Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 61450 times)

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Hillia

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #300 on: October 13, 2013, 10:58:47 AM »
I'll admit I spell it "sherbet" and say "sherbert" - just one of those words whose pronunciation bears little resemblance to the spelling, like worcestershire sauce.  (I say "wuss-ter-shir" and DH says "wore-chester," for the record . . .)

English place-names, pronunciation versus spelling -- I'd give anyone who is not English, a total pass re all of that: inconsistent lunacy, rules. Slarti, in fact you've got the pronunciation of "Worcestershire" right, as near as makes no difference.  And with place-names in our Celtic neighbour countries, the nightmare becomes worse: their, different, ancestral languages get in on the act too...

Martha Grimes writes murder mysteries that feature a recurring cast of eccentrics.  One is a social climbing American woman, who thinks her behavior is that of (her concept of) the British aristocracy.  However, she cannot grasp British names.  One character is named Ruthven, which should be pronounced 'Rivven'.  Another is St. John, pronounced 'Sinjin'.  She argues furiously for phonetic pronunciation.

Another  mixup that gets me: Carmel for caramel.  Carmel is a place name, caramel is a delicious candy, sometimes melted and poured of popcorn.

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White Dragon

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #301 on: October 13, 2013, 01:52:42 PM »
A large part of my job involves the care and feeding of Purchase Orders.

These documents go by the short form PO.

The correct use of the term would be me composing an email which says "I am forwarding you the POs we discussed earlier."

However, my computer auto corrects POs to Pos.
I do not handle 'pos', I handle POs.

So unless I want to go back and correct every use of the term, the only way to type it without backtracking is to insert a completely incorrect and aggravating possessive apostrophe. The fact that my computer will not let me write the word properly is like nails on an chalkboard - and it happens several dozen times a day.

My colleagues wonder why I growl at my computer? It's because I've forced to write 'PO's' for the 30th time that day. >:(

Are you using Word? If so, go to autocorrect options and unclick the box that says something like "Correct two INitial CAps". Isn't there also a way to add exceptions? (Sorry to be imprecise; I'm not on a machine with Word right now.)

You're quite right and your solution is perfect.
Sadly, my system locks me out of making changes.
It's enough to make me weep!

I will be soooooo happy when they send back this bug ridden system and get me a new one!
Oh to be able to open files on the first try!!!!

They tell me the new machines are in but just have to be configured. I am on tenter-hooks!!
« Last Edit: October 13, 2013, 04:35:40 PM by White Dragon »

Sebastienne

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #302 on: October 13, 2013, 03:58:07 PM »
The other thing you can do in Word is to set up your own autocorrect/autocomplete so that "pos" automatically changes to "POs." How to do that depends on which version of Word you're using, but it's usually under Tools somewhere.

TylerBelle

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #303 on: October 13, 2013, 06:33:29 PM »
"Prolly." ::twitch:: I think it's used to shorten "probably." Why? To me it sounds more what a little girl would name her doll.


One of our work study students was just tasked with making an inventory of our supply closet.  On the list she wrote that we had:

Vanilla folders (150)

My head hurts.

Hee! This rings a bell. I remember in elementary school we would use manila paper for various projects and things, and for the longest time I thought the teachers were saying vanilla (it was similar in color to the ice cream) ::).
Always be on the lookout for wonder. --E.B. White

White Dragon

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #304 on: October 15, 2013, 11:47:42 PM »
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

violinp

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #305 on: October 16, 2013, 12:11:49 AM »
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

I...didn't know it was a word, and I consider myself fairly literate as well. Someone can just not know a word. However, if I were a teacher and grading a paper, I'd check a dictionary to make sure I was grading fairly.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


MariaE

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #306 on: October 16, 2013, 06:33:15 AM »
DD is in first year of university and taking a first year English course.

Recently, she got back an essay where she was discussing the character's compulsion to do something.

She used the word "geas" and the essay came back with the word underlined.
Her English teacher did not know that it was a word.

DD was in shock.
I was in shock. Neither of us considered it really obscure word, especially since this is a literature class and the professor is presumably well read.

I...didn't know it was a word, and I consider myself fairly literate as well. Someone can just not know a word. However, if I were a teacher and grading a paper, I'd check a dictionary to make sure I was grading fairly.

I'd never heard the word before either.
 
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iridaceae

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #307 on: October 16, 2013, 06:39:04 AM »
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.

Psychopoesie

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #308 on: October 16, 2013, 06:43:46 AM »
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.

Agree, it depends on what you've read.  It's familiar to me as a reader of fantasty novels, also cropping up in some folk or fairy tales if I recall correctly.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #309 on: October 16, 2013, 06:45:51 AM »
Before seeing these recent posts, I'd only known "geas" as a word from Celtic culture, which I'd understood as equivalent to a taboo (came across it, with that sense implied, in S.M. Stirling's "Emberverse" novel series, before I got fed up with said series -- the novels take place, partially in a strongly Celtic milieu).  Was unaware that it could also be a compulsion to do something.  Looking up the online Oxford Dictionary, I found: "geas -- in Irish folklore -- an obligation or prohibition magically imposed on a person".

Highly educational, this eHell !

MariaE

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #310 on: October 16, 2013, 06:49:35 AM »
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.

Agree, it depends on what you've read.  It's familiar to me as a reader of fantasty novels, also cropping up in some folk or fairy tales if I recall correctly.

Fantasy is probably the genre I read the most, still haven't ever come across it before. Have never read any of the Witch World novels though.
 
Dane by birth, Kiwi by choice

Psychopoesie

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #311 on: October 16, 2013, 07:31:34 AM »
Geas is common in fantasy; I know I've run across it in some of the Witch World novels.

Agree, it depends on what you've read.  It's familiar to me as a reader of fantasty novels, also cropping up in some folk or fairy tales if I recall correctly.

Fantasy is probably the genre I read the most, still haven't ever come across it before. Have never read any of the Witch World novels though.

There's so much wonderful fantasy to read, impossible to get to it all.  :)

Hard to work out where I first ran across the word - it has the feeling of a word I learned in my teens. That's about when I did read the Witch World novels - so maybe that's the source for me.

There was also a series by Tom Deitz (Windmaster's Bane is the first) which is where I do recall it being used - it draws on Irish folklore which may be why.

iridaceae

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #312 on: October 16, 2013, 07:49:44 AM »
Patricia Kennealy-Morrison used it in her Keltiad books as well.

squeakers

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #313 on: October 16, 2013, 08:30:43 AM »
Piers Anthony uses geas a lot.  In both his Xanth series and his Phaze/Apprentice Adept series.
"I feel sarcasm is the lowest form of wit." "It is so low, in fact, that Miss Manners feels sure you would not want to resort to it yourself, even in your own defense. We do not believe in retaliatory rudeness." Judith Martin

Psychopoesie

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #314 on: October 16, 2013, 08:42:56 AM »
Patricia Kennealy-Morrison used it in her Keltiad books as well.
Piers Anthony uses geas a lot.  In both his Xanth series and his Phaze/Apprentice Adept series.

Read these too. Still think I read it first in the Witch World ones.

Also pretty sure I came across geas in a version of the Hound of Cuchulainn when I was still in late primary school. Was used in the sense of being a taboo - there was something he couldn't eat (dog, maybe, because that's what he was named after).

I love that this thread is reminding me of many good reads from the past.

Thanks.  :)