Author Topic: Non-fast food drive thrus  (Read 13501 times)

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WillyNilly

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #120 on: September 27, 2013, 05:49:27 PM »
In the US your routing number and account number are printed on the bottom every check you write - its how the bank knows it s legitimate check. So every time you hand someone, anyone, a check you are giving them your routing number and account number.

ladyknight1

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #121 on: September 27, 2013, 06:01:35 PM »
Yes, we had a check that was sent with a bill stolen out of the mail and our account was hijacked. It took two months to fix it all.  :(

Sophia

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #122 on: September 27, 2013, 06:02:39 PM »
In the US your routing number and account number are printed on the bottom every check you write - its how the bank knows it s legitimate check. So every time you hand someone, anyone, a check you are giving them your routing number and account number.
It is like handing someone your credit card.  There is a lot of trust involved, and prosecution when people are caught. 

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #123 on: September 27, 2013, 06:05:39 PM »
Whereas in Australia, we have the Big 4 banks that have branches everywhere. Commonwealth, NAB, ANZ and Westpac. There are smaller banks, but these are the main ones.

The Commonwealth Bank used to be owned by the government until it was sold.

And here electronic transfers between banks are no issue at all. But getting someone's BSB number and account isn't enough to withdraw funds, as they'd need your ID and signature as well. Think of it like giving some you're address as opposed of the keys to your house.

Companies will often put account details on invoices.

Yvaine

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #124 on: September 27, 2013, 06:14:27 PM »
Most checks I get aren't paychecks. I might pick up something for my sisyer and she pays me with a check, that kind of thing.

My bank has an app that allows you to scan checks for deposit. I love the convenience!
Coming from a country where the cheque has been out of use that most people wouldn't know what to do with one if they got one, even this seems too inconvenient, compared to just transfering the money to the other persons bank account.

I have never had access to another adult's bank account to be able to do a direct transfer.  Not every bank supports transfers from outside institutions; my bank only accepts transfers from 1 other national chain.  Anyone else would have to send a check.

Yeah, here we don't do bank transfers for personal transactions like giving $20 to your friend. One might write a check or just give them cash, or if you and they are both internet savvy you might paypal it to them. How does the bank transfer thing work? Do you have their account number and have to fill out a form with their bank and so on? Not snarking, just unfamiliar with the process.

I use internet banking to deposit the money in the friend's account. All I need to know is their bank branch and account number. & I type in a little free text description of what it's for (e.g., weddinggiftLiz, payforboattrip or whatever).

It's something I'd do if we were all chipping in for something like a wedding gift for a friend, concert tickets or something like that where it was easier for one person to do the organising. It's handy if you don't live near the other person or won't have time to see them to physically hand over the money.

Gotcha! So it's actually kind of similar to the process of paypal'ing it to them, it's just that in the US we tend to do that with the paypal middleman in between so nobody knows each other's account number--just their email address.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #125 on: September 27, 2013, 07:18:48 PM »
It's also worth noting that a pretty fair percentage of Americans don't have bank accounts at all.  (A quick Google search says 8% overall but dramatically overrepresented by minorities - ~20% of African-American families don't have savings or checking accounts.)  This is almost entirely among the poorer population, which is especially bad because those people then have to go to check-cashing places and pay extra fees to get paychecks cashed.  Now banks, grocery stores, and independent cashing firms will all happily cash your check, but they'll charge you $2-$6 for the privilege (and sometimes even more, if they're charging a percentage instead of a flat fee).  Add up $6 coming out of each and every paycheck you make and you're looking at ~$150 a year that more affluent people (those who have enough cash on hand to keep a bank account open) don't have to pay.  People living paycheck to paycheck also are at risk for overdraft and other bank fees, which can quickly eat up any extra money they've been able to save  :-\

perpetua

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #126 on: September 27, 2013, 07:25:44 PM »
The thing is, here in the US, if you have someone's routing number and account number, you could just as easily take money out as put it into their account.

I'm not understanding how this could happen. How would someone take money out of your account using just the account number and routing number (I presume that's what we call a sort code)? Do you not have to show ID if you withdraw money at a bank in America?

And like someone says, every time you give someone a cheque, that information is there for all to see.

perpetua

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #127 on: September 27, 2013, 08:17:28 PM »
It's also worth noting that a pretty fair percentage of Americans don't have bank accounts at all.  (A quick Google search says 8% overall but dramatically overrepresented by minorities - ~20% of African-American families don't have savings or checking accounts.)  This is almost entirely among the poorer population, which is especially bad because those people then have to go to check-cashing places and pay extra fees to get paychecks cashed.  Now banks, grocery stores, and independent cashing firms will all happily cash your check, but they'll charge you $2-$6 for the privilege (and sometimes even more, if they're charging a percentage instead of a flat fee).  Add up $6 coming out of each and every paycheck you make and you're looking at ~$150 a year that more affluent people (those who have enough cash on hand to keep a bank account open) don't have to pay.  People living paycheck to paycheck also are at risk for overdraft and other bank fees, which can quickly eat up any extra money they've been able to save  :-\

Is there a particular reason for that? Bank fees? Credit scores too low to open one?

