Author Topic: Non-fast food drive thrus  (Read 10660 times)

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Psychopoesie

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #105 on: September 27, 2013, 11:53:26 AM »
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

I use internet banking to deposit the money in the friend's account. All I need to know is their bank branch and account number. & I type in a little free text description of what it's for (e.g., weddinggiftLiz, payforboattrip or whatever).

It's something I'd do if we were all chipping in for something like a wedding gift for a friend, concert tickets or something like that where it was easier for one person to do the organising. It's handy if you don't live near the other person or won't have time to see them to physically hand over the money.

perpetua

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #106 on: September 27, 2013, 12:53:17 PM »
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

I use internet banking to deposit the money in the friend's account. All I need to know is their bank branch and account number. & I type in a little free text description of what it's for (e.g., weddinggiftLiz, payforboattrip or whatever).

It's something I'd do if we were all chipping in for something like a wedding gift for a friend, concert tickets or something like that where it was easier for one person to do the organising. It's handy if you don't live near the other person or won't have time to see them to physically hand over the money.

Yeah, I do that all the time if I'm giving a friend money for anything. I do it on my online banking. You put in the account number and sort code (don't know if you have those there? a 6-figure number that identifies the bank and branch in the format 12-34-56), put in the description and submit and off it goes. Then when it arrives in the recipient's account it'll show on the statement who it's from and the text field you typed in shows up as the reference for what it's for.

My dad sometimes transfers some money into my bank account but he doesn't have online banking, so he goes to his bank, fills out a slip with my sort code and account number on it, and hands it to the cashier and they do it.

I can't remember the last time I wrote a cheque. They started phasing them out here years ago. I haven't even had a chequebook for about 7 or 8 years, I don't think. All my monthly bills are done on direct debit, my rent goes out via standing order and I use my debit card for anything I buy in shops or online, which debits it directly from my account. I don't even use the cash machine that often.

Hillia

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #107 on: September 27, 2013, 12:59:02 PM »
If you have someone's routing number (sounds similar to teh sort code, a number that identifies the bank) and account number, there are ways you could use their account to pay your own bills.  That information is typically closely guarded in the US - you may trust your friend/family member, but it's something a lot of people wouldn't be comfortable sharing.

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stargazer

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #108 on: September 27, 2013, 01:02:48 PM »
Yeah I would not be sharing my account number with anyone!

I just used the drive thru at the coffee shop near my house today.  (And when I say near, I mean it's maybe a 10 minute walk.)  So why did I use the drive thru?  Because today is my one work from home day, I didn't feel like getting out of sweats, and I was picking up drinks and breakfast for myself and my DH.  So I was not going to carry 2 drinks + 2 breakfast sandwiches and it's a lot easier to have them just hand them to you in your car and you can put them in a cup holder to keep them from spilling.  Plus, it was COLD this morning!

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #109 on: September 27, 2013, 01:17:51 PM »
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

My US bank has the service and I think others do to. But both parties have to been signed up for this type of transfer (can be different banks).

For Wells Fargo and Bank of America customers, they sign into their online banking app. To receive it, you have to have an email reference to your account. So if I want to receive money I tell the person that email address and that I'm a BofA or Well's Fargo customer.

perpetua

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #110 on: September 27, 2013, 01:18:55 PM »
I'm trying to think of what a typical town centre in the UK would be like so I can describe it. There are many different types so there isn't really a 'typical' town, but this is pretty accurate for many of them.

I'm going to use the town of Woking in Surrey as an example, because I know it well. It's an average sized town by UK standards and has a population of about 65,000. It's a commuter town serving London (about 30 miles south west of the capital) and has a large railway station. The town centre consists of two or three fairly large shopping streets and two undercover shopping centres, what you guys would call 'malls'.

Most of the chain stores - clothes shops, homewares shops, shoe shops, mobile phone stores, department stores etc, are located in the malls.  There are two malls: Peacocks and Wolesey Place. Between them they house around 150 shops. Here's a list of what you'll find in there:

http://www.shoppingwoking.co.uk/shopping/

The larger one also contains a cinema and there's a theatre just off to the side of it too. There's a large car park on top of the bigger centre which has approximately 2000 spaces.

There are more shops on the outside shopping streets. There you'll find things like banks, estate agents, temp agencies, hairdressers, charity shops, cafes, market stalls, restuarants and pubs, basically anything that isn't a large chain.

In addition to all this, there are office buildings and other places of business where people would go to work.

All of this is concentrated into a fairly small area. Here's an arial shot of Woking to give you an idea of its size/layout: http://goo.gl/maps/x3I0o

You can see the town centre concentrated in the middle with the outlying residential areas around it.

Each of these main housing areas is on a bus route, so you can get a bus into town in about five or ten minutes. Buses are usually about ten minutes apart and the return fare into town is about £2.50 (although i've not been there in a few years, it may be more now).

There is also a small 'out of town' shopping area, what you guys would call a strip mall, I think, which has a big DIY superstore, a pet superstore, and places like that, and elsewhere on the outskirts of town there are a couple of large supermarkets with their own parking (Morrisons, Sainsbury's and a big Tesco in the next town) where people would go to do their weekly food shop.

