Author Topic: SO on dog brushing rude  (Read 3922 times)

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Surianne

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2013, 11:58:03 PM »
I think playing music on the sidewalk is rude if other people can hear it -- you're disturbing them.  Similarly, if you're blocking someone's way with your activity, it's rude.

But most of the examples given, such as teaching a child to ride a bike, or kids using sidewalk chalk, seem like very normal uses of the sidewalk to me.  I've never lived in a place where you're only allowed to spend time on your own street.  I go for walks and bike rides in other neighbourhoods all the time.  People are usually friendly and say hello, and don't seem to have a problem with it.  Kids play hopscotch on the sidewalk in front of my house, and it doesn't bother me -- I'm happy to see them having fun. 

snowdragon

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2013, 12:06:07 AM »
  Kids play hopscotch on the sidewalk in front of my house, and it doesn't bother me -- I'm happy to see them having fun.

this may be a function of local laws. In my area if you get hurt on the sidewalk in front of my house - you can sue me.

I have to maintain it and keep it clean, so yeah it would be many folks I know. 

gen xer

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2013, 10:18:51 AM »
I don't mean to be snarky either but is knitting, sunbathing, other weird activities etc really an issue?  I am kind of thinking it was just meant as a general question about being in other neighbourhoods other than your own.

Don't get me wrong I am not trying to be dismissive of issues in high crime neighbourhoods - I am just having a hard time wrapping my head around being able to have that kind of intimate knowledge of your neighbours and their doings that you would actually be able to question a stranger in that manner.  I have good friends in the neighbourhood but I don't know "everything" about them who they associate with. 

I just can't imagine that kind of hyper-vigilant monitoring of the neighbourhood.  Would it not take up an extraordinary amount of time?

Not really. I now live in a low crime area but we just had an INS bust because someone noticed that there were people she did not recognize going in and out of an apartment across the street. It takes being aware and being willing to interact with people. Some are better at than others.

I would notice certain things I suppose....but I am pretty oblivious to who's coming and going for the most part!

I guess some people are more inclined to observe that stuff - but I don't know....I mean I have some good friends in the neighbourhood, some neighbours I know by sight and to say hello and a bunch that I don't know at all.  I am either preoccupied with work, my friends, family, house etc to watch the neighbourhood. 

I would be worried about going looking for trouble.

darkprincess

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2013, 10:50:58 AM »
I guess I live in a very friendly and observant neighborhood. We know each other, talk to each other, take care of each others mail and pets when people go on vacation. We like to know about what is going on and share information with each other. The only neighbors that didn't like this were the group of people who rented a house together. They were eventually evicted after the third rave they hosted where they charged admission to their house and let underage people drink. The police shut them down each time.
Here are some actual things non neighbors have done on my block, many of them by suspected drug dealers:
Sunbathed,  the girl drove up took out a towel put it in the grass between sidewalk and street and stripped down to a bikini and then lied down for an hour.
Taught their son to ride a bike, drove up, took bike off back of car, rode up and down the street, then drove away (it is an old neighborhood and the sidewalks are not smooth.
A group of cars pulled up, turned on music and 20 people had a dance party and very obviously sold drugs.
A man pulled up and opened his hood and proceeded to change his headlights, there are no stores within one mile of us that sell car supplies.
A person pulled over and cleaned out his car using the neighbors garbage can to throw everything away. Then he drove off.
4 people drove up sat on the sidewalk and played craps ( a dice game) this has also happened with poker games.
There are three church parking lot within two blocks of our block. There are two parks within two blocks of us. The is a school with lots of parking, play toys and room to ride your bike within three blocks. I guess I just can't understand why someone would stop on our block or neighborhood when they could go to a park, empty parking lot, etc


Surianne

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2013, 07:37:21 PM »
  Kids play hopscotch on the sidewalk in front of my house, and it doesn't bother me -- I'm happy to see them having fun.

this may be a function of local laws. In my area if you get hurt on the sidewalk in front of my house - you can sue me.

I have to maintain it and keep it clean, so yeah it would be many folks I know.

I think we should probably leave legal debates out of the thread, since the laws will vary by location.

Psychopoesie

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2013, 10:45:12 PM »
*Snip*
Assuming that the action does not include littering, property damage, illegal behavior, blocking the entire walkway, and trespassing is there any action that would be rude to do on a public sidewalk that is not your neighborhood or the neighborhood of your host.
For example, what is the etiquette of driving to a neighborhood that you dont live in and are not visiting any people who live there and park and then play music and dance on the sidewalk? Sunbath? sit down on the curb and knit? Let your children play with chalk on the sidewalk? Teach your child how to ride a bike? Non emergency Car maintenance?
*snip*

For some reason, I suddenly want to all those things and see what happens. I think I'd enjoy drawing a hopscotch square and having a go.  ;)

Not sure any of the activities are rude, just unusual. As long as what they were doing was safe, legal and not obstructing any residents. Also assuming that it wasn't a cover for drug dealing (an unlikely scenario where I live). I might go out and make conversation to figure out what's going on but most probably not.

