Author Topic: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians  (Read 19723 times)

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Yvaine

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #210 on: October 04, 2013, 09:40:46 AM »
Oh, and if you get into grilled portobellos, I love them love them love them, and I'm a meat eater.

lowspark

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #211 on: October 04, 2013, 09:56:24 AM »
...and that is why this thread is so interesting. 
I was raised that it was positively a sin to run out of any major item when hosting.  I could see myself being the host of the party where the meat substitutes ran out.  And being mortified.  So, I now know to round up to a greater amount.


Or again, just place it out of the main area and direct the vegetarians to it as it can be pricey as others noted. 


Or.... Don't make anything special for the vegetarians. Instead make enough main stream dishes that are naturally vegetarian. I'm not much of a fan of meat substitutes. In addition, putting myself in the place of a vegetarian, I would not want to be singled out and have food set aside for me* or have it be announced to the crowd not to partake of a particular dish because it was made specifically for me.

So for example, instead of making one meat lasagne, I'd make one meat and one veggie. Or set up a taco bar with make your own tacos, with meat and veg filling options. I recently hosted a baby shower and served heavy appetizers. One was a meat item. Everything else was veggie, but none of those things were meat subs, they were all things that were just naturally veg.

It's not that hard to make meatless items as principle parts of the meal. I just do that, making enough so that if everyone ate some of everything, there would still be plenty.

*I know I've advocated for doing just that and I still think it's the right thing to do if a limited amount of something is available and meant for those specific people. I'm just saying I wouldn't want it done for me.

Zilla

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #212 on: October 04, 2013, 10:17:34 AM »
...and that is why this thread is so interesting. 
I was raised that it was positively a sin to run out of any major item when hosting.  I could see myself being the host of the party where the meat substitutes ran out.  And being mortified.  So, I now know to round up to a greater amount.


Or again, just place it out of the main area and direct the vegetarians to it as it can be pricey as others noted. 


Or.... Don't make anything special for the vegetarians. Instead make enough main stream dishes that are naturally vegetarian. I'm not much of a fan of meat substitutes. In addition, putting myself in the place of a vegetarian, I would not want to be singled out and have food set aside for me* or have it be announced to the crowd not to partake of a particular dish because it was made specifically for me.




Well in the thread it has been said over and over that people like meat substitutes but won't buy enough for everyone.  If a quiet comment directly to the vegetarians of the party is offensive, that's surprising.  (I do agree with the announcement or the "reprimand" hey that's for...)  And it shouldn't be noticed in the "rush" of getting foods, enjoying party etc if one or two vegetarians step into the kitchen and pick up their yummy foods and slip back into the party.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2013, 10:19:05 AM by Zilla »

lowspark

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #213 on: October 04, 2013, 10:25:36 AM »
...and that is why this thread is so interesting. 
I was raised that it was positively a sin to run out of any major item when hosting.  I could see myself being the host of the party where the meat substitutes ran out.  And being mortified.  So, I now know to round up to a greater amount.


Or again, just place it out of the main area and direct the vegetarians to it as it can be pricey as others noted. 


Or.... Don't make anything special for the vegetarians. Instead make enough main stream dishes that are naturally vegetarian. I'm not much of a fan of meat substitutes. In addition, putting myself in the place of a vegetarian, I would not want to be singled out and have food set aside for me* or have it be announced to the crowd not to partake of a particular dish because it was made specifically for me.




Well in the thread it has been said over and over that people like meat substitutes but won't buy enough for everyone.  If a quiet comment directly to the vegetarians of the party is offensive, that's surprising.  (I do agree with the announcement or the "reprimand" hey that's for...)  And it shouldn't be noticed in the "rush" of getting foods, enjoying party etc if one or two vegetarians step into the kitchen and pick up their yummy foods and slip back into the party.

