Author Topic: Beer and Cheese Dip  (Read 581 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

cwm

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2427
Beer and Cheese Dip
« on: October 22, 2013, 11:16:51 AM »
2 bricks cream cheese
1 packet Ranch seasoning
1/2 cup beer
2 cups grated cheddar cheese

Mix cream cheese, ranch, and beer until blended. Stir in cheddar cheese by hand.

I used spicy ranch, it gives the whole thing an orange tint and is still delicious. This dip works really well with pretzels, too.

ETA: I wasn't told what kind of beer. I used Miller Lite and it worked well, but I'd imagine any non-flavored beer would work. I'd hate to try apple beer, though. It may be good to drink, but I don't think it would cheese up well...

BigBadBetty

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 308
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2013, 01:06:49 PM »
Thank you! I think we still have a few bottles left of the semi-failed homebrew. It was drinkable but not very good. Always looking for more recipes to use up not-so-hot beer.

hobish

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 18187
  • Release the gelfling!
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2013, 01:25:25 PM »
Thank you! I think we still have a few bottles left of the semi-failed homebrew. It was drinkable but not very good. Always looking for more recipes to use up not-so-hot beer.

Hehehee! That is exactly what I was thinking. Iíve got a bunch of failed honey saisson that might be good for this or maybe bread. Lord knows it is not good for drinking. We were so excited about making it, and it is so sooo bad.
It's alright, man. I'm only bleeding, man. Stay hungry, stay free, and do the best you can.
~Gaslight Anthem

jpcher

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8768
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2013, 05:48:17 PM »
I'm curious (serious, not snarky) as to why a bad-tasting beer (when you drink it) would work better in a recipe? Do you think that the other ingredients will hide the bad taste?

I mean that when you're cooking with wine you are suppose to use a wine that you like to drink (or is that an old wives tale?)

flickan

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 192
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2013, 07:02:09 PM »
I'm curious (serious, not snarky) as to why a bad-tasting beer (when you drink it) would work better in a recipe? Do you think that the other ingredients will hide the bad taste?

I mean that when you're cooking with wine you are suppose to use a wine that you like to drink (or is that an old wives tale?)

The wine thing depends on who you talk to.  If I've got a bottle of red that has gone unfinished for two nights I will use it for vinegar in crock pot dishes for up to a month with a cork replacer in it (I keep it in the fridge, not trying to kill anyone)  Some people insist you only use good wine you would drink.  I feel I can taste the difference when I drink it but not when it's cooked in so I don't bother using good wine for cooking.  I imagine beer is much the same, though I don't cook with it often.

Lynnv

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2519
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2013, 07:33:30 PM »
I'm curious (serious, not snarky) as to why a bad-tasting beer (when you drink it) would work better in a recipe? Do you think that the other ingredients will hide the bad taste?

I presumed (perhaps incorrectly) that these were failed attempts at specific style of beer that didn't come out to the brewer's taste as opposed to beers that actively taste bad.  A failed honey saison that isn't to my taste may not be a bad beer-just a bad saison.

Back when I used to brew on a much more regular basis, I made a batch of brown that did not end well.  It didn't taste awful, but it sure wasn't to my taste.  And it was a horrible brown ale.  It ended up being more like a mediocre porter than a brown.  Great to cook with, but not something I wanted to drink by itself.  And I like porters (and browns).  It just wasn't a decent example of either.


I mean that when you're cooking with wine you are suppose to use a wine that you like to drink (or is that an old wives tale?)

I would not cook with something that I found undrinkable (cooking wine comes to mind).  But there are a lot of wines that aren't my favorites, but are fine to cook with IMO.  I know others disagree-but my rule of thumb is that I don't cook with any alcohol that is undrinkably bad.
Lynn

"Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat."  Robert A. Heinlein

BigBadBetty

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 308
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2013, 09:02:42 PM »
I'm curious (serious, not snarky) as to why a bad-tasting beer (when you drink it) would work better in a recipe? Do you think that the other ingredients will hide the bad taste?

I mean that when you're cooking with wine you are suppose to use a wine that you like to drink (or is that an old wives tale?)

The beer in question tastes like a bit like Miller Lite. Some people drink Miller Lite on purpose. We don't. However, it works fine to cook brats in. It makes decent beer bread. I would never cook with beer that was contaminated or something like that. The beer is recipes is small part of the flavor profile so using a less than favorite beer doesn't seem to matter.

cwm

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2427
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2013, 10:13:39 AM »
I'm curious (serious, not snarky) as to why a bad-tasting beer (when you drink it) would work better in a recipe? Do you think that the other ingredients will hide the bad taste?

I mean that when you're cooking with wine you are suppose to use a wine that you like to drink (or is that an old wives tale?)

Personally I don't drink most beers, I just don't like the flavor of them at all. But the flavor of a beer on its own versus beer used as an ingredient can be completely different.

My sister doesn't like several seasonings on their own or as the majority of a flavor profile, but she'll use them in combination with other things to alter the taste. It's the same principle, beer as an ingredient versus beer as standalone beverage.

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4165
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2013, 10:42:31 AM »
Unless the main ingredient of the dish is the wine, or unless you're just pouring the wine over something with no additional cooking, then I don't see anything with using a wine you weren't wild about drinking as a cooking ingredient. Same for beer. Once you cook it into the food, the flavor of the beer/wine melds in with the rest of the flavors and what you get is more the result of the alcoholic beverage's effect on the entire dish than the specific flavor of the wine or beer.

I purposely buy beer I wouldn't drink (read: cheap) for the purpose of cooking. I almost never bake chicken without first pouring a bottle of beer on top. It really enhances the moisture and flavor of the chicken.

I think the "don't cook with a wine you don't want to drink" advice is bogus. But yeah, many people subscribe to it. Just not me. Other than "cooking wine" which a PP mentioned. Yeah, that stuff is nasty. You're better off buying the cheapest bottle of any wine (3 buck chuck!) than a bottle of cooking wine. It's cheaper and it tastes better.

hobish

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 18187
  • Release the gelfling!
Re: Beer and Cheese Dip
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2013, 12:02:25 PM »
I'm curious (serious, not snarky) as to why a bad-tasting beer (when you drink it) would work better in a recipe? Do you think that the other ingredients will hide the bad taste?

I mean that when you're cooking with wine you are suppose to use a wine that you like to drink (or is that an old wives tale?)

The beer in question tastes like a bit like Miller Lite. Some people drink Miller Lite on purpose. We don't. However, it works fine to cook brats in. It makes decent beer bread. I would never cook with beer that was contaminated or something like that. The beer is recipes is small part of the flavor profile so using a less than favorite beer doesn't seem to matter.

For me, itís not so bad that I wouldnít cook with it, it just definitely is not honey saison. It should be a light refreshing summer beer, but instead itís heavy, with a lot of caramel taste and way too much coriander. Edible, just not drinkable. Like Betty said, it isnít spoiled or anything, it just failed for its purpose.
I also definitely cook with wine I wouldnít drink.
It's alright, man. I'm only bleeding, man. Stay hungry, stay free, and do the best you can.
~Gaslight Anthem