Author Topic: You're in my spot..  (Read 6785 times)

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heartmug

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2013, 04:25:12 PM »
I wonder if you left a sweater or a jacket in the chair when you got up it, if that would signal to people that that certain chair is taken?
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rose red

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2013, 05:23:48 PM »
I would put my name on it to make it look like a movie director's chair.  Then say "Excuse me, I need my chair back."  If they make a fuss, then explain about your back and that's why you had to buy that chair and oh, you'll be happy to tell them where they can buy their own.

Oh Joy

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2013, 06:06:08 PM »
I think it depends very much on the situation. 

In some environments - especially around the fire - seats are very communal...X number of people, X number of chairs, and people come and go throughout the weekend.  Chairs get moved around to accommodate number of people, temperature, sun, smoke, etc. and none really belong to any individuals except people tend to sit in their own if it's available.  In these circumstances, if you (all 'you's general) leave your chair to get a drink or use the facilities, then it's still yours when you come back.  If you go take a nap or a hike, you select from the available seats when you get back.  If you want your furniture to be available when you return, remove it from the common area when you leave, then place it in the best available location when you return.  You don't get to reserve a location by leaving your property there, or make people remember it's yours and leave it empty or move it out of the way when trying to sit near each other to talk or sit the best distance from the fire.  In short, don't leave it in the common area if it's not for common use.

Part of etiquette is understanding norms and accommodating them as much as is practical, so I believe your answer really depends on the group.

kherbert05

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2013, 07:08:32 PM »
I wouldn't think twice about someone asking to use their own chair, why would you. Maybe because I have always had relatives with mobility issues that could only get in and out of certain chairs at the farm. You could sit in Aunt Gracie's chair, while she was in the house or doing whatever, but when she came outside you better jack-in-the-box out and offer to move it to the shade.


I had my own chair and my cousins knew that was mine. I remember once at a 4th of July party someone objected to me asking their kid to get out of my chair - after all he was little and I could sit on the grass/blanket. I was maybe 6 - 7 yo. Heads whipped around and the child was firmly told by my great-uncle to vacate my chair NOW. (I think someone else clued the mom in that I couldn't sit on the grass or blanket due to my skin allergies - but far as uncle Art was concerned that was my chair clearly marked with our family name the kid needed to get out of it.)
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Minmom3

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2013, 09:39:29 PM »
I don't think its rude, but I think it would go over better if you sort of announced it in advance. You don't have to make a big deal announcement but just let people know "I have some physical issues with a lot of the camp chair styles, so if you could just be mindful I'm going to need to always sit in one of the ones I brought" it will make it easier for them, as its more comfortable and relaxing to just pick a chair and sit in it, then to pick one sit then get up and move to another.

You might also want to make a point of making your chairs very super easy to spot - a big logo or something on them. My DH is picky abut his chair, so he got a Yankee's one instead of a generic, its easy to see at a glance due to the huge NY in foot high letters on it, another friend has a Canadian DH and their chairs are easy to spot because they are red & white with the maple leaf. So often camp chairs are quite similar at quick glance, and the differences are only noticeable if you are looking for them; make it so the difference in your chair is ridiculously obvious to make it easy for friends to accommodate you.

When we went to the County Fair when the girls were in 4-H, there was massive chair theft.  Sometimes actual theft, sometimes just borrowing, sometimes just goofing around - but frequently aggravating and frustrating.  I bought a chair unlike anybody else's, made a stencil and spray painted my name ALL OVER the chair - front, back and both sides of the head rest.  I never had any problems bumping people out of it, or repossessing it after I did that.  I had the name tag on me that matched the name on the chair. 10 years later, you can still read it, too!   ;D  The kids had more common chairs, and we hand painted their names on them with fabric paint - they didn't WANT the stenciled name like mine. 
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ladyknight1

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2013, 10:23:14 PM »
I have similar chairs and similar issues with people occupying them when I am up. I ask them to move.

VorFemme

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2013, 11:20:39 PM »
I had to leave early from a camping trip.  The the folding chairs rhat came home with VorGuy were not the two chairs I took, new from the store.  One was not even a match to the case...at least the right tent and sleeping bags came home - with me.

He claims that he got what was left - next time I go there will be names on our (new) chairs.
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LifeOnPluto

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #22 on: September 24, 2013, 11:42:38 PM »
I recommend saying "I need my chair back now, [Other Person]." accompanied by a pleasant smile. If they kick up a fuss, you can state that you have a bad back and only this chair - YOUR chair - will suit.

I don't really like the idea of asking. Eg "Do you mind swapping seats?" because to me, it gives the other person more leverage to refuse your request.


Danika

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #23 on: September 25, 2013, 01:24:18 AM »
I think without JADEing, you might come across as a special snowflake asking to have that specific chair back. So you're setting yourself up for long explanations.

This is what I'd do instead:

I wonder if you left a sweater or a jacket in the chair when you got up it, if that would signal to people that that certain chair is taken?

Does your chair have a cup holder? I'd get a drink (sodapop, beer, water bottle) at the beginning of the event and leave my open drink in the cup holder. People are less likely to pick your drink up (or your sweater) and move it. Less likely, although it still could happen.

Raintree

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #24 on: September 25, 2013, 02:41:10 AM »
"Sorry, do you mind sitting in one of the other chairs? I had to buy this one specially because I can't sit in most camp chairs." You could add that the other ones hurt your back, or something.