I never said it was offensive. Where do you see that? I said *I* would not want that done for me.
I would not want to be singled out. I would not want to feel like something were made especially for me that no one else would be allowed to eat. Read my * comment:

*I know I've advocated for doing just that and I still think it's the right thing to do if a limited amount of something is available and meant for those specific people. I'm just saying I wouldn't want it done for me.

And that's why I wouldn't do that sort of thing, myself, as host.

However, I do agree, as I said above, that if there's not enough for everyone, that's probably the best way to handle it.

Zilla

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #214 on: October 04, 2013, 11:53:56 AM »
Quote

I never said it was offensive. Where do you see that? I said *I* would not want that done for me.
I would not want to be singled out. I would not want to feel like something were made especially for me that no one else would be allowed to eat. Read my * comment:



I never said you said it was offensive.  I did read your post, thanks.

snowdragon

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #215 on: October 04, 2013, 12:12:14 PM »
This has been an interesting thread because it would have never occurred to me that a meat-eater might voluntarily eat a veggie burger or veggie sausage.  I've tried a bite of them when a veggie was trying to convert me and I thought they both pretty disgusting.  So, if I were hosting and providing meat substitutes, I would count the number of veggie guests.  Figure out how much they might eat, round up slightly, and buy that much.   

For accidentally veggie dishes like mushrooms, I would assume the 'market' was everyone and buy accordingly.

Different brands of burgers are different. Even different varieties of the same brands can be different. I won't touch a portobello for the life me - but a Morningstar Farms Garden Burger  is great- I will often have them in my freezer and eat them in semi-regular rotation. Given tho choice between those and a lot of other stuff, I will happily eat those....keep me from having them at BBQ because someone else is more worthy will often mean I don't get to eat that evening.

TootsNYC

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #216 on: October 04, 2013, 12:16:25 PM »


Also, it is generally considered rude to srcutinize or take to close attention to other's eating habits. Even your "only eat it once the vegetarians have made a plate" is requiring guests to rudely track other guest's food consumption. As a hostess, I have the responsiblilty to discreetly make sure all of my guests are well fed. But it's rude of another guest to pay that type of attention.


I see that as "only eat it once the vegetarians have had a CHANCE to make a plate."

If I go through a buffet line, and there's a plate of burgers w/ a little sign that says "vegetarian," I think that as a meat-eater, I should not take one of those burgers on my first time through the line. Ditto anything that's labeled "vegan" or "gluten free." If that's not my restriction, I wouldn't take it. Oh, if the macaroni & cheese were labeled "vegetarian" or the potato salad was "vegan," I'd take an ordinary helping of those, because those are mainstream dishes. But the **alternate** food--reg. burgers & veggie; reg. bread & gluten free; reg. pasta & vegan--I'd wait until the 2nd trip. (I don't think the host should have to make a big announcement if they've labeled the food.)   (oh, and if it looked like there was a big pile of the veggie burgers, I might be willing to break this rule of mine.)

And with any hosted buffet (as opposed to a restaurant), *everyone* should wait to make a 2nd trip (or take a 2nd serving, or a serving big enough to be 2) until after enough time has passed that everyone could have gone through once.

Should some other guest get caught up in a conversation and not make it through the line until later, then they're on their own--I agree that those w/ restricted diets have their own half of the equation to hold up.

ettiquit

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #217 on: October 04, 2013, 02:18:53 PM »


Also, it is generally considered rude to srcutinize or take to close attention to other's eating habits. Even your "only eat it once the vegetarians have made a plate" is requiring guests to rudely track other guest's food consumption. As a hostess, I have the responsiblilty to discreetly make sure all of my guests are well fed. But it's rude of another guest to pay that type of attention.


I see that as "only eat it once the vegetarians have had a CHANCE to make a plate."

