Author Topic: tipping 25%  (Read 5052 times)

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noydb

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tipping 25%
« on: October 14, 2013, 09:10:28 AM »
Just read this article http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/advice/2013/10/14/tipping-25-percent-restaurants/2976417/ .  Thoughts?  I dont know, I was a server for years, totally sympathize, but unlike most past servers, I have never given into the notion that I will tip extra good because I know what it is like.  My attitude has always been 'serve me well and I will tip you well, but a "well" tip is like 20%'.  Used to drive me nuts when fellow co-workers would tell a bus-boy 'sorry my tip out to you is small, I only got 15-18% tips tonite'.  That's normal, average, expected!!  My tips given to servers these days usually range from 10-25% (10 for buffets, 25 for rare super wonderful servers or those $8.00 bills and just leave a $10), with an average of 18-20%.  NOW this person is suggesting 25% as the norm?!!??  No.  Most servers make pretty good money, depending on market.  And over the years, food prices rise, they get raises then.  Do I think their hourly wage should be more?  yes, a bit more. 

It's good to be Queen

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2013, 09:42:42 AM »
No, sorry, not going to tip 25%.  I have raised my tipping to 18-20% over the last few years, but as restaurant prices keep going up, tips go up too so I don't see the need to increase the %.  The only place I tip more is a little diner my friends and I go to for breakfast often.  The whole meal costs $5 (including coffee) so I generally tip $2-3 because I can't bring myself to leave those great waitresses a $1 tip.

MrTango

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2013, 09:44:57 AM »
No, sorry, not going to tip 25%.  I have raised my tipping to 18-20% over the last few years, but as restaurant prices keep going up, tips go up too so I don't see the need to increase the %.  The only place I tip more is a little diner my friends and I go to for breakfast often.  The whole meal costs $5 (including coffee) so I generally tip $2-3 because I can't bring myself to leave those great waitresses a $1 tip.

I totally agree.

For a given meal that used to cost $20, a 15% tip would be $3.  If that same meal now costs $30, the same 15% tip is increased to $4.50.

Lynnv

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2013, 09:49:09 AM »
If I were Queen of the Universe (or even the High Minister of Tipping), servers would get paid a real wage and tipping would not be the issue it is.  <double checks business cards> Since neither of those titles appear on my business cards, I am stuck with tipping.  As such, I stick towards 15% (figure out 15% then round up) for regular good table service.  Closer to 10%ish for buffets/delivery.  Up to 25% for extraordinary service.  But that is usually places, like our local brewpub, where we get outstanding service on a regular basis.  The servers there really know us and take care of us (as does the manager), and we tip high in response.  I will resist the tip creep as long as I can without becoming the woman who tips a quarter because that was a good tip "back in the day."
Lynn

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TurtleDove

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2013, 09:55:55 AM »
I have no problem tipping 25% (I generally tip 20% or more).  I make good money - definitely more than my servers do - and I count the tip as part of the cost of going out.  When I was a server, it was not my "career" (it was during summers when I was in college and law school) but I appreciated being tipped well.  I "needed" the money but it was not my only source of income (I had scholarships, grants, and student loans as well).  I was never worried about whether I would be able to eat that week, but I know that it not the case for a lot of servers.

When I consider that other servers are in the position I was in (students trying to minimize loans and get a step up when they enter "the real world"), I want to tip them well.  And then I consider that for some people server is their career and only source of income and I want to tip them even better.  A few dollars more in a tip is immaterial to my bottom line (in fact, I factor it into my budget).  However, a few dollars more from each patron could mean a single mother is able to pay her rent *and* school clothes this month, for example.  I realize not everyone has the means to think this way, or the desire to think this way, but for me, I do not begrudge servers a few extra dollars out of my wallet.

tinkytinky

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2013, 10:02:11 AM »
the only reason I would go 25% on a tip is if the server goes above and beyond for me. The amount I tip has many variables. If the restaurant has a tip sharing policy (the servers pool the tips and split it equally, maybe including kitchen/clearing staff) I usually tip the 15-18%. If my server has be exceptional, I will maybe go to 20%, but I get the servers name so I can let management know of the great service. If the tips go directly to the server and I get exceptional service, I will go higher. Also the more complicated the dish to deliver, I will maybe give a little more (a chef salad is less to deal with than a hot plate of fajitas where the server could get burned, kwim?).

