Author Topic: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)  (Read 2474 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

ladyknight1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8357
  • Operating the logic hammer since 1987.
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #15 on: Yesterday at 11:56:26 AM »
We have a graphic designer on staff and she is very busy. My boss got the Happy Holidays graphic for this year from her and had a conniption because it was in portrait, not landscape.

Boss never requested it in landscape.

Boss complained that it was too large, so I resized it. Boss complained that she had to scroll in an email to see the whole image. Boss had her email on 125% of the actual size. Sigh.

akm10

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 66
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #16 on: Yesterday at 12:13:28 PM »
The current mascot of our Project Team:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg

LazyDaisy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1072
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #17 on: Yesterday at 01:41:39 PM »
I do have a classic example of the belief that 'anyone can do it'. I'm not a designer, but because a client asked I spent the best part of 8 hours over a couple of days, with client feedback, on photo layout for promotional materials, kept it simple, clean fonts, and so on. I thought this was a fast turnaround, but the client did not. They said they could do it better for the next run in-house, because feedback and photo changes was far too much work and they had a volunteer with a computer.  The result was one page of text. No pictures, five colours for emphasis, (and because pale yellow text should always be used on a white background), a system font in about seven random sizes, etc. To save costs they printed it greyscale, so I only discovered the funky colors when I saw it online.

There is a happy ending. Mine got a 10% response rate. Theirs didn't - and that's not 'didn't get 10%', that's 'didn't have a response rate' so I've been asked back to design their next campaign.

Re the bolded: I used to work at a translation agency. Can't tell you how many times we'd send a client a translation, which had been translated and edited and proofed by three different native speakers of that language, and the client would call up and say, "We have an employee here who speaks that language and they say your translation is wrong."

Many people in the US speak other languages, but they haven't necessarily *learned* the language, as in had a single class on proper grammar, syntax, etc. Learning a language only by hearing other people speak it does not necessarily mean that you are an expert in that language. (Just look at some of the "English" on social media sites for examples.) Just as anyone can adjust a font on a brochure, but it takes training to put together a nice-looking brochure, anyone can learn to speak a language, but there's a reason there are college degrees in translation.

Or the employee might speak a regional variant of that language, and not the standard. French is spoken in France, in Canada and in many African countries. Spanish is spoken in Spain, many South American countries, the US (with Mexican and Puerto Rican variants) and other places. English is spoken in the UK, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Australian, Canada, the US, and many other places.

And telling us that your employee says that "November" is not correctly spelled isn't going to get  us to change the spelling. We checked our dictionaries. We don't know where your employee learned to spell.

I have learned to fear the phrase, "We have someone in-house who . . . ." It never ends well.
A graphic design challenge related to translations...

I am working on a flyer that is English on the front and Spanish on the back. It has been my experience that Spanish translations are longer/more words so I have to adjust the layout a bit. It never fails that people comment that the Spanish side font looks like a different point size/condensed/longer, etc. than the English side. Yes, yes it does. There is very little I can do about that.
"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools." — Douglas Adams

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5215
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #18 on: Yesterday at 02:45:52 PM »
I volunteer my services as a photographer for various non-profits this time of year.  My stated turn around time is 5 business days to get final images to the organization.  This is due to the post processing that needs to happen to make sure the images look good. 

Yet, without fail I get emails demanding to know why the photos aren't available for download the very next day.  And how dare I put a watermark on those pictures. 


camlan

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8781
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #19 on: Yesterday at 03:40:19 PM »
I do have a classic example of the belief that 'anyone can do it'. I'm not a designer, but because a client asked I spent the best part of 8 hours over a couple of days, with client feedback, on photo layout for promotional materials, kept it simple, clean fonts, and so on. I thought this was a fast turnaround, but the client did not. They said they could do it better for the next run in-house, because feedback and photo changes was far too much work and they had a volunteer with a computer.  The result was one page of text. No pictures, five colours for emphasis, (and because pale yellow text should always be used on a white background), a system font in about seven random sizes, etc. To save costs they printed it greyscale, so I only discovered the funky colors when I saw it online.

There is a happy ending. Mine got a 10% response rate. Theirs didn't - and that's not 'didn't get 10%', that's 'didn't have a response rate' so I've been asked back to design their next campaign.

Re the bolded: I used to work at a translation agency. Can't tell you how many times we'd send a client a translation, which had been translated and edited and proofed by three different native speakers of that language, and the client would call up and say, "We have an employee here who speaks that language and they say your translation is wrong."

Many people in the US speak other languages, but they haven't necessarily *learned* the language, as in had a single class on proper grammar, syntax, etc. Learning a language only by hearing other people speak it does not necessarily mean that you are an expert in that language. (Just look at some of the "English" on social media sites for examples.) Just as anyone can adjust a font on a brochure, but it takes training to put together a nice-looking brochure, anyone can learn to speak a language, but there's a reason there are college degrees in translation.