If I go through a buffet line, and there's a plate of burgers w/ a little sign that says "vegetarian," I think that as a meat-eater, I should not take one of those burgers on my first time through the line. Ditto anything that's labeled "vegan" or "gluten free." If that's not my restriction, I wouldn't take it. Oh, if the macaroni & cheese were labeled "vegetarian" or the potato salad was "vegan," I'd take an ordinary helping of those, because those are mainstream dishes. But the **alternate** food--reg. burgers & veggie; reg. bread & gluten free; reg. pasta & vegan--I'd wait until the 2nd trip. (I don't think the host should have to make a big announcement if they've labeled the food.)   (oh, and if it looked like there was a big pile of the veggie burgers, I might be willing to break this rule of mine.)

And with any hosted buffet (as opposed to a restaurant), *everyone* should wait to make a 2nd trip (or take a 2nd serving, or a serving big enough to be 2) until after enough time has passed that everyone could have gone through once.

Should some other guest get caught up in a conversation and not make it through the line until later, then they're on their own--I agree that those w/ restricted diets have their own half of the equation to hold up.

I don't think I would look at a food labeled "vegetarian" and assume I shouldn't eat it because I'm a meat eater. We eat a lot of vegetarian meals (I love trying new tofu recipes) - we're even having veggie burgers tonight. I'd pick a portabello burger over a red meat one any day. It's part of my regular diet, so why would I not take the vegetarian option if that's what looks the best to me?

OTOH, I probably would avoid anything marked gluten-free because I'd be surprised that something like that would be served if there wasn't someone there with that restriction.

sunnygirl

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #218 on: October 04, 2013, 04:49:07 PM »
Personally I don't consider vegetarianism or religious food restrictions to always be a case of 'won't eat' rather than 'can't eat.' Sometimes it is, certainly, but not always.

Eating meat for the first time after a long period of vegetarianism (and even more so veganism) makes many people physically ill because their bodies can't digest it.

When it comes to religious food restrictions, it's hard to explain, but in some people who are very devout the psychological block is so strong it really would not be physically possible to bring themselves to do eat the food in question, and the person would likely become physically ill (either because their body isn't used to it, or as a psychosomatic response) if they did. I've seen people become extremely ill after finding out they'd accidentally eating even a tiny bit of ham broth. It's basically like if a someone was offered a human baby or their pet to eat - hypothetically you might be physically capable of eating a human baby, but in practice I think very few people would actually be able to bring themselves to do so - most people imo would consider that a "can't" rather than a "won't".

I know that's slightly off the topic - and that the posters describing vegetarianism/religious restrictions as a 'won't eat' situation or as pickiness weren't implying anything pejorative - but I think it is an important point. (Also I am not trying to imply that such restrictions are higher or more important than any other eating habits - and definitely if you "can't" eat something you have to take responsibility for your food.)
« Last Edit: October 04, 2013, 04:51:52 PM by sunnygirl »

darkprincess

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #219 on: October 04, 2013, 05:57:46 PM »
With the whole wont and can't debate. I don't think we can limit this to just vegetarian and religious. Some people are told to limit their red meat intake, so if they had bacon for breakfast and a roast beef sand which for lunch they can't eat the hamburger and should have the same dips of the veggie burger. When I had gestational diabetes I was told my plate had to have 1/2 veggie, 1/4 carb, and 1/4 protein. Depending on what else was being served I might have to have the veggie burger to get my plate to 1/2 veggie along with the hamburger (protein and carb mixed). Someone who is pregnant might not be allowed to have the meat hot dog or the pepperoni pizza because of nitrates.
I think it is better not to judge what people eat. The host needs to provide enough food and not make the guest try to guess what they are supposed to eat.