If someone said that to me, I wouldn't mind at all, and I would move.

CaffeineKatie

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2013, 03:04:52 AM »
Yep, I had to pay triple for a camp chair that will support my weight, so I would definitely want it.  One good thing about being plus-size--it's visible, and no one can argue I'm being a SS when I say "nope, I have to sit in MY chair or I'll end up crushing any other chair."  I like the idea of Hollywood-ish name stencils, though!

lowspark

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2013, 08:39:19 AM »
I think it depends very much on the situation. 

In some environments - especially around the fire - seats are very communal...X number of people, X number of chairs, and people come and go throughout the weekend.  Chairs get moved around to accommodate number of people, temperature, sun, smoke, etc. and none really belong to any individuals except people tend to sit in their own if it's available.  In these circumstances, if you (all 'you's general) leave your chair to get a drink or use the facilities, then it's still yours when you come back.  If you go take a nap or a hike, you select from the available seats when you get back.  If you want your furniture to be available when you return, remove it from the common area when you leave, then place it in the best available location when you return.  You don't get to reserve a location by leaving your property there, or make people remember it's yours and leave it empty or move it out of the way when trying to sit near each other to talk or sit the best distance from the fire.  In short, don't leave it in the common area if it's not for common use.

Part of etiquette is understanding norms and accommodating them as much as is practical, so I believe your answer really depends on the group.

I don't really understand this logic. If people want a chair to sit on for the weekend, they should bring their own. If everyone brings their own, why would there ever be any need to sit in someone else's chair? It's not like these chairs cost a fortune. They are really pretty cheap. If your chair is in the sun and you want to sit in the shade, move it. It's not necessary to sit in someone else's chair, just put your chair where you want it to be.

Now, if it's a situation of people not bringing their own and expecting to sit in someone else's chair all weekend, well then... too bad so sad. When I return to the campfire from wherever I've been, I want to sit in my own chair. If you brought your chair, then go sit in it. If you didn't bring one and are just figuring to use other peoples' then go sit in some other chair till its owner returns.

I just don't see anything at all wrong with saying, This is my chair and I want to sit in it, and expecting the person to vacate. In my opinion, no one should be sitting in my chair in the first place. They can move my chair out of the way if I'm not in it, but they should be sitting in their own chair.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2013, 08:45:45 AM »
I do a camping trip every year with upwards of 20 people there.  There is always a wide assortment of chairs.  People will sit in any chair when there are a lot of us milling about, prepping meals and so on when there aren't enough bums sitting to worry about anybody having their own chair.  But when it comes time for campfire?  Everyone sits in the chair they brought.  Without exception.

I've actually never had to kick anyone out of my chair, except my nephews when they were little and they were just sitting in my chair to be mischievious.

The only time I've had to kick someone out was when I was one of the few people to actually bring a chair.  But even then, I've only had to catch their attention and ask for my chair back.  Only had an issue once and the guy was a bacon fed knave all the time so it didn't bother me to get a little shirty with him to boot him out.
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ladyknight1

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2013, 08:46:02 AM »
I think it depends very much on the situation. 

In some environments - especially around the fire - seats are very communal...X number of people, X number of chairs, and people come and go throughout the weekend.  Chairs get moved around to accommodate number of people, temperature, sun, smoke, etc. and none really belong to any individuals except people tend to sit in their own if it's available.  In these circumstances, if you (all 'you's general) leave your chair to get a drink or use the facilities, then it's still yours when you come back.  If you go take a nap or a hike, you select from the available seats when you get back.  If you want your furniture to be available when you return, remove it from the common area when you leave, then place it in the best available location when you return.  You don't get to reserve a location by leaving your property there, or make people remember it's yours and leave it empty or move it out of the way when trying to sit near each other to talk or sit the best distance from the fire.  In short, don't leave it in the common area if it's not for common use.

Part of etiquette is understanding norms and accommodating them as much as is practical, so I believe your answer really depends on the group.

I don't really understand this logic. If people want a chair to sit on for the weekend, they should bring their own. If everyone brings their own, why would there ever be any need to sit in someone else's chair? It's not like these chairs cost a fortune. They are really pretty cheap. If your chair is in the sun and you want to sit in the shade, move it. It's not necessary to sit in someone else's chair, just put your chair where you want it to be.

Now, if it's a situation of people not bringing their own and expecting to sit in someone else's chair all weekend, well then... too bad so sad. When I return to the campfire from wherever I've been, I want to sit in my own chair. If you brought your chair, then go sit in it. If you didn't bring one and are just figuring to use other peoples' then go sit in some other chair till its owner returns.

I just don't see anything at all wrong with saying, This is my chair and I want to sit in it, and expecting the person to vacate. In my opinion, no one should be sitting in my chair in the first place. They can move my chair out of the way if I'm not in it, but they should be sitting in their own chair.

POD

I am very active in outdoor activities and spend a lot of time in areas where your bring your chair or your don't sit. They are not communal unless provided by the group, IME.

Winterlight

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Re: You're in my spot..
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2013, 08:56:40 AM »
I wonder if you left a sweater or a jacket in the chair when you got up it, if that would signal to people that that certain chair is taken?

This makes sense.
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