General Etiquette > Life...in general

Appropriate thank you in Chinese culture

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Twik:
I can see why making too much of an effort to make the gift "culturally appropriate" might be seen as patronizing. But if anyone ever wants to reward me with a haggis, I will have nothing untoward to say about it.

Psychopoesie:

--- Quote from: Katana_Geldar on September 19, 2013, 07:16:44 PM ---
--- Quote from: EllenS on September 19, 2013, 03:58:26 PM ---I think picking an ethnically-themed gift, is quite different from trying to avoid anything that might be accidentally offensive, or learning something that might be extra-special like the oranges.  Anyone might enjoy a citrus basket, but if oranges have a positive traditional meaning, that is even better.  I learned something from Gmama's post, and am glad to know, as a set of kitchen knifes is a very common wedding gift in the US.  Now I know that would not be a good choice for my Chinese-American friends.

--- End quote ---
Even I. Western culture a knife can be considered a bad luck gift as it can cut the relationship between you. Some people will "buy" the gift off the giver for a small denomination doing (like a cent of five cents).

--- End quote ---

Same as me (western, not chinese background) - if you give knife or scissors (anything that can cut the love), there has to be a token purchase to avoid the bad luck.

Also reminds me that it's bad luck to give an empty purse - a coin is usually included to pass along prosperity rather than poverty.

MissKitty:
Hi all, OP here.


--- Quote ---I think picking an ethnically-themed gift, is quite different from trying to avoid anything that might be accidentally offensive, or learning something that might be extra-special like the oranges. 
--- End quote ---

The latter above is what I was looking for.  I do feel awkward giving something from Chinese culture just because they are Chinese, but I also did not want to give something that would be inadvertently offensive.  Now that I know fruit would be welcome, I am probably going to go with that since I am way too slammed at work to bake right now.

I am also interested in the discussion about giving kitchen knives as a wedding gift.  A few years ago I gave a very nice set of knives to some friends getting married and they were thrilled.  In fact the groom (who does a lot of cooking) was so excited he was jumping up and down.  They had wanted to register for them but thought they were too expensive.  Either way, it hasn't seemed to affect their marriage since they are very happy and have two great kids now.   :)

Thanks again for all the good ideas for helping me learn something new.

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