Author Topic: What is the correct response in an unsual family situation?  (Read 5273 times)

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zyrs

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Re: What is the correct response in an unsual family situation?
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2013, 04:44:33 AM »
Are you the kind of person who might respond with an ascii picture?  It's vague enough to be taken in whatever good way the recipient wishes.

@}--,--'---

What does that mean?  I'd be flummoxed getting something like that in response to a post in memory of a dead parent, especially if the meaning isn't immediately obvious.

I think that is a rose.  At least it reminds me of one.

TootsNYC

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Re: What is the correct response in an unsual family situation?
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2013, 08:58:31 AM »
I think if you want to be kind, you can post a "hugs."
Or maybe "It is sad."
Or just ignore.

I probably wouldn't untag myself, particularly. You ARE in contact enough for them to have you as a "friend" on Facebook, which is at its MINIMUM appropriate for the surface social stuff. And this sort of falls in that category.


Twik

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Re: What is the correct response in an unsual family situation?
« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2013, 10:02:31 AM »
Are you the kind of person who might respond with an ascii picture?  It's vague enough to be taken in whatever good way the recipient wishes.

@}--,--'---

What does that mean?  I'd be flummoxed getting something like that in response to a post in memory of a dead parent, especially if the meaning isn't immediately obvious.

It's a rose. However, not everyone is going to see that represents "here is a virtual flower to show my sympathy."

Perhaps just "hugs" or "I'm thinking of you" would be best.
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starry diadem

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Re: What is the correct response in an unsual family situation?
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2013, 03:25:25 PM »
Are you the kind of person who might respond with an ascii picture?  It's vague enough to be taken in whatever good way the recipient wishes.

@}--,--'---

What does that mean?  I'd be flummoxed getting something like that in response to a post in memory of a dead parent, especially if the meaning isn't immediately obvious.

I think that is a rose.  At least it reminds me of one.

Ah. Now you've said that I can see it - a rose lying on its side. Thanks.
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aiki

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Re: What is the correct response in an unsual family situation?
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2013, 04:16:14 PM »
Y'know, I can see the sibling writing this on facebook worrying over whether to tag Roodabega or not. On one hand, Roodabega hasn't lost the person who actually parented them, while on the other hand Roodabega is family. I can imagine that Sibling has decided to err on the side of inclusiveness, and I can't fault them for that.

I don't think it needs a reply, but something noncommittal and comforting  like *hugs* would be fine.
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judecat

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Re: What is the correct response in an unsual family situation?
« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2013, 03:36:00 AM »
I had that situation happen to me 20 year ago.  I was the only one of my B-mother's children to be adopted out.  (I spent exactly 2 months of my life with her).Since my siblings and I were all fully adults by the time B-mom passed away,  they included me in the obituary as her daughter,  and I gave them condolences and a mass card and lots of sympathy for the loss of their parent.