Author Topic: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating  (Read 6380 times)

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TootsNYC

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #30 on: November 03, 2013, 12:49:23 AM »

There's also the possibility of doing some sort of "ticket" system, but I can't really see that working too well.  If it's not a gated community, you can't block it off from visitors (unless maybe they lobby the police, but I see it as unlikely to work).  So the most you could do would be to have kids from the neighborhood have some sort of ticket or sign that they're from the neighborhood, and only give candy, or give the best candy, to those kids.  I think, though, that this would cause more problems than it would solve, because it would definitely anger the visitors and they've already shown themselves to be entitled and rather mean and nasty about it.



This is exactly the idea that's in another thread here, and people jumped all over that neighbor who announced this was what she wanted to do--presumably because she is overwhelmed also.

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #31 on: November 03, 2013, 01:14:19 AM »
Whatever the neighbors decide to do, they need to call the local media next October and explain what led to the decision. Too late to generate interest in the story this year.



MommyPenguin

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2013, 10:28:23 PM »

There's also the possibility of doing some sort of "ticket" system, but I can't really see that working too well.  If it's not a gated community, you can't block it off from visitors (unless maybe they lobby the police, but I see it as unlikely to work).  So the most you could do would be to have kids from the neighborhood have some sort of ticket or sign that they're from the neighborhood, and only give candy, or give the best candy, to those kids.  I think, though, that this would cause more problems than it would solve, because it would definitely anger the visitors and they've already shown themselves to be entitled and rather mean and nasty about it.



This is exactly the idea that's in another thread here, and people jumped all over that neighbor who announced this was what she wanted to do--presumably because she is overwhelmed also.

Yeah, sorry, I was mentioning this because of the other thread.  I don't so much see it as being ethically wrong, but I see it as being impractical, as I think it would just make things even more heated.

bopper

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #33 on: November 04, 2013, 09:24:11 AM »
I would contact the police and let them know of the issue.  Tell them that you plan to give out candy from 5-9 on Oct 31 only and are worried about people who come the day before.   I think I would also have a neighborhood meeting or something to set mutual rules. 
Also maybe you can contact the local paper and let them know of your plans.  Finally, make some signs and put them around the entrance to your neighborhood (like garage sale signs) stating the hours and days of ToTing.

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #34 on: November 04, 2013, 02:53:06 PM »
I am unfortunately one of the Pumpkin Rd ToTer's with my ONE grandson and we spent 30 minutes participating, after that he had more than enough candy and we were tired of being pushed around by the bigger kids.  I admire the Pumpkin Road residents !     

There are a lot of suggestions here I really liked - hiring off duty police, security guards, etc is a great idea.  Rope it off and collect money to cover them and pay for the candy.  Also roving neighborhood watchmen with flashlights and radios are good ideas.  Limit the hours also.  Then it becomes more like a street carnival and less like an entitled gimme grab.   

I would be thrilled to put in $5 to take my grandson down the street with all the decorations and have him trick or treat safely.  You don't have to make it so high it's "profitable" but really you all probably need some crowd control over there. 

I have a friend that also spent well over $100 on candy and she was worn out too.  The entitlement and rudeness is unbelievable these days but it continues to exist.  What I particularly hate is the pickups that drop off 20 kids and leave them there for hours... that's pretty risky and darned rude IMO. 

My DD lives in a rural area that just isn't ToT possible.   I live in an apartment complex way off the beaten path and everyone takes their kids somewhere else.  So this year I went along too.  Next year I am going to encourage the apartment residents to stay home and maybe all of building A go to building B, then on to C and D and then have A go home and BC&D come there.  Or maybe have 1/2 hour increments for each building to be accessible. 

Personally, I hate ToTing - I think it just gives parents an excuse to turn their children loose begging for candy.  I tried to talk DD into me just giving him a bag of mixed candies and watching a movie but she wanted him to have the experience so I went too.






blarg314

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #35 on: November 05, 2013, 08:44:48 PM »

Some kids live in areas where trick-or-treating isn't possible - apartment complexes and rural areas, for example. I don't think there's anything wrong with taking them a neighbourhood or two over for their ToTing - it will increase the numbers in that neighbourhood somewhat, but not over the top.

But here it sounds like the neighbourhood has become a destination event, which is totally different.

I would put a word of caution about turning it into an official event - roping off the neighbourhood and blocking traffic generally requires a city permit, and you may need appropriate permits to charge admission for an event on city property as well. You'll need to find a sponsor to cover the upfront costs (security guards, permits, buying tons candy because if it's a paid event you can't run out before the end of the stated time), or shell out the money as a neighbourhood hoping to recoup the costs.  You may need to arrange for appropriate parking for the event, or risk problems from surrounding neighbourhoods, and make arrangements for clean-up of city property at the end of the event.  And you'll need fairly unanimous agreement from the neighbourhood that this is a good idea, and a dedicated and competent committee to handle the organization and legal/financial stuff.


