Author Topic: NaNoWriMo 2013  (Read 11439 times)

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AngelicGamer

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #45 on: October 09, 2013, 01:27:45 PM »
POD Yarnspinner.  It's nice to know that there's a support group here.  Yes, I have an online writing group, but... I dunno.  Seems like a lot less pressure here and more just welcoming.  Not that there's much pressure with the writing group - eh, I don't know what I'm saying in the end.  :)

Speaking of preparations, I'm being silly and looking into getting a tablet (Surface, actually) this year to write on.  I love my big block of a laptop, but I also want to get out more during NaNo - there's a very nice Dunkin Donuts up the block from me.  As well as it's just easier to get out with just a purse than a purse and a backpack.  Also, I might be more in a mood to edit.




"Life's tough, huh?  And then you die." ~ Buck, the Magnificent Seven.

PastryGoddess

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #46 on: October 09, 2013, 01:34:02 PM »
I write on my MacBook Air.  I loves it.  It's only a bit bigger than a tablet but still fits in my suitcase purse.  I use Scrivener, so I use dropox to keep my files and open them up on each computer.

cwm

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #47 on: October 09, 2013, 02:36:18 PM »
I have a MacBook Pro that I take everywhere with me. I can't stand using a tablet. Had to borrow one last year and I couldn't stand it. And yes, I know the Surface also comes with a keyboard that you can use, but I've also tried it and would just prefer my laptop.

I use Google Drive to keep everything up to date. I can write at home or at work and always have the latest version.

Last year we had several write-ins on the other side of the state line, but they weren't so far away as to be prohibitive. There were a lot at the big neardowntown library and several in coffee shops. There was even a big crawl day. Meet in one place, stay there for X hours, go to another, stay there for X hours, and so on. I think they hit four or five places. I dropped off after the third, but it was right by my house, so super easy to get home.

The hardest part I have is that when I write fiction, I also have supporting documents. My novel itself was about 50,200 words, but between the two files I had for different reference/supprting information, I had at least another few thousand words onto that. But they don't count because they're not part of the story. But when my story is set in a real place and a fictional place and I have to sort out college schedules, floor plans of various houses, family and friend webs with four main characters, and the entire setup of a brand new society, it gets wordy and I do need to look back to what I've said before. There's just no way around it.

AngelicGamer

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #48 on: October 09, 2013, 03:27:37 PM »
cwm - I call those plotness documents.  :)  Mine, at the moment, are the basic stats document and then my character sheets.  I have to get around to actually plotting - I use an idea that has 30 plot points and then try to do around 3K per plot point - but that's always fun. 

The 30 plot points, in case anybody wants to use it, is where you write a plot point per day to completion.  1 is your opening chapter and you go from there.  If you have a busy day, make your day one of the shorter plot points if you're a person that can jump around in your novel.  I'm not, so I cheat and write as much as a plot point as I can.  The next day, I finish up and also do the next plot point.  It's how I can end up with a 2K day one day and then anywhere from a 4K to 5K day the next.  Anywhere from 14 to 17 can be your first climax and then anywhere from 24 to 27 can be your second climax.  You kind of want to space them even - I usually have mine at 15 and 25 - but it's really up to the story.  :)

Just thought I'd share that with everyone.




"Life's tough, huh?  And then you die." ~ Buck, the Magnificent Seven.

PastryGoddess

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #49 on: October 09, 2013, 05:52:49 PM »
I have a MacBook Pro that I take everywhere with me. I can't stand using a tablet. Had to borrow one last year and I couldn't stand it. And yes, I know the Surface also comes with a keyboard that you can use, but I've also tried it and would just prefer my laptop.

I use Google Drive to keep everything up to date. I can write at home or at work and always have the latest version.

Last year we had several write-ins on the other side of the state line, but they weren't so far away as to be prohibitive. There were a lot at the big neardowntown library and several in coffee shops. There was even a big crawl day. Meet in one place, stay there for X hours, go to another, stay there for X hours, and so on. I think they hit four or five places. I dropped off after the third, but it was right by my house, so super easy to get home.

The hardest part I have is that when I write fiction, I also have supporting documents. My novel itself was about 50,200 words, but between the two files I had for different reference/supprting information, I had at least another few thousand words onto that. But they don't count because they're not part of the story. But when my story is set in a real place and a fictional place and I have to sort out college schedules, floor plans of various houses, family and friend webs with four main characters, and the entire setup of a brand new society, it gets wordy and I do need to look back to what I've said before. There's just no way around it.
cwm,

can I recommend Scrivener.  I also have lots and lots of supporting documents and I keep them all at hand in one file.  I love it because I can be writing along and when I need to go back and look up important information like names, geography, etc.  It's all in the same file.

eta:  There is always a 30 day free trial.  I think that they extended it for an extra couple of weeks for nano participants last year.  If you win it's 50% off so about $20.  If you don't win it's 20% off for a full year. http://www.literatureandlatte.com/trial.php
« Last Edit: October 09, 2013, 06:02:53 PM by PastryGoddess »

EllenS

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #50 on: October 09, 2013, 06:04:24 PM »
I"m about 35K into my first novel right now and I will jump out the window before I jump ship on it.  I've been writing an hour a day since April, and it is excruciatingly slow. But I think I will follow along and see if I can get inspired to add more time in November. On a fast day I can get about 875 words an hour, when i am really flying.  A slow day, maybe 350.

I was going to say on a "good" day or a "bad" day, but any day you write is a good day.

