General Etiquette > Life...in general

SO on dog brushing rude

(1/8) > >>

darkprincess:
I was just reading the other post about a person complaining about a non-neighbor brushing their dog on the public sidewalk. Most people seem to think that the dog brusher wasn't rude. I actually don't think he was rude either but I feel uncomfortable with the idea of someone doing this outside my house.
Assuming that the action does not include littering, property damage, illegal behavior, blocking the entire walkway, and trespassing is there any action that would be rude to do on a public sidewalk that is not your neighborhood or the neighborhood of your host.
For example, what is the etiquette of driving to a neighborhood that you dont live in and are not visiting any people who live there and park and then play music and dance on the sidewalk? Sunbath? sit down on the curb and knit? Let your children play with chalk on the sidewalk? Teach your child how to ride a bike? Non emergency Car maintenance?

In my neighborhood which used to have a drug problem we would be very unfriendly to people who we didn't know who would park in the neighborhood and then not visit a neighbor. We worked with the police on our tactics and it was very effective. I have heard you can do similar tactics if prostitues are looking for business in the neighborhood. To get the dealers out of the neighborhood we even resorted to taking pictures of people like the dog brusher, writing down their license plate numbers, and asking them questions. "Why are here? Who are visiting? Do you need directions? Is there a reason you need to do whatever you are doing in this neighborhood?" It wasn't just one neighbor who would do it. Multiple people would come outside of our houses and harass the person as a group. You would be surprised by the things dealers would do to be in the neighborhood. Some would even walk their dog, play cards on the corner, once several grown adults played hopscotch.

gen xer:
 I walk and bike in other neighbourhoods and I wouldn't be too happy if I was hassled because I didn't live there.....I'm in Canada but last I checked it was still a free country.  If you are within the bounds of the law you can go where you want.  I think it would be very rude and presumptuous to question them.

Unless you know all your neighbours really well, stay home and watch out the window all the time how does anyone know who's who anyway?

Mental Magpie:

--- Quote from: gen xer on October 04, 2013, 02:36:23 PM --- I walk and bike in other neighbourhoods and I wouldn't be too happy if I was hassled because I didn't live there.....I'm in Canada but last I checked it was still a free country.  If you are within the bounds of the law you can go where you want.  I think it would be very rude and presumptuous to question them.

Unless you know all your neighbours really well, stay home and watch out the window all the time how does anyone know who's who anyway?

--- End quote ---

Walking and biking are completely different than the prolonged presences the OP mentioned.  I agree I would be pretty peeved if I was just passing through and was harassed, but I can see where strangers playing hopscotch on the sidewalk would raise eyebrows.

Lynn2000:
I think if your (general) neighborhood has a crime problem and you've resorted to working with the police on tactics to reduce this, that's beyond the scope of etiquette. I know there are "Neighborhood Watch" groups, for example, that are trained to take down license numbers, etc., of people doing suspicious things in their neighborhood. But again, I don't think that really has much to do with etiquette at that point.

I'm not a very confrontational person. If I saw someone who "seemed weird," I would either ignore them or call the police (non-emergency line probably). There's nothing in between for me.

On the etiquette spectrum, I think it's generally fine to approach someone carefully and ask, in a polite tone, if they need help. Like if they're lost or looking for a certain house or something. But if they say no, and they keep standing there doing whatever you thought was weird, I'm not sure there's much else to be done within the scope of etiquette. Either you think it's suspicious enough to call the police about, or you decide to ignore it. Multiple neighbors hassling a stranger might be an approved technique from a safety point of view, but not etiquette, I think.

Twik:

--- Quote from: gen xer on October 04, 2013, 02:36:23 PM --- I walk and bike in other neighbourhoods and I wouldn't be too happy if I was hassled because I didn't live there.....I'm in Canada but last I checked it was still a free country.  If you are within the bounds of the law you can go where you want.  I think it would be very rude and presumptuous to question them.

Unless you know all your neighbours really well, stay home and watch out the window all the time how does anyone know who's who anyway?

--- End quote ---

If you've never lived in a high-crime or red-light area, you may not realize just how your freedom to "go where you want" is infringed upon by criminals and their customers.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version