Most of our banks offer a basic no frills account, which allows you to have your wages paid in, direct debits to go out and you get a cash machine card/debit card. You can't go overdrawn on those accounts so you don't have to pass a credit check to get one.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #128 on: September 27, 2013, 09:00:45 PM »
It's also worth noting that a pretty fair percentage of Americans don't have bank accounts at all.  (A quick Google search says 8% overall but dramatically overrepresented by minorities - ~20% of African-American families don't have savings or checking accounts.)  This is almost entirely among the poorer population, which is especially bad because those people then have to go to check-cashing places and pay extra fees to get paychecks cashed.  Now banks, grocery stores, and independent cashing firms will all happily cash your check, but they'll charge you $2-$6 for the privilege (and sometimes even more, if they're charging a percentage instead of a flat fee).  Add up $6 coming out of each and every paycheck you make and you're looking at ~$150 a year that more affluent people (those who have enough cash on hand to keep a bank account open) don't have to pay.  People living paycheck to paycheck also are at risk for overdraft and other bank fees, which can quickly eat up any extra money they've been able to save  :-\

Is there a particular reason for that? Bank fees? Credit scores too low to open one?

Most of our banks offer a basic no frills account, which allows you to have your wages paid in, direct debits to go out and you get a cash machine card/debit card. You can't go overdrawn on those accounts so you don't have to pass a credit check to get one.

A lot of banks have started pulling credit scores in order to even open up a basic savings account.  I have a credit union account and they will allow you to open a basic savings account.  A lot of people don't know that many credit unions are part of a nationwide network that allows members to go to any network credit union to handle account issues.  the only thing you can't do is open up loan accounts.

Also quite a few banks here charge a fee unless you have a certain amount of money in your account.  They also charge a fee if you go to another banks ATM, so you can get hit with 2 withdrawal fees.

Hillia

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #129 on: September 27, 2013, 09:13:31 PM »
There are also ID requirements; not everyone has a government-issued ID, especially folks in the same population that can't get a bank account for other reasons.

To get someone's money with just routing/bank account info: you can't just go in and withdraw it, but you could pay bills online with that info, depending on the site.

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Joeschmo

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #130 on: September 27, 2013, 09:53:12 PM »
A couple of other reasons not to have a bank account are if you've overdrated previously and not payed it off some banks won't give you a checking account although I don't know if this applies to savings.  Another reason would be if you owe money to companies and there is a judgement by the courts against you to pay it your entire bank account could be taken as a garnishment except for $0.01.

guihong

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #131 on: September 28, 2013, 10:29:36 AM »
The interstate system, started in the 1950's, pulled a lot of business out of small towns and closer to the interchanges.  Also, the rise of suburbs from after WWII contributed to a lot more sprawl than in England, for instance.  We just have more space to spread out!

Many small rural towns, especially county seats, still have a "town square" and the courthouse close by, but the coming of Wal-Marts and big box stores like that pull business outwards to the outskirts.  It's nice to see downtowns revitalized, though.   In the days before automobiles, of course, people would bring their horses and buggies and tie them up outside the buildings.  But like someone else said, "Downtown" of a large-ish city tends to be mostly skyscrapers, old churches, and historical buildings.   Little Rock, for instance, began with the Statehouse right on the river and mushroomed outwards.

What's interesting is the difference in city planning from East to West in this country, from those areas that used to be the colonies, out to the "West".




Thipu1

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #132 on: September 28, 2013, 11:36:04 AM »
We also have to remember that, after WWII, Americans entered into a great love affair with the automobile.  In the 1950's, drive-in movies became very popular.  There were also drive-in churches. Cars were within the price range of almost everyone. 

There's an interesting story about how far this went.  In order to protest racial inequality, there was a plan for African-Americans to drive their cars and block the entrances to the 1964 World's Fair in Flushing, NY.  The Soviet Union was all set to play this up as an example of how horrible conditions were in the USA until someone at Tass figured out that they couldn't do it because, 'These oppressed people are staging a protest by driving their cars.  Our people don't have cars.' 


jalutaja

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #133 on: September 28, 2013, 04:05:57 PM »
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?

You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

But movies are pastime of workers, common people, not just for the rich who have personal cars!

OK, now we do have many cars ... but most movie houses have been closed, so still a no-go here!

Hillia

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Re: Non-fast food drive thrus
« Reply #134 on: September 28, 2013, 04:17:18 PM »
Not exactly a drive-through, but do other countries have drive-in movie theaters?

You mean - only for the rich people, who own cars?

But movies are pastime of workers, common people, not just for the rich who have personal cars!

OK, now we do have many cars ... but most movie houses have been closed, so still a no-go here!

In the US, many people own cars, not just the wealthy.  And drive in movies are actually more affordable than regular movies for families with children.  Regular movie theaters charge by the person, and you cannot bring your own food/drink in, but must purchase it at high prices at the snack bar.  A drive in charges by the carload, and you can bring your own food/drink.  Plus a drive in generally features two movies for one admission, so you can load up the car with kids, park in the parking lot, and pass out the munchies and juice boxes.  As the kids fall asleep, just bed them down in the back seat or on an air mattress in the back of the truck.

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