English dialect, so I cut nonstandard English like "I seen" some slack.  Spelling is more of an issue for me, but I also understand that someone can be familiar with a spoken word or phrase but not have read it anywhere, for example, "per say".

That said, there are some errors that never fail to make me wince a bit.  A few have been mentioned - phase for faze, loose for lose.  Especially loose for lose.  Oh, I hate that one so much.  Come on, people.  They don't even sound the same.  "Loos".  "Looz".  Please stop it.  You aren't trying to loose weight.  Or if you are, quit that and tighten it again.

One I haven't seen mentioned yet is "deep seeded".  It is "deep-seated".  No, I am not kidding and yes, I am correct.

Ah, what is as refreshing as pedantry with one's morning coffee?

daen

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 824
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #139 on: September 18, 2013, 10:00:33 AM »
I processed a form a while ago that required disclosure of past driving record. One of the self-reported incidents was "I backed into a parked car wow clearing snow in the parking lot."

I knew the person in question, and I was aware that his pronunciation of "while" was remarkably close to "wow." I wasn't aware that his spelling reflected that pronunciation so closely. (It was handwritten, so no autocorrect or typo to blame.)


Lynn2000

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5378
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #140 on: September 18, 2013, 10:11:49 AM »
<snip>
In Korean they don't have articles (a/an/the), so my Korean co-worker tends to simply leave them out. This drives me crazy when I proofread his stuff, because there are SO MANY of them. I told him to at least try to put them in, he ought to get some right just by chance if nothing else, and then I wouldn't have to mark them all.

Thanks!  You just explained why my teammate says "what heck" instead of "what the heck".  :D

LOL! I was just trying to think if my co-worker said things like that, and I realized I wasn't sure, because to me the lack of articles is MUCH more noticeable in writing than in speaking. Same with verb conjugations and other errors.

Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.
~Lynn2000

Xandraea

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 410
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #141 on: September 18, 2013, 12:00:18 PM »
All of the above!
I see a lot of mixing up of they're/their/there, your/you're, where/wear/ware, bear/bare, are/our, who's/whose in written chat in WoW.  It makes me cringe, and pity those who seem to have forgotten school for video games.

Also these drive me nuts: expresso, exspecially, Ima (I'm going to), axe (ask), learned (taught), borrow (lend), and abbreviating 3-letter words to one letter, as in "U R"

Ms_Cellany

  • The Queen of Squee
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5870
  • Big white goggie? No. Hasn't seen him.
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #142 on: September 18, 2013, 12:46:56 PM »

Fuschia is another one I see misspelled a lot that makes me facepalm. "Fushia" - no. "Fuchia" - no, and that sounds vaguely obscene. "Fucshia" - that's even more vaguely obscene! "Foosha" - ...no. Just no. :P
psst...it's "fuchsia"



And that's what I get for being half-asleep and not proofreading. :-[ *slinks off to the corner of mild shame*
I remember that one by remembering it's named after Herr Fuchs. (true story.)

It also works for Mr. Poinsett's plant.
Using a chainsaw is as close as we come to having a lightsaber in this life.

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1116
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #143 on: September 18, 2013, 01:01:45 PM »
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

Miss Misery

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1900
  • Humanity is overrated.
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #144 on: September 18, 2013, 01:30:49 PM »
Whenever I see "Your Welcome", a little part of me shrivels up and dies.

*or*

seaing writting lyk this that iz on long sentance with no puncuati0n at all everthing is sm@shed togeter and spelchk dosent exst how do u read this i dont now wear it beginz or endz i meen dont they teech this st#ff in skool anymor iz speling reelly that hard geez

*or*

Writing like this.No spaces between periods or commas.At all. Nothing,zero,zip,nada.It drives me bonkers.Like,really bonkers.