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Hmmmmm

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2013, 10:05:47 AM »
No, sorry, I will not pay a 25% gratuity. DH, DS and I went to dinner Saturday evening. Mid range restaurant for our city with most entrees between $12 & $18. We had 3 entrees and a shared appetizer. Our bill which included 2 iced teas, a soda and a margarita came to $75.  We were seated for less than an hour. A 25% tip would be $18.75. Our server was not dedicated to our table, she had at least 5 other tables. I feel the $15 we left was more than reasonable for the amount of time she spent taking our order, bringing our drinks, turning in our order, bringing our food and clearning our table.

Honestly, I wish if they aren't going to switch away from tipping that instead we go to a flat rate per person or per hour. I never could figure out why I should pay more for them to take and bring an order for a prime rib versus a burger.


auntmeegs

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2013, 10:08:12 AM »
I have no problem tipping 25% (I generally tip 20% or more).  I make good money - definitely more than my servers do - and I count the tip as part of the cost of going out.  When I was a server, it was not my "career" (it was during summers when I was in college and law school) but I appreciated being tipped well.  I "needed" the money but it was not my only source of income (I had scholarships, grants, and student loans as well).  I was never worried about whether I would be able to eat that week, but I know that it not the case for a lot of servers.

When I consider that other servers are in the position I was in (students trying to minimize loans and get a step up when they enter "the real world"), I want to tip them well.  And then I consider that for some people server is their career and only source of income and I want to tip them even better.  A few dollars more in a tip is immaterial to my bottom line (in fact, I factor it into my budget).  However, a few dollars more from each patron could mean a single mother is able to pay her rent *and* school clothes this month, for example.  I realize not everyone has the means to think this way, or the desire to think this way, but for me, I do not begrudge servers a few extra dollars out of my wallet.

POD, this is where I stand as well. 

Peppergirl

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2013, 10:10:24 AM »
I don't know.  It may not be a good reason for you, but having been a server in the past and now having the means to 'pay it forward' by tipping well, I do so.  I also consider it good karma. 

I do want to qualify the above statement by saying that I only tip well (above 20 percent) when the service is good, and I don't ever want to feel *obligated* to tip above 15 to 20.  It's just that I enjoy the feeling it gives me if the service warrants it.

I also was a pizza delivery girl back in the day, and I always tip the drivers extra well, because that's a tough gig too.  In return, they remember my address and I always get little extras, and my food arrives extraordinarily fast.  So, it benefits me too. :)


sweetonsno

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2013, 10:20:56 AM »
I think 25% is a bit much for average service. I personally tip 20% as my standard for your usual good service. Someone who does a great job gets more. Someone who is "meh" will get 15%, and someone who actually does a bad job gets 10% or less.

I don't quite buy the "tips go up as food prices go up" argument, though. I don't think food prices are going up fast enough to cover the increasing cost of living. As an example, entree prices in my favorite Vietnamese place have gone up a dollar in the three or four years that I've been going there. However, rents have increased by as much as $150 a month. That's quite a few more meals that the server needs to sell in order to not lose her home.

I think the amount one tips should be based not only on the quality of service and the price of your meal, but also on the situation in the state you live in. If I know I'm dining in a place where servers make below minimum wage, I'm probably going to increase my tip, especially if they're great. I'll also tip better if I've been parked at a table drinking a giant pot of tea for over an hour.

Redneck Gravy

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2013, 10:39:56 AM »
I live in west Texas,  right now the economy is booming and everything here is grossly overpriced (real estate & rents are over the top ridiculous). Unemployment is stated below 4% but truly is probably around 2% (that's right 2% unemployment - if you don't have a job it's because you really don't WANT one around here). 

Big box stores are starting employees with NO experience at $14 + per hour, wait staff is getting similar wages so restaurants can keep their doors open.  Waits at fancy restaurants are 2 hours or more on the weekend evenings.