So, you really can go 'into town' and do everything you need to do.

The majority of average-to-large sized UK towns are like this. Of course we have other types of towns too. There are very small towns which might have one shopping street (usually a throughfare through the middle of it), and villages, which are very small and predominantly residential and might have a local grocery shop, a pub, a small post office and a church. People who live in places like this would normally drive to the nearest town to take care of whatever they needed to.

Bigger cities like London and Birmingham are a bit different to this and it'd take a separate post to describe those.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2013, 01:21:36 PM by perpetua »

lowspark

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #111 on: September 27, 2013, 01:20:45 PM »
It's all about convenience. The same thing that motivates someone to drive through McDonalds is what motivates them to drive through the bank, the pharmacy, the cleaners, whatever. The business is offering the customer the convenience of doing business without getting out of the car. And yes, the customer takes advantage of that convenience. Why not?

I live in Houston where everything is completely spread out. We live in our cars. With very few exceptions, the city is simply not set up for walking. There are a few neighborhood areas where shopping/restaurants are concentrated and yes, those areas might have a drug store and a bank (not all do). Usually no grocery stores in those areas though. So for people who happen to live near those, maybe they can do most of their errands by walking. But for the vast majority of the population here, every errand is likely to be in a different direction and far away from each other.

In addition, I run my errands on my way home from work or on my lunch hour some times. So, I'm going to hop in my car and try to get it all done as fast as possible. So yeah, drive-up ATM? You bet. Drive through pharmacy and cleaners? Thank you!

I can see where it might not make sense in every city. But of course, as much as every person is different, so is every city. Just because one city is set up in a certain way doesn't mean every other city is.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #112 on: September 27, 2013, 01:27:58 PM »
bank to bank transfers are much more common overseas.  When I went to South America it was much more common for people to send money directly to people's accounts.  Esp in Brazil
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Hillia

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #113 on: September 27, 2013, 01:43:24 PM »

My US bank has the service and I think others do to. But both parties have to been signed up for this type of transfer (can be different banks).

For Wells Fargo and Bank of America customers, they sign into their online banking app. To receive it, you have to have an email reference to your account. So if I want to receive money I tell the person that email address and that I'm a BofA or Well's Fargo customer.

But it's *only* between Wells Fargo and BOA - if I want to get money to my son's account at a credit union or other bank, it won't work.

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jaxsue

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #114 on: September 27, 2013, 01:44:18 PM »
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I wish the traditional check would go out of fashion here, but it is slowly disappearing. Our bank apps also allow us to transfer funds to people. I can tell you that seeing someone pull out a checkbook at the grocery store is very uncommon now; most people use debit cards instead.

jaxsue

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #115 on: September 27, 2013, 01:46:09 PM »
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

There are definitely limits right now. I'm hoping that in the near future it will become easy to do transfers from any bank to any account.

ladyknight1

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #116 on: September 27, 2013, 01:57:09 PM »
If you have someone's routing number (sounds similar to teh sort code, a number that identifies the bank) and account number, there are ways you could use their account to pay your own bills.  That information is typically closely guarded in the US - you may trust your friend/family member, but it's something a lot of people wouldn't be comfortable sharing.

Routing numbers are public information.

stargazer

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #117 on: September 27, 2013, 02:05:00 PM »
If you have someone's routing number (sounds similar to teh sort code, a number that identifies the bank) and account number, there are ways you could use their account to pay your own bills.  That information is typically closely guarded in the US - you may trust your friend/family member, but it's something a lot of people wouldn't be comfortable sharing.

Routing numbers are public information.

Account numbers aren't though.  My DH and I have set up transfers between our accounts (we both have Wells Fargo) and my dad and I have the same thing, but I would not be comfortable giving that information to anyone but close family.  Certainly not to just any friend who owes me money.

Sophia

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #118 on: September 27, 2013, 05:35:01 PM »
My credit union doesn't even let me transfer money into my parent's account in the same bank.  They used to, but they stopped that.  I guess when I got married and they realized I was an adult. 

camlan

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #119 on: September 27, 2013, 05:37:28 PM »
The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account. I think, on a similar thread about banking a while ago, someone said that in their country, there is one account number for transferring money to an account and a second, separate, number for transferring money out of the account. Until we get something like that, individuals transferring money between their bank accounts is not going to happen on a regular basis.

You need to keep in mind that until about 1990, no bank was allowed to have branches in more than one state. There might be banks with the same name in two or more states, but they were set up to be separate entities. There is no one bank with branches in all 50 states, although we are starting to get more internet-only banks. There is no national bank. Nothing like the UK system where people can have savings accounts at the Post Office. There are states which have regulations that make it difficult or impossible to get a bank account if you have a really low credit score or other credit problems, so there is a surprising amount of people who do not have a bank account.

As a result of this, banks aren't used to working together in a way that helps the individual bank customer. There are still a lot of old regulations on the books.
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