Author Topic: when do you leave?  (Read 6955 times)

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rain

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when do you leave?
« on: October 15, 2013, 10:26:52 PM »
I'd like my job except for a few minor things (those I could deal with) and one major thing -

When do you know its time to leave?
"oh we thank thee lord for the things we need, like the wind and the rain and the apple seed"

TurtleDove

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2013, 10:30:30 PM »
When you have another job.

mrs_deb

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2013, 10:35:53 PM »
When you start crying when you wake up in the morning.

PastryGoddess

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2013, 10:52:29 PM »
When all you can think about is leaving before you even get in the door. 

EllenS

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2013, 11:17:22 PM »
When you have another job.

POD

Or, of course, a year's worth of living expenses in savings.
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dirtyweasel

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2013, 04:50:05 AM »
When you have a panic attack just thinking about going to work.

When your work-related stress starts affecting your physical health.

You're consistently unhappy, stressed, depressed and angry at work.

When your unhappiness and stress with your job starts affecting your personal life.



heyyoume

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2013, 05:18:33 AM »
When you're asking when you should leave it's time to start looking for another role.   At the point when you know you have to go, it's great to have another job lined up.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2013, 08:53:42 AM »
I was very stressed in my old job.  Loved the work, loved the people I worked with, couldn't stand my supervisor.  Micromanager to the extreme and took credit for work I'd done.

I made the decision I was leaving.  I started looking for another job immediately, applying for all sorts of things all over the province.  I was *this close* to quitting and working a retail job of some sort - I had some cake decorating skills to fall back on.  Not good enough for a bakery, probably, but certainly good enough for a grocery store bakery.

But I held on and won a job in a different area at the same employer.  And less than a year later, left for the job I currently have.  And will be staying until I retire in 11 years.

So my advice is:  if you can manage, stay where you are while you look for something else.  Start saving as much as you can.  If things get really bad, leave and use your savings or find a stop gap while you keep job searching.
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Betelnut

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2013, 09:08:50 AM »
I agree that you leave when you can afford it (new job already or lots of $$$ in the bank) but I think the key to the OP's question is, "When do you know that it is time to start looking for that new position?"

For me, it was when I realized that the job I had (as wonderful as it was) wasn't advancing my career, didn't have a way to move up and was kind of boring me.  I was spending WAY too much time playing Free Cell at work. 

My mother left a job that she had had for years because her new supervisor was a complete and total b&tch.  Time to start looking for a new job at that point!
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cattlekid

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2013, 09:21:57 AM »
I knew it was time to leave my first job after college when I started dreaming about work for eight hours a night and waking up exhausted knowing that I would have to face another eight hours of actual work.

Zilla

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2013, 09:23:46 AM »
Before any of the above starts. (the stress, crying, thoughts of leaving etc)


You already know about the major things and minor things. Start applying now. 

Syfygeek

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2013, 10:45:05 AM »
At my last job, the rule was if the President made you cry everyday for a week, it was time to go.

I found this job and left. (and my boss makes me crazy, but he's never made me cry 2 days in a row, much less 5)

3 members of the accounting department quit over the next 3 months, with 12, 14 & 22 years at the company, all for the 5 day rule. It was so bad, the HR person called in on a Monday and quit.

Good luck Rain!
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Lady Snowdon

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2013, 10:56:33 AM »
For me, it was time to quit when I was crying after work, and the stress was affecting my personal life.  I tried job searching while at that job, but it wasn't working.  My boss was getting suspicious about so many appointments and personal days requested suddenly.  It was just better all around for me to quit and job search full time (which I've been doing for two weeks now - and I've already had some interviews!  YAY!).  Being unemployed, while boring (since we can't afford to do anything outside of our budget) has been so much better for my health and outlook on life!

veronaz

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2013, 11:04:14 AM »
Quote
At my last job, the rule was if the President made you cry everyday for a week, it was time to go.

I found this job and left. (and my boss makes me crazy, but he's never made me cry 2 days in a row, much less 5)

Syfygeek, how did he "make you cry", and did the rule apply to both men and women?  I see references to crying, but I don't think that crying - in and of itself - is necessarily an indicator of when to leave a job.  If someone is crying a lot, there may be other personal/emotional factors involved.

OP, I think it's hard to advise you without knowing more about what the problems are and what efforts you've made to resolve them.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 11:11:00 AM by veronaz »

mspallaton

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Re: when do you leave?
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2013, 12:23:22 PM »
I'd like my job except for a few minor things (those I could deal with) and one major thing -

When do you know its time to leave?

Other posters have given some good advice - but I wanted to chime in with some great advice that has helped me a lot so far. 

- Don't ever close your eyes to new opportunities -- if you don't know any headhunters or recruiters in your field, start building those contacts.  Sometimes it isn't time to leave a job because that job is bad, but because another opportunity is just so much better.

- Try to interview at least once every year to two years.  That keeps you 'in the market' - recruiters and headhunters will be more likely to contact you if they know you're open for interviews and they will pass your name along to each other.

- It is time to leave when you start thinking about leaving.  A job shouldn't have to be a terrible nightmare before you decide to move on.  If you're thinking "gosh, maybe I'm ready to try something new" - that's all you need.

- You don't owe your boss or coworkers any debt of loyalty that prevents you from realizing your career goals.  Don't be a [non-eHell approved word] about things, obviously -- but you should feel no obligation to stay in a job that isn't fulfilling because of the people around you.  Add them on Facebook or LinkedIn (depending on the relationships) and keep in touch.  Who knows - you may help them find a new career that they love at some point by keeping in contact with one another.