I also find it interesting that people are using price as a reasoning of why meat eaters shouldn't eat something. i thought it was considered rude to have two tiers of guests, one gets more expensive food or food that is perceived as better than others.  Hosts should have parties that they can afford that allow everyone access to the same food. If this means the BBQ is changed to a more reasonably priced chili feed so what. Have spaghetti and garlic bread instead of hamburgers and portobello mushrooms.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #220 on: October 04, 2013, 06:16:44 PM »
It isn't the cost to feed my guests that bothers me; it is the cost of leftover food I won't eat.  If there is leftover meat, it is no problem for me - I make up my own TV dinners for my lunches.  But I don't eat meat substitutes.  I can't take the processing of those kinds of food.  I will happily eat vegetarian food but I don't eat meat substitutes.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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TootsNYC

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #221 on: October 04, 2013, 06:27:50 PM »
I don't think I would look at a food labeled "vegetarian" and assume I shouldn't eat it because I'm a meat eater. We eat a lot of vegetarian meals (I love trying new tofu recipes) - we're even having veggie burgers tonight. I'd pick a portabello burger over a red meat one any day. It's part of my regular diet, so why would I not take the vegetarian option if that's what looks the best to me?

OTOH, I probably would avoid anything marked gluten-free because I'd be surprised that something like that would be served if there wasn't someone there with that restriction.


As I said, I wouldn't personally restrict myself for all vegetarian foods--but I would for those that looked to be the duplicate/option/alternate one. And I would restrict myself if the vegetarian ones didn't look like a big supply.

Because, why would they be labeled, unless (like the gluten free) there was definitely someone there with the food restriction? I figure the host knows the guest list and has a reason for labeling them.

So I'd wait, even if it did look best to me. Then, I'd definitely try them on the second time around.


Library Dragon

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #222 on: October 04, 2013, 07:42:22 PM »
As with many things it's location, location, location. 

If one BIL served both meat and veggie burgers I would definitely take the veggie because his meat burgers are always charcoal briquettes and he doesn't understand or appreciate quality in beef.  My friend K? Definitely the meat because they would be tasty and juicy. 

Labeling something as vegetarian would seem to me to be informational rather than a request not to take a serving.  Leftovers that I don't like? They go home with family and friends. 

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CluelessBride

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #223 on: October 04, 2013, 08:05:52 PM »
I guess I wouldn't see a vegi-burger as a direct replacement for a hamburger the same way I would see (for example) a gluten free apple pie as a replacement for an apple pie. Vegi-burgers taste nothing like hamburgers, and they really don't attempt to. And tons of non-vegetarians eat them for reasons other than avoiding meat because they enjoy them in their own right. So, I wouldn't expect vegi-burgers to be served for only vegetarians any more than I'd expect turkey burgers to be served only for Hindus. Hamburgers, turkey burgers, veggie burgers are just 3 completely different types of burgers.

From a hosting perspective, I think you* need to be careful when you start making special dishes that you don't share with your entire guest list to avoid two-tiered hosting. Offering filet mignon to only a subset of your guests because they don't eat sirloin while everyone else gets sirloin (since it is too expensive to serve everyone filet mignon) is clearly not okay. Setting aside a plate of gluten free food for a gluten free guest so that it doesn't get contaminated by other gluten dishes on the buffet or making an apple pie and gluten free apple pie and setting aside a piece of the latter for GlutenFreeSally ahead of time is (in my opinion) definitely okay.

Serving both beef burgers and veggie burgers, but only giving the veggie burgers to the vegetarians is somewhere in between - and I lean towards not okay. Especially if the quality of beef burgers is far inferior to the quality of veggie burgers (as they are likely to be if the cost/burger is much higher for the veggie burgers). It is definitely something that I would never do as a host.  And I say this as someone who personally dislikes the taste of veggie burgers and would choose the beef burger (or sides only if the burgers were really bad) over the veggie burger.

Yes, ending up with leftovers you don't like is less than ideal. But you can always send them home with guests or (in the case of burgers) only cook a few at a time and save the extras in the freezer for the next event.

*All  yous general.

LifeOnPluto

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Re: S/0 taking food for kids: taking food for vegetarians
« Reply #224 on: October 05, 2013, 01:46:41 AM »
Interesting to read about posters who say that they (or their friends) - as omnivores - would readily eat a meat-substitute over a proper meat product.

Perhaps this is a regional thing, or a know-your-audience thing? Because my circle of omnivore friends would definitely go for the proper meat product over a meat-substitute every time.