Lots of kids from the surrounding suburb like to come and skateboard or cycle over the steps in the footpath opposite my place, for example. They zoom across the road and end up in my driveway, turn back and go again. I don't know any of them.

I would find it rude if someone outside was playing their car stereo too loud. A few weeks back one of the tradespeople working on my neighbour's place left his car parked, doors open and stereo blaring, out the back of my place. Even with my windows closed & own stereo on, I couldn't block it out. That was rude.


Need to Change

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2013, 02:32:23 AM »
Every neighborhood problem I can remember, wherever I've lived -- and I've lived in a few dicey areas -- came either from actual neighbors being rude or committing criminal acts, or from "outside" people doing overtly suspicious things, like staring at people's houses (or running from them).

Based on my own experiences, I wouldn't think to question someone "new" who was just walking their dog, or just walking, for that matter.  If someone looked lost, I ask them if I can help (though they'll usually ask me first), but I've never lived in a gated community, nor one that is marked off as "private" in any way, so I expect to see unfamiliar faces now and again.

I hope we haven't gotten to the point where we must stick to our assigned spaces.

sweetonsno

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2013, 02:46:37 AM »
I think the same rules generally apply when one is in one's own neighborhood and when one is in a different neighborhood.

It's rude to make unnecessary noise, particularly for a prolonged period of time.

It's rude to make and leave a mess. (Pet waste, cigarette butts, wrappers, discarded toys, empty beverage containers, etc.)

It's rude to violate someone's privacy by looking into their windows or peering over the fence from the sidewalk.

It's rude to block the sidewalk. (Obviously, most people will give you a pass in an emergency, like if you or your child takes a bad fall.)

It's rude to tease and torment someone's pets.

It's rude to leave your car alarm blaring for half an hour.

The difference in your own neighborhood is that presumably, you know the homeowner. If your stereo is a bit too loud, they'll probably feel comfortable asking you to turn it down. If your kids want to practice skateboarding, you can ask your neighbors if they mind you setting up the temporary ramp. If they walk past and glance at the house when you're looking out the window, you just wave at each other. If you don't figure out that it's your car alarm going off, your neighbor will probably recognize that it's your car and drop you a line letting you know. Basically, the interactions can usually include normal, familiar communication.

Hmmmmm

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2013, 07:30:41 AM »
I guess I live in a very friendly and observant neighborhood. We know each other, talk to each other, take care of each others mail and pets when people go on vacation. We like to know about what is going on and share information with each other. The only neighbors that didn't like this were the group of people who rented a house together. They were eventually evicted after the third rave they hosted where they charged admission to their house and let underage people drink. The police shut them down each time.
Here are some actual things non neighbors have done on my block, many of them by suspected drug dealers:
Sunbathed,  the girl drove up took out a towel put it in the grass between sidewalk and street and stripped down to a bikini and then lied down for an hour.
Taught their son to ride a bike, drove up, took bike off back of car, rode up and down the street, then drove away (it is an old neighborhood and the sidewalks are not smooth.
A group of cars pulled up, turned on music and 20 people had a dance party and very obviously sold drugs.
A man pulled up and opened his hood and proceeded to change his headlights, there are no stores within one mile of us that sell car supplies.
A person pulled over and cleaned out his car using the neighbors garbage can to throw everything away. Then he drove off.
4 people drove up sat on the sidewalk and played craps ( a dice game) this has also happened with poker games.
There are three church parking lot within two blocks of our block. There are two parks within two blocks of us. The is a school with lots of parking, play toys and room to ride your bike within three blocks. I guess I just can't understand why someone would stop on our block or neighborhood when they could go to a park, empty parking lot, etc
The only one I don't see is odd is the bike ride teaching. The might live in an area not conducive to riding bikes.
The sun bather would have given me a laugh unless it became a daily activity and then I'd be bothered by the potential of her killing the grass. I think I'd assert my rights and join her on the lawn with some rowdy kids playing football.
The dance party drug selling should result in a call to police. I'm not sure how it wouldn't be considered public nuisance.

mandycorn

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #24 on: October 08, 2013, 06:07:59 PM »
Real estate advice suggests that when you're considering purchasing a property, you go check out the neighborhood at different times of day and see how noisy it is and get a feel for the environment, but I've never been sure exactly how to do that. Reading this thread, now I know! I could have stopped in front of my potential house for some sunbathing or craps-playing!

