Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 67401 times)

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o_gal

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #225 on: September 24, 2013, 08:06:23 AM »
I haven't seen this one mentioned yet. E-hellions, do you own a bedroom suite or a bedroom suit? Likewise, do you have a suite of furniture in your living room, or just a plain ol' suit of furniture.

Drove me nuts when I moved to this area (west-central Ohio) and kept hearing all of the commercials from furniture stores advertising bedroom "suits". And living room suits. Not the correct pronunciation, which is like "sweet". I keep wanting to go to the stores and ask them why I need to have a special set of clothes (a suit) made for my bedroom.

cwm

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #226 on: September 24, 2013, 12:27:04 PM »
I haven't seen this one mentioned yet. E-hellions, do you own a bedroom suite or a bedroom suit? Likewise, do you have a suite of furniture in your living room, or just a plain ol' suit of furniture.

Drove me nuts when I moved to this area (west-central Ohio) and kept hearing all of the commercials from furniture stores advertising bedroom "suits". And living room suits. Not the correct pronunciation, which is like "sweet". I keep wanting to go to the stores and ask them why I need to have a special set of clothes (a suit) made for my bedroom.

Well, I am quite a fan of haberdashery and millinery, so perhaps a custom suit for each room of the house wouldn't be a bad idea after all.

Then again, changing clothes so often would just be annoying.

Xandraea

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #227 on: September 24, 2013, 01:01:59 PM »
I haven't seen this one mentioned yet. E-hellions, do you own a bedroom suite or a bedroom suit? Likewise, do you have a suite of furniture in your living room, or just a plain ol' suit of furniture.

Drove me nuts when I moved to this area (west-central Ohio) and kept hearing all of the commercials from furniture stores advertising bedroom "suits". And living room suits. Not the correct pronunciation, which is like "sweet". I keep wanting to go to the stores and ask them why I need to have a special set of clothes (a suit) made for my bedroom.

One wears a suit, and lives in/with a suite.

From Dictionary.com:

suit [soot]
noun
1.
a set of clothing, armor, or the like, intended for wear together.
2.
a set of men's garments of the same color and fabric, consisting of trousers, a jacket, and sometimes a vest.
3.
a similarly matched set consisting of a skirt and jacket, and sometimes a topcoat or blouse, worn by women.
4.
any costume worn for some special activity: a running suit.
5.
Slang. a business executive.



suite  [sweet or for 3 often , soot]
noun
1.
a number of things forming a series or set.
2.
a connected series of rooms to be used together: a hotel suite.
3.
a set of furniture, especially a set comprising the basic furniture necessary for one room: a bedroom suite.
4.
a company of followers or attendants; a train or retinue.
5.
Music.
a.
an ordered series of instrumental dances, in the same or related keys, commonly preceded by a prelude.
b.
an ordered series of instrumental movements of any character.



I learned something new today.  I knew the spelling part, and always figured people were mispronouncing "suite" as "suit", which I only really heard when I lived near south OH/KY/WV.  Apparently it is a recognized pronunciation of "suite" when referring to a set of furniture. I'd still pronounce it "sweet".

artk2002

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #228 on: September 24, 2013, 01:18:28 PM »
This is a tad off-topic, but I figured the people who enjoy English here would get a groan out of this.

School director introducing one of the deans last night: "Bob has his thumb on the heartbeat of this campus." As I texted to my ex (who works for this school) "The English language wept."
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

amylouky

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #229 on: September 24, 2013, 01:39:05 PM »
Oh yes. How bad was that? And I'm doing a degree in English. You knew what I meant though! Thank you.

You may want to google "versus", also..    ;)

Sorry, in any other thread I wouldn't point that out, just felt like I had to here.

KB

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #230 on: September 24, 2013, 06:45:53 PM »
Basically if we all stopped being so damned modest, we'd get it right every time.

I and Jamie went to the party.

Fred invited me and Jamie.

See? We should all be more conceited.

And people would call you out on your grammar since you should NEVER put yourself first!  :o

See, you can't win!  ;)

Dazi

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #231 on: September 26, 2013, 11:12:35 AM »
Threw or thru for through...I begrudgingly give a pass  for drive thru.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





cwm

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #232 on: September 26, 2013, 11:21:56 AM »
Threw or thru for through...I begrudgingly give a pass  for drive thru.

