Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 61158 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

amylouky

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1567
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #345 on: November 23, 2013, 02:25:06 PM »
I'm holding an introductory English grammar class over the holiday period on top of my regular classes. The guy who made the sign typed, "Learn to use English Grammer Correct! Enrole now!"

 :o

What's worse is that when I brought up the glaringly obvious, he didn't think it was that important. Talk about bad advertising! Yeesh...

Nooooo!  PLEASE tell me you're joking.  :o ::)

Actually, please tell me HE was joking?

Pen^2

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1107
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #346 on: November 23, 2013, 02:52:49 PM »
I'm holding an introductory English grammar class over the holiday period on top of my regular classes. The guy who made the sign typed, "Learn to use English Grammer Correct! Enrole now!"

 :o

What's worse is that when I brought up the glaringly obvious, he didn't think it was that important. Talk about bad advertising! Yeesh...

Nooooo!  PLEASE tell me you're joking.  :o ::)

Actually, please tell me HE was joking?

Unfortunately, he wasn't. English-based creole is the standard tongue here (I'm not exaggerating), and as such, the importance of things like tenses, pronouncing the final consonants in words (I'm not talking 'comb' but rather words like 'cat' here), word order, plurals, etc. is very low indeed. "Can I turn off the light?" is said as, "Off light can?" and pronounced as, "Off ligh cah?" and "He went to the park yesterday," becomes, "Yestuhdeh go puh one."

The advertising guy's point of view was that everyone else would understand it more easily if it was what they were used to rather than technically correct, so why make it harder for them?

Rosgrana

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 224
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #347 on: November 24, 2013, 01:00:44 PM »
Wracked with pain/guilt etc.

I know the writer really means racked, as in tortured, but it always gives me a vision of someone being beaten with large clumps of seaweed, which tends to make me snicker instead of sympathise.

Elisabunny

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1358
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #348 on: November 24, 2013, 01:44:42 PM »
Wracked with pain/guilt etc.

I know the writer really means racked, as in tortured, but it always gives me a vision of someone being beaten with large clumps of seaweed, which tends to make me snicker instead of sympathise.

I just checked my Oxford Dictionary of English, and it says that both are correct in that context.
You must remember this: a ghoti is still a fish...

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11767
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #349 on: November 24, 2013, 02:11:44 PM »
Wracked with pain/guilt etc.

I know the writer really means racked, as in tortured, but it always gives me a vision of someone being beaten with large clumps of seaweed, which tends to make me snicker instead of sympathise.

You rack your brain, but you're nerve-wracked.  I tend to default to "wracked" instead of "racked" for most of the ambiguous usages, but it's one of those things that really can go either way.

BeagleMommy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3184
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #350 on: November 25, 2013, 03:10:37 PM »
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!

Yes, I understand that Mr. and Dr. are abbreviations as well, but you still don't pronounce them as they are spelled.

Just stop it!

mrs_deb

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 905
  • I didn't expect THAT to happen!
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #351 on: November 25, 2013, 09:10:04 PM »
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!


Are you in Boston?  I don't think I've ever heard anyone say the entire word here!  It's Comm Ave, Dot Ave, Harvard Ave...

BeagleMommy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3184
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #352 on: November 26, 2013, 01:09:34 PM »
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!


Are you in Boston?  I don't think I've ever heard anyone say the entire word here!  It's Comm Ave, Dot Ave, Harvard Ave...

Nope, Northeastern Pennsylvania.  It's pretty prevalent here as well.

jaxsue

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10229
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #353 on: November 26, 2013, 01:25:27 PM »
"Ave." is an abbreviation for the word "avenue".  People, it is not an actual word.  You do not pronounce the abbreviations for street (St.), lane (Ln.), boulevard (Blvd.) or Court (Ct.).  Why, on earth, would you pronounce this as "ah-v"?!


Are you in Boston?  I don't think I've ever heard anyone say the entire word here!  It's Comm Ave, Dot Ave, Harvard Ave...

Nope, Northeastern Pennsylvania.  It's pretty prevalent here as well.

Common here in NJ, too.

Danika

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1944
  • I'm not speeding. I'm qualifying.
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #354 on: April 05, 2014, 10:05:48 PM »
I had to resurrect this zombie thread because I saw this in the entrance of a restaurant the other night!

I can't stand bad grammar, but I think it's considerably worse when it wasn't double-checked and a lot of money was spent to have a sign made and displayed.


squeakers

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1775
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #355 on: April 05, 2014, 11:47:00 PM »
I'm not seeing the bad grammar? (Nothing new about that, though.)
"I feel sarcasm is the lowest form of wit." "It is so low, in fact, that Miss Manners feels sure you would not want to resort to it yourself, even in your own defense. We do not believe in retaliatory rudeness." Judith Martin

Liliane

  • Licensed to Squee
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 658
    • My Dreamwidth
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #356 on: April 05, 2014, 11:52:21 PM »
I'm not sure I see it either. Is "sat before me" bad grammar in this case, or am I missing it entirely?
~I'm just standing with you, in the darkness between battles~


Mel the Redcap

  • Scheming Foreign Hussy!
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 970
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #357 on: April 05, 2014, 11:52:58 PM »
I'm not seeing the bad grammar? (Nothing new about that, though.)

It should be "seated", not "sat".
"Set aphasia to stun!"

Onyx_TKD

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1380
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #358 on: April 06, 2014, 12:48:35 AM »
I'm not seeing the bad grammar? (Nothing new about that, though.)

It should be "seated", not "sat".

IME, "being seated" is more common terminology for being shown to a seat in a restaurant, but "being sat" is also a commonly used variation. I had thought "being sat" was a regional or colloquial usage (which I would consider perfectly reasonable to use on a sign). However, Merriam-Webster online (m-w.com) lists this meaning without any reference to it being non-standard.

Definition of "sat":
Quote
past and past participle of sit

From the definition of "sit":
Quote
transitive verb
1
:  to cause to be seated :  place on or in a seat often used with down
...
4
:  to provide seats or seating room for

That seems to fit what they do in a restaurant to me.

bansidhe

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2073
    • The Menagerie
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #359 on: April 06, 2014, 03:05:28 AM »
All of the above. Really, all 24 pages.  ;D

"Being sat" makes my skin crawl.

My latest pet peeve is the incorrect use of apostrophes in ages. Over and over again I see sentences like, "Hannah was three-years-old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska" and "Mike Connor, who is thirty-years-old, was arrested on Monday."

Correct: Hannah was three years old in 2001 when her family moved to Alaska.
Correct: In 2001, three-year-old Hannah moved to Alaska with her family.

Correct: Mike Connor, who is thirty years old, was arrested on Monday.
Correct: Thirty-year-old Mike Connor was arrested on Monday.
Esan ozenki!

Arizona