In all seriousness, most of the things mentioned in this thread would catch my attention if I noticed someone doing them in my neighborhood, and if the same person did it more than once, I might call the police non-emergency number to request that they check it out.
"The trouble with quotes on the Internet is that you never know if they are genuine" - Abraham Lincoln 

KenveeB

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #25 on: October 08, 2013, 06:52:11 PM »
Real estate advice suggests that when you're considering purchasing a property, you go check out the neighborhood at different times of day and see how noisy it is and get a feel for the environment, but I've never been sure exactly how to do that. Reading this thread, now I know! I could have stopped in front of my potential house for some sunbathing or craps-playing!

In all seriousness, most of the things mentioned in this thread would catch my attention if I noticed someone doing them in my neighborhood, and if the same person did it more than once, I might call the police non-emergency number to request that they check it out.

I was worried once or twice that someone might report me as suspicious to the police when I was house-hunting. I drove by a few potential houses very slowly, making a few passes, trying to get a look at them before or in addition to a showing. The house I ultimately bought, I drove by several times on weekends and before or after work. A few times I'd drive from my apartment to the house, then to work from there, or vice versa, so I could get an idea of the commute. I only got "caught" once -- right after I closed on the house, I drove by to look at it. (We were doing a leaseback for a month, so I couldn't actually move in yet. But I'd just bought it, darn it, and I was going to look at it and just grin!) I drove by once, then turned and came by again. The owners happened to be out front and noticed me. Luckily, one of them recognized me from the walkthrough. She said her husband asked, "Who is that?" and she said, "I think that's the owner of our house." :) So they waved me down to say hi.

Lynn2000

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2013, 02:16:33 PM »
Real estate advice suggests that when you're considering purchasing a property, you go check out the neighborhood at different times of day and see how noisy it is and get a feel for the environment, but I've never been sure exactly how to do that. Reading this thread, now I know! I could have stopped in front of my potential house for some sunbathing or craps-playing!

In all seriousness, most of the things mentioned in this thread would catch my attention if I noticed someone doing them in my neighborhood, and if the same person did it more than once, I might call the police non-emergency number to request that they check it out.

On checking out the neighborhood for a potential house purchase--even if someone reported your license number to the police, it would be pretty easy (and plausible) to explain what you were doing, and the fact that someone noticed and reported you would tell you something valuable about the neighborhood (good or bad is your own opinion). Or if you were walking around to check out the neighborhood and someone came up to question you, I think that would be a great opening for learning more about the neighborhood. "Hi! Yeah, we're thinking of buying that house over there and wanted to see what the neighborhood was like. How long have you lived here? Do you like it? Is it quiet?" Kind of turn the questions back on them and try to learn something useful. If, for example, you were more of a keep-to-yourself person, you would thus have learned that the neighborhood expects more participation, so maybe that's something to consider in your home buying.
~Lynn2000

Betelnut

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2013, 02:27:44 PM »
I like to walk around and so I do.  I would be very, very put out if someone questioned my right to walk down a public street. 
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GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #28 on: October 10, 2013, 02:44:13 PM »
Well I like looking at other people's house (specifically the fancy pants houses I'll probably never live in), so I often drive to other neighborhoods park and get out and go for a walk around (or a bike ride). Never thrown a dance party on the side of the road...not even in my college days.

I've also had cars breakdown on me and have to get into the first safe place I can which is often a neighborhood (or neighborhoods are kind of like...subdivisions), sometimes the repair is something I can do, sometimes it isn't.

I think it'd be odd behavior I'd notice before odd people. Like the drug dealer that lived next door to me. Gee...lots of people in and out all day, all kind of twitchy, something isn't right. I notified the leasing office, they called the cops, and hey look...drugs! But in our community now we have a nice kind of courtyard/mini park area, I've seen people who don't live in our town homes out there riding bikes, sunbathing, playing games, nothing I've ever thought was odd. Sometimes they know someone in the community, sometimes they don't.

shhh its me

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Re: SO on dog brushing rude
« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2013, 02:58:34 PM »
   I don't see any way to address the etiquette without mentioning the legal ( laws vary check you local laws this is not legal advice).

Sidewalk can be public in the sense they have public right of way easements and not be public in the sense that the government owns them or maintains them.  So in those cases when I am by law required to provide the public with a path  through my properity(the size and materials  of which will be dictated by law) then I think it may be rude to do anything other then use it for its intended purpose of traveling on it.  So anyone can walk  bike ride/dog walk if its legal ect.  but that doesn't make it an appropriate place to stop and sunbath.