Sophia

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #36 on: November 06, 2013, 08:53:42 AM »
I've seen that done for destination Christmas Lights locations.  When it gets to be too nuts, they put up barricades and have someone with a bucket for money that goes to a stated charity. 

Thipu1

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #37 on: November 06, 2013, 11:02:33 AM »
There's a neighborhood in Brooklyn (Dyker heights) that has insane Christmas decorations.  There was even a PBS program about it (Dyker Lights). They bring in professional decorators and householders spend thousands of dollars. Obviously, the people who live there are very wealthy.

During the season, there are security guards on the edges of the area.  The only cars allowed are those owned by residents.

One year Mr. Thipu held up foot traffic while a resident got her car out of the driveway.  They had a little chat.  She agreed that yes, it was a hectic time but ,'It's only for a few weeks and it makes so many people happy'. 

 

catrunning

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #38 on: November 07, 2013, 12:34:44 PM »
This was the first year I did not hand out candy.   My neighborhood is also a destination and literally hundreds of kids are bussed in to Trick or Treat.   But so many of them were rude, and most were not in any sort of costume.  Many also acted like apprentice gang members.   I also spend hundreds of dollars on quality candy, not to mention decorations, just to be treated rudely when I wouldn't let them scoop up handfulls.   They would also destroy my decorations, probably in revenge for not getting the amount of candy they desired.    So this year, I decided to stop, along with quite a few of my neighbors.   It was just getting out of control. 

I turned out all the lights this year and "hid" in the back of my house.   But I still could not believe the banging on the door and continual ringing of the door bell when I didn't answer.   Some of them even went around to my side door and banged on it.   I shouldn't have to leave my house just to have some peace and quiet on Halloween.   The entitlement is unbelievable. 

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #39 on: November 07, 2013, 03:04:08 PM »
This was the first year I did not hand out candy.   My neighborhood is also a destination and literally hundreds of kids are bussed in to Trick or Treat.   But so many of them were rude, and most were not in any sort of costume.  Many also acted like apprentice gang members.   I also spend hundreds of dollars on quality candy, not to mention decorations, just to be treated rudely when I wouldn't let them scoop up handfulls.   They would also destroy my decorations, probably in revenge for not getting the amount of candy they desired.    So this year, I decided to stop, along with quite a few of my neighbors.   It was just getting out of control. 

I turned out all the lights this year and "hid" in the back of my house.   But I still could not believe the banging on the door and continual ringing of the door bell when I didn't answer.   Some of them even went around to my side door and banged on it.   I shouldn't have to leave my house just to have some peace and quiet on Halloween.   The entitlement is unbelievable.

Unfortunately it doesn't just stop or start with Halloween...it seems to be everywhere!

It has been several years ago when we ran out of candy and decided that enough was enough for Halloween and turned the porch lights off and we moved to the back of our house so that the entire front of our house was dark.   

Someone rang our doorbell about 20 times over and over and I finally went to the front door to see who could be so dense!  It was some teen without costume and he said, "it's about time."  And I replied, "we are out of candy.  Could you not figure this out?  The porch lights are off and the house is dark, are you an idiot or what?"  He just turned and stomped off - not my finest hour I know, but really!

I learned how to take the wire off the doorbell so it would not ring and that became a habit later in life.

   

Marisol

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2013, 07:47:55 AM »
Your stories make me feel a little bit better about living in a city where most kids trick or treat at the malls and other events.  We do get treaters in the streets, but in all the years I have lived here no one has rung our bell when the lights were off. And I've gone out with my friends kids and watched the process.  All the kids skip both non decorated houses and houses with lights off.  They don't even try.  Where I used to live the kids went to every house and gave the bell a ring even if the lights were off.

NyaChan

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #41 on: November 10, 2013, 01:53:39 PM »
I wish they'd only ring the bell - our lights were off outside but inside we weren't about to sit in darkness.  All but one group actually went for the door handle, roughly trying to open the door.  It was ridiculous.

jedikaiti

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Re: Overwhelmed Neighborhood - Trick or Treating
« Reply #42 on: November 10, 2013, 03:46:35 PM »
In our 3 years here, we only had 1 group try to ring the bell after we turned off the porch light. It was a group of older teens out late, and it seems nobody had ever told them that porch light out = no candy. I politely educated them, and sent them on their way.
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