Author Topic: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..  (Read 2466 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..
« Reply #105 on: September 24, 2014, 05:22:56 PM »
I'm in Ontario, Canada.  When I took my license many years ago, there was no requirement for a driver's ed course.  But if we did take it, we got a huge cut in insurance costs once we had a license.  It comprised both classroom and behind the wheel driving practice.  All the driver's ed cars were automatic, even back in the 80's.  For the most part, my Dad taught me to drive because all we had were manuals.  My Mom also tried to teach me to drive.  Yeah, that didn't go so well.

We got a learner's permit, called a 365 because it was good for a year.  You had to have a licensed driver in the car with you anytime you were driving.  But there was no indication on the outside of the vehicle that the person behind the wheel was a newbie unless you were driving the driver's ed car.  Once you (and your parents) felt you were ready to take your test, you'd make an appointment to take your test.  It was quite involved and included driving around town, parallel parking, on a hill if possible, backing into a parking space, etc.  Those in the city had it tougher because they'd have to show they could get on and off the highway properly.

I'm not sure how it all works now with the graduated system but I do think it is tougher now.  But there is still no differentiation in the license as to whether you can drive an automatic or a manual vehicle.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

perpetua

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Re: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..
« Reply #106 on: September 24, 2014, 05:23:44 PM »
Americans use qualified instructors just as they do in the UK. But just like a manual is your default, ours is an automatic. So people learn how to drive in an automatic. It's not some derelict system where we hand out licenses to anyone who asks and wish them luck.

That isn't what i said. But the system does allow people who have no experience or clue how to operate a manual car to just get in it and drive it, on a public road, in traffic, putting themselves and other road users at risk because they don't know how to control the vehicle, so in that respect, it's a bit on the strange side, surely.

It has been discussed on this forum before, during which it was ascertained that many Americans learn to drive from their parents. Any amount of googling will also turn up that same answer. That just isn't the case here.

The way we learn to drive here is different. That's just a fact.  "Drivers Ed", as it has been described countless times on this forum, is *not* the same, or as thorough, as our system of practical tuition with an instructor and our driving tests are also harder to pass and seem to cover more eventualities. Driver's Ed has been described as a class you take to prepare yourself for getting a learner's permit, after which you then learn with your parents. We don't do that here. We get our provisional licences first, which allows us to drive with an instructor. Then we have our driving lessons with a qualified instructor, then we take the test.

Different.
You can read as many articles you want, but as an American who holds a drivers license, you are wrong. We have to log hours with a qualified instructor just as you do. Our parents help, but you have to drive with a qualified instructor before you're allowed to take the test.

And as a Brit who holds a British driving licence and has done for 26 years and who sat the far more stringent British driving test, you are also wrong about our system, so let's just agree to differ, shall we? Furthermore, my information of drivers ed in the States has come direct from this forum, from other Americans. Like I said, perhaps it varies from state to state - not many things seem to be countrywide over there, so that would make sense.
Unlike you, I don't pretend to know anything about your system. You said you log hours before a test, I said we do the same. But your insistence that our system is inferior based upon your internet research and from reading stories is very insulting.

I didn't say it was inferior. I said it was different. Please do not attribute things to me that I did not say. I also said our driving test was very stringent, because it is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_driving_test

I also said that most of my information on this subject had come from here, from this very website. This subject has come up before. So perhaps you can take that up with your fellow Americans who are giving out that information.

BigBadBetty

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Re: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..
« Reply #107 on: September 24, 2014, 05:25:59 PM »
Different states in the U.S. have different standards. That is why people have different stories. There are also generally different rules for adults and those under 18. I had to take classroom instruction to get my learner's permit. I had to have my learner's permit to take lessons from a instructor. The instructor had to sign off on a form saying I had the minimum number of hours behind the wheel. I had to take that form to my driving test at the Department of Motor Vehicles. My parents supplemented my driving lessons. 25 years ago when I was learning, high schools generally offered classroom and behind the wheel training. Now most kids have to go to a private driving school. I had to go to a private driving school because the high school's schedule didn't work with mine.

