Author Topic: Evangelising at a wedding  (Read 1987 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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Evangelising at a wedding
« on: October 08, 2013, 07:10:05 PM »
I understand that people object to the lifestyles of others, and can get quite vocal in their objections, but this about takes the cake.

http://baylyblog.com/blog/2013/10/strategy-christians-who-object-same-sex-weddings

Quote
Of course, I will provide my stuff for your wedding. I serve, and am required to serve, everyone, whether or not I approve of what he is doing. However, you do understand that if I am at your so-called 'wedding,' I will consider it my duty to call attention to God's view of what you are doing. I will consider it my obligation to warn the guests of the danger they are running and of the harm all of you are doing to your own lives as God observes them. So, I will be distributing literature that explains all this.

And I thank you for the opportunity to reach people who otherwise might never hear this message that I believe they desperately need to hear.

Now, I want to avoid religion in this as I see this as an etiquette thing. If anyone, from any religion or political persuasion were to do this they wouldn't get my business. I consider it far more rude than it refuse service.

What are they thinking? Do they think people would let them do this?

Sharnita

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2013, 07:16:37 PM »
I don't think they believe they will be allowed to do it. I think it is their syrayegy for opting out by making themselves so unpallatable the customer will choose somebody else.

NyaChan

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2013, 07:18:29 PM »
I don't think they believe they will be allowed to do it. I think it is their syrayegy for opting out by making themselves so unpallatable the customer will choose somebody else.

This.  They are trying to avoid the fate of that Canadian bakery.  Their beliefs won't allow them to service everyone equally, but turning people away will put them out of business or give them bad press. This way, they are claiming to be available, but making it so that no one would actually hire them.  I still think they'll get bad press though.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2013, 07:19:02 PM »
I don't think so, if you look at the comments you'll see how people think it's a good idea. And he's citing certain legal arguments, so I think he's serious.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2013, 07:21:27 PM by Katana_Geldar »

jmarvellous

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2013, 07:21:30 PM »
Firstly, there is NO way to avoid religion with a link like that. I honestly think you should put a disclaimer for offensive language in your subject line.

But if I may try: Of course they don't think they'll be "allowed" to distribute anti-marriage literature at a wedding. The post is deliberately inflammatory and entirely hypothetical.

I am 99.9999% sure there's no one who would hire a person who gave such a disclaimer to actually work at their wedding, and most people who received such an announcement would be sure all their friends knew the character of that business owner, as well.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2013, 07:23:04 PM »
I'm paying you for your service. Not your religion. Preach on your time, not mine.

This is also why Partner and I attended a wedding expo that was specifically for same-sex couples. That way we know our lovely lesbian money is going only to businesses who like our little LGBTQ community.

I would feel just as offended if I attended a wedding of Yankees fans and was accosted by someone telling me that I should cheer for the Red Socks and Yankees fans were bad. (an actual argument in my dived family)

But hey, if you'd rather spread hate and alienate a customer base with a disposable income...well, that's one way to run a business.

hobish

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2013, 07:23:30 PM »
I don't think so, if you look at the comments you'll see how people think it's a good idea.

I think that is because they are preaching to the choir. I can't get that particular post to load, but from what I can tell of that blog they only allow posts that agree with them and/or the only people that read it are people who already agree with their views.

((Am I allowed to say how proud I am of myself for leaving my views on the blog out of it? 'Cuz I've got plenty, lemme tell ya...))

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nuit93

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2013, 07:25:47 PM »
That wouldn't go over too well in the United States.  Pull a stunt like that ONCE, and you'll be remembered forever on Yelp, various blogs, etc.  Not to mention the potential for being sued...

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2013, 07:26:10 PM »
Firstly, there is NO way to avoid religion with a link like that. I honestly think you should put a disclaimer for offensive language in your subject line.

But if I may try: Of course they don't think they'll be "allowed" to distribute anti-marriage literature at a wedding. The post is deliberately inflammatory and entirely hypothetical.

I am 99.9999% sure there's no one who would hire a person who gave such a disclaimer to actually work at their wedding, and most people who received such an announcement would be sure all their friends knew the character of that business owner, as well.

If it was a political party that was going to be promoted at a wedding I'd feel the same way.

QueenfaninCA

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2013, 07:27:26 PM »
Happily married hetero here, but if I were in the position, I'd take my business elsewhere and make sure everyone I remotely know knows why I took my business elsewhere.

If they were the only option they'd get a leak-tight contract prohibiting them from speaking on the subject or distributing flyers etc. with very high penalties for breaking the contract.

Magnet

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2013, 07:34:50 PM »
Seriously??  In these economic times you would think a small florist/picture business would welcome any new business.  And how are these folks going to decide that its ok to take a gay man's flower business when its his auntie's funeral bouquet but not ok to take his business when its an "I'm sorry" bouquet to his boo.

Business is business.

If you find your customer to be so offensive, quote a high price and take yourself out the market.  But don't kid yourself.  You're not in "business." 
This is not an etiquette issue.  It's a stupid people issue.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2013, 07:45:53 PM »
Well, to a Christian, providing the flowers or cake for a same-sex marriage is like, say, giving alcohol to an alcoholic, or helping somebody who is cheating lie to his wife.  I realize that not everybody agrees with that, but that's why it's different than selling flowers to a gay man to give to his aunt... they aren't discriminating against the person, they are refusing to support the situation that they think is wrong.

And honestly, if Christians can be sued and forced to close their business for refusing to participate in something that goes against their faith, I see no reason why Christians can't say, well, fine, you can force me to do it, but I'll let people know what I believe when I do it.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2013, 07:48:34 PM »
Well, to a Christian, providing the flowers or cake for a same-sex marriage is like, say, giving alcohol to an alcoholic, or helping somebody who is cheating lie to his wife.  I realize that not everybody agrees with that, but that's why it's different than selling flowers to a gay man to give to his aunt... they aren't discriminating against the person, they are refusing to support the situation that they think is wrong.

And honestly, if Christians can be sued and forced to close their business for refusing to participate in something that goes against their faith, I see no reason why Christians can't say, well, fine, you can force me to do it, but I'll let people know what I believe when I do it.
What about if it was a race issue then? Say if he disagreed with purple and orange people marrying?

MommyPenguin

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2013, 07:56:34 PM »
There could be no reason to disagree with a purple and orange couple (man and woman) getting married *unless* it's about discrimination.  That's the only difference between a purple and orange couple and a couple of any other color, which is usually really based on a dislike of people of one of those skin colors.  It's not taking a stand against an act they think is morally wrong, it's taking a stance against people (since the only difference is skin color).  However, in the situation of a same-sex marriage couple, Christians (should) have nothing against either of the people, but it's the act itself, which they consider to violate the basic definition of marriage.  There's a good reason that Christians were active in the civil rights movement but not, generally, in the same-sex marriage movement.  There's a big difference between discriminating against people, and refusing to support an action.

MummySweet

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Re: Evangelising at a wedding
« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2013, 07:59:55 PM »
Speaking strictly of etiquette, the quoted material in the original OP is polite.   It may be distasteful to many people, but it is not impolite.    Etiquette does not require us to agree with everyone, nor does it require us to refrain from vocalizing our disagreement.  It requires that we be polite while doing so.