Author Topic: Frequent Snopes-ing  (Read 4585 times)

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Arila

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2013, 07:25:56 PM »
I'm too busy to be this guy: http://xkcd.com/386/

Love that comic (specifically and generally). I used that on my husband one night a few months back too. :D

flickan

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2013, 08:19:38 PM »
I think it sounds like a waste of your own time, which is valuable so why bother continuing to send snopes links?  I completely understand the compulsion to do so, it's aggravating when people spread misinformation that's so obviously untrue via the internet, but that's part of being online.  You have to learn to discern what's worth looking into and what's bull and if other people cannot do it their loss.  The only time I get really wound up about this is when the whole "vaccines are the devil" schtick pops up and I have to run away from the internet.

I know you aren't one upping her but I feel it may come across that way if you do it repeatedly so I'd avoid it.  For your own sanity too.

This person sounds insufferable.

*inviteseller

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2013, 08:27:59 PM »
I have some very 'opinionated' relatives who post things of political nature that are so downright laughable, I almost think they are joking.  But these otherwise intelligent wonderful people are beleiving certain things so I have found myself Snopesing them.  I make no other comment other than to tell them to check Snopes for background on their article.  I try to only do it to the most outrageous things that are, IMO, dangerously false and misleading, but they do soldier on.  One relative went as far, when another relative very gently corrected some of the 'facts' stated in the article (he actually works for the place that was involved) and got blown up at for it, so I will be backing off.  You hate to see people you care about putting these things up and possibly looking silly for it, but sometimes you just have to sit back and let them have their opinions.

Allyson

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2013, 02:50:28 AM »
Gah...this is one of my major issues. I realize that you can't change people's minds, and Snopes-ing can come off as smug. However (and I realize this might come off as silly) I genuinely do feel a moral imperative to at least *try* to stop the spread of Internet misinformation. Even little-seeming things can have consequences when they become a belief everyone holds, which can happen really easily. Things spread really easily, and then someone just 'knows' something is true without knowing *how* they know it, and repeat it, etc etc...

I do try to contain myself, but I really wish there was some kind of mandatory Internet education class in schools where they'd teach everyone how to spot this type of thing.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2013, 02:59:39 AM »
Gah...this is one of my major issues. I realize that you can't change people's minds, and Snopes-ing can come off as smug. However (and I realize this might come off as silly) I genuinely do feel a moral imperative to at least *try* to stop the spread of Internet misinformation. Even little-seeming things can have consequences when they become a belief everyone holds, which can happen really easily. Things spread really easily, and then someone just 'knows' something is true without knowing *how* they know it, and repeat it, etc etc...

I do try to contain myself, but I really wish there was some kind of mandatory Internet education class in schools where they'd teach everyone how to spot this type of thing.

I think you do have a point, but I also see a big difference between believing Politician X is secretly a puppy-kicking communist (when the Facebook user in question wouldn't be voting for Politician X anyway) versus believing that, for example, breast cancer is best cured by prayer or that Bill Gates will donate $100 to orphans if you post a picture of your credit card number.  Some of the more ??? stuff on Facebook may be eye-roll-worthy, and some of it may theoretically hurt a specific celebrity or company by driving away fans/business, but that's not really in the same league as "medical advice which will actually harm you" or "encouraging other people to get taken in by scammers."

cwm

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2013, 10:14:38 AM »
OP you say you converse with her a lot on FB, but your feed is full of her "junk". You can block her from your feed and still have a lot of interactions on FB. You're still friends, you can still reply to her posts, she can still reply to yours, you'll still get notifications, and you can still message each other. The only thing that changes is she no longer shows up in your feed.

My sister does that off and on to various people during various times of the year. Actually, she had blocked her boyfriend from her feed and didn't notice for more than a month because of how much they already comment on each other's posts.

Layla Miller

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2013, 11:55:55 AM »
I think there's also a difference when it comes to frequency of posting false information.  If someone on your friends list is constantly posting untrue stuff, then it's unlikely that Snopes or anything else will stop the flood.  If, however, an otherwise level-headed friend is taken in by a myth then I would gently point it out.  Most of my FB friends are the latter--once my SIL reposted the "FB is going to start charging!" myth and I replied with something like "Don't worry; it's not true!" with a link.  My best friend shared that fake video of an eagle carrying off a toddler and seemed genuinely concerned, so I did the same for her.

For me, a lot has to do with the person posting and their angle.  If they seem truly worried about what they're posting (which was the case in both of my examples above) then I actually consider it a kindness to link them to Snopes or similar.

TL;DR: Know your audience and adjust your approach accordingly.  :)
I searched for nothing on the Internet and got 175,000,000 hits.

MissRose

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2013, 08:03:53 AM »
Makes me glad that my mother does not have Facebook nor knows how to use a computer.  She would probably post every weight loss related item on my wall as an example, and accepts like a gospel things like Doctor Oz, The Doctors, etc have to say on tv or other forms of media.

sweetonsno

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2013, 01:23:26 AM »
I think you can change what updates you get from a person. If you select "only important," you won't see the shares. I imagine that most of her nutty things are shares.

I wouldn't correct unless there's some sort of danger, like a suggestion that you mix bleach and ammonia to make an extra-strong cleaner.

blarg314

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2013, 05:29:50 AM »

For the Snopesing and repeated offenders I would pick my battles. I would ignore anything except posts where following the instructions would result in danger to the reader or bystanders, in which case I will post a public correction with links.

So if someone posts about how you should throw flour on a grease fire to put it out, I will correct that publicly. If they're posting that water heated in the microwave is harmful to plants, I'll ignore it because believing it isn't going to hurt someone.

Cherry91

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #25 on: October 18, 2013, 05:55:58 AM »
My general approach depends on how close I am to the person and how they've reacted to what they've posted - eg, if they're quite upset, I'm more than happy to tell them it's not real, but if they're happy about false info I might try to find a gentler way to break it to them.

wyliefool

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Re: Frequent Snopes-ing
« Reply #26 on: October 25, 2013, 12:06:03 PM »
Gah...this is one of my major issues. I realize that you can't change people's minds, and Snopes-ing can come off as smug. However (and I realize this might come off as silly) I genuinely do feel a moral imperative to at least *try* to stop the spread of Internet misinformation. Even little-seeming things can have consequences when they become a belief everyone holds, which can happen really easily. Things spread really easily, and then someone just 'knows' something is true without knowing *how* they know it, and repeat it, etc etc...

I do try to contain myself, but I really wish there was some kind of mandatory Internet education class in schools where they'd teach everyone how to spot this type of thing.

I think you do have a point, but I also see a big difference between believing Politician X is secretly a puppy-kicking communist (when the Facebook user in question wouldn't be voting for Politician X anyway) versus believing that, for example, breast cancer is best cured by prayer or that Bill Gates will donate $100 to orphans if you post a picture of your credit card number.  Some of the more ??? stuff on Facebook may be eye-roll-worthy, and some of it may theoretically hurt a specific celebrity or company by driving away fans/business, but that's not really in the same league as "medical advice which will actually harm you" or "encouraging other people to get taken in by scammers."

What I've decided to do is in cases like this if it's really bugging me I go to the company/celebrity's website, find 'contact us', and send them the link w/ a note like 'I don't know if you're aware of your [brand] being used in this way. I assume this is fake, in which case you might want to look into it. I would be disappointed to learn that you support [whatever].' Ex: Dr Oz is actually suing a bunch of Facebook spammers who've been using his name and photo for fake weightloss stuff.

Most things don't rise to the level of my caring to bother, but when they do, at least I feel like something might be done about it rather than me getting pointlessly mad on facebook.