Last year for Christmas Day a local chain brought in a team of workers at $12 per hour and paid their motel bill - one of them told me she made $200 that day in tips, plus her wages ($96) and got an overnight stay for a change.  I realize that is abnormal nationwide but it is not unusual for the area right now (the last two years and long term predictions). 

Tip 25% - not happening for me.  I think I tip above average at 20%.  Right now I am at 15% for very good service because I know what they are really making.  If the service is poor I will still throw 10% down or complain until I am satisfied.  There are several places in town I won't set foot in for awhile because they just don't have the labor force to accommodate evening & weekend crowds. 

So in summary of my long winded response - my tipping depends on the local economy also.   

123sandy

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2013, 10:51:49 AM »
25% is a really big tip! I wonder if the high tipping in the US is why other countries assume Americans are all rich? I live in Germany now and I've had servers follow me out of restaurants to hand back part of the tip.

I won't be tipping 25% and I don't like being told if I can't tip properly I should stay at home (by a server on a mommy site).

Hmmmmm

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2013, 10:58:05 AM »
I have no problem tipping 25% (I generally tip 20% or more).  I make good money - definitely more than my servers do - and I count the tip as part of the cost of going out.  When I was a server, it was not my "career" (it was during summers when I was in college and law school) but I appreciated being tipped well.  I "needed" the money but it was not my only source of income (I had scholarships, grants, and student loans as well).  I was never worried about whether I would be able to eat that week, but I know that it not the case for a lot of servers.

When I consider that other servers are in the position I was in (students trying to minimize loans and get a step up when they enter "the real world"), I want to tip them well.  And then I consider that for some people server is their career and only source of income and I want to tip them even better.  A few dollars more in a tip is immaterial to my bottom line (in fact, I factor it into my budget).  However, a few dollars more from each patron could mean a single mother is able to pay her rent *and* school clothes this month, for example.  I realize not everyone has the means to think this way, or the desire to think this way, but for me, I do not begrudge servers a few extra dollars out of my wallet.

But where does it end?  Everyone would like to receive a few extra dollars. My plumber would like to charge a few dollars more, my hairstylist would like to charge a few dollars more, my gardner would like a few dollars more too.

I'd much rather save my few dollars more and contribute more to charity than assume I know anything about the financial position of my server. I go in assuming that if they are willing to do the job then they are willing to accept the pay that the job is for. And in my community that mean an average of 18 to 20% for standard service.

rose red

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2013, 11:03:44 AM »
Honestly, I wish if they aren't going to switch away from tipping that instead we go to a flat rate per person or per hour. I never could figure out why I should pay more for them to take and bring an order for a prime rib versus a burger.

I always had a problem with this too.  What if a table of two order steak and lobster, but a table of ten order soup and salads?  You are working harder for the ten people, but get tipped less.

I use to tip around 25% or even more since "it's only a few bucks," but now that money is tight, I tip between 15-20%.  Tipping more was my choice, I don't think it's right to raise that to be the norm.

TurtleDove

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Re: tipping 25%
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2013, 11:11:03 AM »
But where does it end?  Everyone would like to receive a few extra dollars. My plumber would like to charge a few dollars more, my hairstylist would like to charge a few dollars more, my gardner would like a few dollars more too.

I posted what I personally believe.  You don't have to conduct your life in the same manner.  To answer your question, though, I am not saying the restaurants should charge more (which is what your comment seems to indicate).  I said I tip well in all tipping situations.  It isn't required, it is something I want to do becuase I think it is the right thing for me to do.  I can afford it.  I feel good about doing it.  For example, I tip my hairstylist 25-30% (she is also a personal friend of mine, and I know she is the sole breadwinner for her family of two young children and an injured husband, and she is also a full-time student). 

For servers, tips are a part of their overall compensation.  It is expected that they will be tipped.  It is not "required" and there is no way of predicting exactly how much they will be tipped on any given day, but tips are a major portion of their income.  This is not so for non-tipping jobs, like receptionist, or lawyer, or accountant, or cashier.  Sure, lots of people would take more money if offered to them.  The difference between a server and a non-tipped job is that the non-tipped job does not have the expectation of tips as part of their compensation.