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..
« Reply #108 on: September 24, 2014, 05:32:25 PM »
In driver's ed, there were huge Student Driver signs on the car. :) That doesn't apply, though, to if you're learning on your own time in your mom's car or something.

Seriously? There is nothing that tells other road users 'the person in front has never sat behind the wheel before'?

Well, except in a specific set of circumstances, it's illegal. If a kid is, say, 15, and mom is teaching her to drive, then she's supposed to have a permit that says she can only drive if a parent is in the car, until she's passed certain other hoops. It's not as foolproof as the parent having an extra brake like the driver's ed cars do, but the kid can't just go drive without supervision. I mean, she can, but it's against the law. But no, private citizens don't normally have a "student driver" sign.

Technically, I'm pretty sure it's even illegal for an unlicensed/unpermit'd person to be practicing in an empty parking lot, but it's kind of generally accepted that it's better than the alternative.

Sorry, that isn't what I meant. Here, you can't so much as get behind the wheel unless you have a provisional licence - from the sound of it, that's much the same as the permit you mention. You can't go out alone, you have to have someone with you who is over 21, who has a licence to drive the sort of car you're driving (so someone who only has a licence for an automatic can't teach you or help you practice in a manual) and who has had a full licence for 3 years. You don't have to have formal paid lessons although they're recommended, and you can't accept money for giving lessons unless you're a qualified instructor.

Then you put L plates up. They are removable square signs with a large red L (or you can have D in Wales, and somebody will be able to tell us what that stands for  :D ) and you display one in front and one on the rear. That tells other road users that you're an idiot a novice. You must display L plates until you pass your test and get your full licence. Driving instructors are permitted to keep them on permanent display, and most of them incorporate them into a bigger sign for 'Learn to drive with Hippy Chick's Driving SchooL' or something similar. The rest of us are supposed to take them out of the car when the Younger Chick isn't driving.

QueenfaninCA

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Re: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..
« Reply #109 on: September 24, 2014, 05:36:53 PM »
European here who moved to California. Despite having a driver's license from my home country, I had to get a California driver's license from scratch (some states just give you theirs if you show the driver's license from home country).

Here is what I had to do in California: Pass the written test at the DMV. That got me my learner's permit. I was now allowed to practice driving a car provided an adult with a valid California Diver's license was in the passenger seat. Get an appointment for the driving test (this took a while because it required a SS number which took a few weeks to get). Pass the driving test. Nowhere in this whole process was a professional instructor involved or required.

The driving test took about 20 minutes and involved mostly driving around city street and a U-turn on an extremely wide residential street. I took it on an automatic but was now allowed to drive manuals as well.

Back in home country I had to take theory classes from a trained instructor, around 30 hours of driving with the instructor including two hours in the darkness, some free-way driving, city traffic, a 3-hour class driving longer-distance on highways,... All on a manual. If I had used an automatic, my license would have restricted me to only automatic cars.

perpetua

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Re: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..
« Reply #110 on: September 24, 2014, 05:38:09 PM »

Then you put L plates up. They are removable square signs with a large red L (or you can have D in Wales, and somebody will be able to tell us what that stands for  :D ) and you display one in front and one on the rear. That tells other road users that you're an idiot a novice. You must display L plates until you pass your test and get your full licence. Driving instructors are permitted to keep them on permanent display, and most of them incorporate them into a bigger sign for 'Learn to drive with Hippy Chick's Driving SchooL' or something similar. The rest of us are supposed to take them out of the car when the Younger Chick isn't driving.

Yep, like this:



They're to inform other road users that you're a learner and are likely to do something unpredictable.

When you pass your test, you can switch to plates with a green P on them, which informs other road users that you're a newly qualified driver. They're not compulsory in the same way that L plates are though.


 

Wordgeek

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Re: Tell me of stick shifts and not panicking..
« Reply #111 on: September 24, 2014, 05:43:51 PM »
Locked.  Talk to a driving instructor, in real life.