Sebastienne

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #51 on: October 09, 2013, 11:48:08 PM »
Okay, so I've been thinking about doing NaNoWriMo this year. I have a very vague idea for a novel, and I'm currently filling out a character sheet for the protagonist. But... I'd like to prepare more before I jump in. What advice do y'all have about getting ready?

I did register at the NaNoWriMo site, and I'm sebastienne there, too.


Nikko-chan

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #52 on: October 09, 2013, 11:56:54 PM »
Okay, so I've been thinking about doing NaNoWriMo this year. I have a very vague idea for a novel, and I'm currently filling out a character sheet for the protagonist. But... I'd like to prepare more before I jump in. What advice do y'all have about getting ready?

I did register at the NaNoWriMo site, and I'm sebastienne there, too.

That depends. are you a planner or a pantser? sounds like a planner, by the mention of a character sheet. So you have about 20 days/ write down the vague ideas now and add to it throughout this month. Every day do something different... create a charcter, work on a plot point etc, in those 20 days you should have a lot of it planned.

If you are a pantser however all you need is everything ranging from "a vague idea' to "somewhat planned in my head, with a few characters who are named. the rest will work itself out."

PastryGoddess

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #53 on: October 09, 2013, 11:59:13 PM »
Well are you a plotser or a pantser?  do you like having some kind of outline or are you ok with just jumping into writing?

I am a big fan of character development and I spend a lot of time thinking about who my characters are and what motivates them.  When I'm writing I need to be in their head, so having a very well fleshed out profile is helpful.

Put your ideas through the what if process. So basically take your vague ideas for your novel and just start asking what if.  What if the protaganist was... What if the plot did...  What if the bad guy did...  It's a great way to think about your plot in different ways and maybe get some new ideas.

Sebastienne

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #54 on: October 10, 2013, 12:12:58 AM »
It's scary taking on something this huge! Especially because I'm a strange combo of planner/pantser. If I've planned enough, I can write like a crazy person. If I plan too much, I get bogged down in "what's supposed to happen." So figuring out every plot point, or even a thorough outline, before I start is going to be terrible.

I guess, then, the key is figuring out my main characters, and then letting them do what they need to do, no?

Nikko-chan

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #55 on: October 10, 2013, 12:17:01 AM »
It's scary taking on something this huge! Especially because I'm a strange combo of planner/pantser. If I've planned enough, I can write like a crazy person. If I plan too much, I get bogged down in "what's supposed to happen." So figuring out every plot point, or even a thorough outline, before I start is going to be terrible.

I guess, then, the key is figuring out my main characters, and then letting them do what they need to do, no?

I myself am a pantser though i am more of a planner this year (we'll see how this goes)

What my pantsing self usually does is get charcters down, and a basic plot (paragraph or so) then when november comes, I just let crap happen!

PastryGoddess

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #56 on: October 10, 2013, 12:29:14 AM »
It's scary taking on something this huge! Especially because I'm a strange combo of planner/pantser. If I've planned enough, I can write like a crazy person. If I plan too much, I get bogged down in "what's supposed to happen." So figuring out every plot point, or even a thorough outline, before I start is going to be terrible.

I guess, then, the key is figuring out my main characters, and then letting them do what they need to do, no?

I am a bit more detailed, but what I do is I have an outline of what I want to happen and when.  Basically very broad strokes of the plot
So I will do:

  • meet female protaganist
  • meet bad guy
  • introduce plot
  • meet male protaganist
  • male and female meet
  • etc
  • etc
  • etc
So as I'm writing, I'm writing things in some semblance of order and I don't have to go back and fix timelines and such because I wrote things out of order.  I do want my books published so I make sure that I'm following a general plot outline. I follow the Blockbuster plot guide which is
Beginning 25%
   End of beginning  - which is where something happens that the protagonist has to react to
Middle 50%
    crisis happens somewhere towards the end of the middle.  this leads to the climax
End 25%
   climax and resolution


If I get stuck, I just move on to another part of the story.  I don't think about it.  I've found that moving on to another part of the plot will give me ideas to get through my writers block. 

Sebastienne

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #57 on: October 10, 2013, 12:38:46 AM »
I was a creative writing major in undergrad, but became an academic afterwards. I'm so used to academic writing, where it's like a logic puzzle--arguing from x to z, and making all connections seem obvious and sensible--that completely flying by the seat of my pants is a little scary. Crafting impeccable arguments is time-consuming, so how can you jump to another part of the plot without setting it up?!

This is obviously something I need to work on  :).

I've added everyone I could add; Yarnspinner, for some reason, didn't come up in search.

But I'm excited!

Nikko-chan

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #58 on: October 10, 2013, 12:49:26 AM »
I was a creative writing major in undergrad, but became an academic afterwards. I'm so used to academic writing, where it's like a logic puzzle--arguing from x to z, and making all connections seem obvious and sensible--that completely flying by the seat of my pants is a little scary. Crafting impeccable arguments is time-consuming, so how can you jump to another part of the plot without setting it up?!

This is obviously something I need to work on  :).

I've added everyone I could add; Yarnspinner, for some reason, didn't come up in search.

But I'm excited!


what is your screen name, so that i know it is you? (people add me and its not the same screen name as here so i get confused)

Sebastienne

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Re: NaNoWriMo 2013
« Reply #59 on: October 10, 2013, 12:52:35 AM »
Sebastienne. Like here. It seemed easier that way.