Author Topic: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?  (Read 5785 times)

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Millionaire Maria

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #45 on: October 27, 2013, 07:39:35 PM »
Another issue is noise and light.  I'm expected to be at work on Nov 1.  If your display makes so much noise and/or is so bright that I can't sleep before midnight your display is tacky.  That applies to Christmas decorations, too.  Please turn everything down or off by 10pm.  Also, if people looking at your display block my access to my home your display is rude.
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No, that makes the people blocking access to your home rude.
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Niamh84

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #46 on: October 31, 2013, 10:44:29 AM »
Today, it seems as though we are living in extremes. An entire class is forbidden to have a Halloween party because of one child with a religion who doesn't partake. I fully believe extremes like that only ostracize the child of a different religion, since every child in that class will blame him/her for not being allowed to have the party.


That doesn't even make any sense though.  Halloween isn't a religious holiday so how could someone's religion prevent the class from having a halloween party?

Sharnita

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #47 on: October 31, 2013, 10:51:20 AM »
Today, it seems as though we are living in extremes. An entire class is forbidden to have a Halloween party because of one child with a religion who doesn't partake. I fully believe extremes like that only ostracize the child of a different religion, since every child in that class will blame him/her for not being allowed to have the party.


That doesn't even make any sense though.  Halloween isn't a religious holiday so how could someone's religion prevent the class from having a halloween party?

There are some religions where birthday parties are a violation of the faith's tenants.  We don't have to agree with the reasoning to acknowledge it does violate some beliefs.

flickan

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #48 on: October 31, 2013, 11:07:55 AM »
Today, it seems as though we are living in extremes. An entire class is forbidden to have a Halloween party because of one child with a religion who doesn't partake. I fully believe extremes like that only ostracize the child of a different religion, since every child in that class will blame him/her for not being allowed to have the party.


That doesn't even make any sense though.  Halloween isn't a religious holiday so how could someone's religion prevent the class from having a halloween party?

Much like Christmas, Halloween has both secular and religious significance.  Depending on what faith you practice Halloween could be part of a sacred tradition or the exact opposite, as it was in my family growing up, where the celebration of All Hallows Eve was forbidden because of it's perceived association with the occult.  Though we were never forbidden to attend Halloween activities at school.  This was decades ago when people were less concerned about that.  For me, now, it has religious significance as the eve of All Saint's Day, which is a holy day of obligation.

It's definitely in that "gray area" of religious signficance.

Idlewildstudios

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #49 on: October 31, 2013, 11:48:28 AM »
For some, ( very condensed version) it is celebrated as Samhaine, a time where the veils between the world if the living and the deceased are thinned.  For those that celebrate, an extra place setting us often put at the table and deceased loved ones are invited to basically come and fine and visit the family. Bonfires were lit at sunset and people danced around them in costume to celebrate the harvest and ask for blessings for the coming year.

That is probably where the traditions of ghosts and possibly zombies figure in to Halloween celebrations.

violinp

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #50 on: October 31, 2013, 11:56:54 AM »
Today, it seems as though we are living in extremes. An entire class is forbidden to have a Halloween party because of one child with a religion who doesn't partake. I fully believe extremes like that only ostracize the child of a different religion, since every child in that class will blame him/her for not being allowed to have the party.


That doesn't even make any sense though.  Halloween isn't a religious holiday so how could someone's religion prevent the class from having a halloween party?

They could believe that Halloween is evil to celebrate. I had several classmates for whom that was the case. I believe in the same religion, but we're different denominations, and so my beliefs are most certainly not theirs.
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Another Sarah

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #51 on: October 31, 2013, 12:14:34 PM »
Today, it seems as though we are living in extremes. An entire class is forbidden to have a Halloween party because of one child with a religion who doesn't partake. I fully believe extremes like that only ostracize the child of a different religion, since every child in that class will blame him/her for not being allowed to have the party.


That doesn't even make any sense though.  Halloween isn't a religious holiday so how could someone's religion prevent the class from having a halloween party?

Halloween has religious roots going back centuries. The name Hallowe'en is a bowdlerised version of All Hallow's Eve - All Hallows Day is an alternative name for All Saints Day. The Day after all saints is All Souls Day, which is supposed to be dedicated to those who have passed away - trick or treating and pumpkin lanterns (originally turnips in the UK) both come from the tradition of giving out soul cakes.

It does share a date with the older holiday of Samhain, but all the religious days in the Christian calendar (including Christmas and Easter) are dated around the same time as older pagan holidays - the dates were changed deliberately to wipe out the older religions associated with those times of year. In the 9th century the date of all Saints day was shifted to coincide with Samhain. Didn't entirely work though, as a lot of the old traditions remain, but it is definitely a religious holiday whether you're christian and celebrate all hallows or pagan and celebrate samhain.

MamaMootz

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #52 on: November 04, 2013, 12:05:49 PM »
I do have to chime in on this topic because I am one of those people who adores celebrating Halloween.

We are renting a townhome, and I put up a door cover, spider webs, and some homemade mummy lights - along with some ghosties on our garage door and some light up spiders in the windows. On Halloween night, I had a small haunted house in our one car garage, and participation was optional for the neighborhood kids. I was dressed up and handing out witch's finger cookies to the parents and candy to the kids - regardless of whether or not they went into the haunted house.

Most of the kids LOVED it. But I had one parent who had an issue with me - she came up to me with her two youngish kids (I'm thinking 5 and maybe 7) and was P/A about the decorations. My next door neighbor was out front with me, and we were chatting and my next door neighbor mentioned how fun it was that I was so into Halloween and the kids were getting a big kick out of it... when ParentMom chimed in and said, "Well, we live in the townhome behind this one and we were forced to watch it get put up. Good thing my kids are OK with this."

Um............  :o

I didn't have any bloody heads/body parts/what have you on display, and honestly, spider webs and ghosties are too much?

I just smiled and turned away 'cause I had no reply.
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magicdomino

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Re: can halloween decorations be considered "rude"?
« Reply #53 on: November 04, 2013, 12:22:07 PM »
There's always a party pooper, isn't there?   ;)

Having said that, I have been wondering about my pre-Halloween set-up, specifically the skull fence.  This photo is from a couple of years ago, but the skulls and stakes are the same:



This year, they were closer to the road.  Because I'm paranoid about weather and vandals, the skulls didn't get stuck on the stakes until Sunday the 27th.  I didn't hear any complaints or see any freaked-out toddlers, but that doesn't mean anything.