Ms_Cellany

  • The Queen of Squee
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5870
  • Big white goggie? No. Hasn't seen him.
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #145 on: September 18, 2013, 01:32:29 PM »
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

ASL is sort of the same way. I love watching Stephen Torrence (aka CaptainValor) do ASL versions of songs (mostly geek songs, but he also does some pop music). If you use the captions, it provides the gloss - the literal transcription of the ASL.

So in Jonathan Coulton's "Re: Your Brains" you can see that "We're not unreasonable/ I mean, no one's gonna eat your eyes" comes out as "We not crazy/ Not eyes eat."

a) It's funny.
b) It's like the most distilled form of language there is. No verb conjugations, no noun declensions.

Edited because "pop" music is not always "popo" music.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2013, 02:21:09 PM by Ms_Cellany »
Using a chainsaw is as close as we come to having a lightsaber in this life.

NestHolder

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1141
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #146 on: September 18, 2013, 01:33:53 PM »
I would like to state, firmly, that nobody EVER HOLDS TH—excuse me.  Nobody 'holds the reigns'.  I exclaim in joy whenever I see someone has actually typed 'reins'.  It is so rare these days.

Lynn2000

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5378
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #147 on: September 18, 2013, 01:56:40 PM »
Korean also does not have gendered pronouns (he/she). This doesn't come up in the writing much, but when my co-worker is speaking he often says the wrong one (he or she) and then corrects himself; that, I notice, I think because I rely on the pronouns more to help me understand the story he's telling.

I have a friend (British, of the English variety) whose wife of thirty years is Indian, from Gujarat.  She's a very sweet lady; but, it would seem, not a natural linguist; after decades of living in the UK and speaking English most of the time, her English can still be a bit "wobbly"; including, having problems with he / she. (One takes it that Gujarati, like Korean, does not have gendered pronouns.)

One is prompted to wonder: do Asian languages, which seem as regards word-use (pronunciation, a different thing) usually to go the "simple" route, maybe have the best idea?  Why tie oneself in linguistic knots about gender stuff, when such things can be worked out from the context?  That applies to relatively-simple English; let alone to such tongues as the Romance languages, and German and Russian, which -- it would seem -- gratuitously choose to make life difficult by assigning different genders to inanimate objects.

Well, not to get too far off on the linguistic tangent, but IMO most languages that develop organically over centuries/millennia reach about the same level of complexity overall, if not in one area then another. So maybe Korean doesn't have gendered pronouns, but I believe they do have a rather complicated (to me) system of address based on hierarchy and relationship, with different words and constructions used depending on if they're talking to someone older or younger, supervisory or supervised, etc.. Personally I think that would be very difficult to get correct as a non-native speaker--a mistake could be seen as rude, not just poor communication.

When I studied French in high school I had such trouble with the gendered objects. You really just have to memorize them as they often make no logical sense. I find that when a language lacks an entire concept, it's a lot more difficult to teach it to someone than if it's just a matter of different vocabulary words, or simple rules about whether the adjective goes before or after the noun. Personally I find languages and language change fascinating, and understanding how mistakes come about helps me to explain the correct way to someone. I think "should of" instead of "should have" is really interesting, for example--it appears to be related to people hearing the contraction (should've) far more often than they see or write it. Because really, it does sound like "should of," at least in my part of the world.
~Lynn2000

menley

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 627
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #148 on: September 18, 2013, 02:19:24 PM »
Hungarian doesn't have a separate word for he and she, so many of my Hungarian friends seem to have trouble remembering which is which when speaking English. I can't tell you how many times someone has said "she" about my husband :) I remind myself that I butcher their language in far more severe ways on a daily basis though, so I can't get too annoyed by it!

pandabear

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 82
Re: Grammer and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #149 on: September 18, 2013, 02:23:20 PM »

 I haven't read the entire thread yet, but one of my biggest pet peeves is using cause or cos instead of because.  It's not that difficult a word to spell!

 mixing up advice and advise is another.  And the last... misspelling ridiculous.  There is no e.