Yes. I will also give a pass to EZ Bake Oven or the EZ Pass lanes for the turnpike, this is what they decided to name those things.

I mean, it's not that hard to write it out. It's literally easy!

I did see a funny last night I had to share, though. And I figured this was a decent board to do it, seeing as how we're discussing language and pronunciation.

How can you tell the difference between a plumber and a chemist? Ask him to pronounce "unionized".

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #233 on: September 26, 2013, 11:37:21 AM »
How can you tell the difference between a plumber and a chemist? Ask him to pronounce "unionized".

LOL.  I'm both a (bio)chemist and in a union so I'm really confused.   ;D

A poster here has the tag line 'Bad spellers of the world, untie!'  Makes me laugh but also highlights one of my twitches.  Words with transposed letters, especially when the transposed letters also form a word.  Quite for quiet is one I see a lot.

I've been reading a lot of free books on my Kindle and one of the things that is more noticeable is mistakes in they're, their, there; to, too, two; maid, made; that kind of thing.  Drives me crazy, even though I find my menopause brain is making me do the same thing.  Although, I usually realize right away that I've typed the wrong word and I correct it.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #234 on: September 26, 2013, 11:43:43 AM »
I've made a spelling mistake in something I've posted to Facebook - and I can't edit it. It hurts every time I see it.

z_squared82

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #235 on: September 26, 2013, 11:52:55 AM »
I haven’t seen my pet peeves yet. Other than using an apostrophe to make something plural, which is just wrong.

I can handle using prepositions at the end of sentences, especially when spoken, except for “at”. “Where is he at?” No, no, no, no! “Where is he?” and “Where is he at?” mean the exact same thing! (Unlike “Who is this?” and “Who is this for?”) Just drop the “at” and sound more educated!

Also, over/more than. Over is spatial. More than is quantitative. I jumped over the tire more than 50 times. “Over 100 items on sale!” is never right.

Oh, and funny mistake I saw on my first day as a newspaper intern? Meringue vs. Merengue. They meant the dance, they said the pie.

cwm

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #236 on: September 26, 2013, 12:26:22 PM »
I haven’t seen my pet peeves yet. Other than using an apostrophe to make something plural, which is just wrong.

I can handle using prepositions at the end of sentences, especially when spoken, except for “at”. “Where is he at?” No, no, no, no! “Where is he?” and “Where is he at?” mean the exact same thing! (Unlike “Who is this?” and “Who is this for?”) Just drop the “at” and sound more educated!

Also, over/more than. Over is spatial. More than is quantitative. I jumped over the tire more than 50 times. “Over 100 items on sale!” is never right.

Oh, and funny mistake I saw on my first day as a newspaper intern? Meringue vs. Merengue. They meant the dance, they said the pie.

Unless the sale is in the basement, maybe?

"Where he be?" is one thing that I just can't stand. I could almost understand the "Where he at?" thing, but "Where he be?" No. You're conjugating the verb wrong. He doesn't be anything. He is somewhere. I mean, even "Where he is?" sounds a bit better. Subject/verb agreement. We're moving forward here.

Ms_Cellany

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #237 on: September 26, 2013, 12:54:54 PM »


"Where he be?" is one thing that I just can't stand. I could almost understand the "Where he at?" thing, but "Where he be?" No. You're conjugating the verb wrong. He doesn't be anything. He is somewhere. I mean, even "Where he is?" sounds a bit better. Subject/verb agreement. We're moving forward here.

I have no problem with "be" as colloquial/dialect. In Laura Ingalls Wilder's Farmer Boy, the story of her husband's childhood, I remember a scene where Almanzo is watching his father cut roof shingles. His father notices him and asks "Be ye havin' a good time, son?"
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TootsNYC

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #238 on: September 26, 2013, 01:41:42 PM »
I've made a spelling mistake in something I've posted to Facebook - and I can't edit it. It hurts every time I see it.

I delete those and repost. Unless someone has commented.

amylouky

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #239 on: September 26, 2013, 01:46:12 PM »
So, apparently there was a meteor or something that buzzed over our city this morning. The local news station posted on Facebook, asking who had noticed it.
It's a sad commentary on my city that a good 40 percent of the comments included the words, "I seen.."