Or the employee might speak a regional variant of that language, and not the standard. French is spoken in France, in Canada and in many African countries. Spanish is spoken in Spain, many South American countries, the US (with Mexican and Puerto Rican variants) and other places. English is spoken in the UK, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Australian, Canada, the US, and many other places.

And telling us that your employee says that "November" is not correctly spelled isn't going to get  us to change the spelling. We checked our dictionaries. We don't know where your employee learned to spell.

I have learned to fear the phrase, "We have someone in-house who . . . ." It never ends well.
A graphic design challenge related to translations...

I am working on a flyer that is English on the front and Spanish on the back. It has been my experience that Spanish translations are longer/more words so I have to adjust the layout a bit. It never fails that people comment that the Spanish side font looks like a different point size/condensed/longer, etc. than the English side. Yes, yes it does. There is very little I can do about that.

Heh. Try Japanese or Chinese--which take up much less space than most European-style languages.

And a client who has a brochure they want translated into 15 languages, who can't understand that we could not just cut and past each language over the existing English, because German tends to need more space than English, Japanese needs much less, etc.

We had a wonderful desktop publishing department who really knew how to tweak margins, font sizes, leading, graphic sizes and other things to get each language to look good on the page. But the clients would freak out because the illustration on page 2 was larger in the Japanese version and smaller in the Italian version--they had to be all the same size! And they had to look good on the page! And the text couldn't be squished! Nor could it be a small block of text floating in the middle of the page!

You are paying a profession for a service you cannot possibly do for yourself. Why do you not trust the explanations of said professional? Or at least double-check what they are telling you (you know, like maybe on the internet)?
 
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


athersgeo

  • No one told you when to run
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 332
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #20 on: Yesterday at 03:44:34 PM »
I do have a classic example of the belief that 'anyone can do it'. I'm not a designer, but because a client asked I spent the best part of 8 hours over a couple of days, with client feedback, on photo layout for promotional materials, kept it simple, clean fonts, and so on. I thought this was a fast turnaround, but the client did not. They said they could do it better for the next run in-house, because feedback and photo changes was far too much work and they had a volunteer with a computer.  The result was one page of text. No pictures, five colours for emphasis, (and because pale yellow text should always be used on a white background), a system font in about seven random sizes, etc. To save costs they printed it greyscale, so I only discovered the funky colors when I saw it online.

There is a happy ending. Mine got a 10% response rate. Theirs didn't - and that's not 'didn't get 10%', that's 'didn't have a response rate' so I've been asked back to design their next campaign.

Re the bolded: I used to work at a translation agency. Can't tell you how many times we'd send a client a translation, which had been translated and edited and proofed by three different native speakers of that language, and the client would call up and say, "We have an employee here who speaks that language and they say your translation is wrong."

Many people in the US speak other languages, but they haven't necessarily *learned* the language, as in had a single class on proper grammar, syntax, etc. Learning a language only by hearing other people speak it does not necessarily mean that you are an expert in that language. (Just look at some of the "English" on social media sites for examples.) Just as anyone can adjust a font on a brochure, but it takes training to put together a nice-looking brochure, anyone can learn to speak a language, but there's a reason there are college degrees in translation.

Or the employee might speak a regional variant of that language, and not the standard. French is spoken in France, in Canada and in many African countries. Spanish is spoken in Spain, many South American countries, the US (with Mexican and Puerto Rican variants) and other places. English is spoken in the UK, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Australian, Canada, the US, and many other places.

And telling us that your employee says that "November" is not correctly spelled isn't going to get  us to change the spelling. We checked our dictionaries. We don't know where your employee learned to spell.

I have learned to fear the phrase, "We have someone in-house who . . . ." It never ends well.
A graphic design challenge related to translations...

I am working on a flyer that is English on the front and Spanish on the back. It has been my experience that Spanish translations are longer/more words so I have to adjust the layout a bit. It never fails that people comment that the Spanish side font looks like a different point size/condensed/longer, etc. than the English side. Yes, yes it does. There is very little I can do about that.

Could be worse. Could be German - which generally uses one very long word where English would use four or five short ones - or (and this was my "favourite") you could be trying to get something to look identical in English, French, Spanish and German.

It took me three phone calls to the designer (I'm a programmer) before she comprehended that there was no way on this little green planet of ours that the website navigation was going to fit in a space sized/designed for the English version only... (It didn't help that we weren't going to have the finalised translations for any of the copy until after I'd finished the build... It was...not a fun project.)

MommyPenguin

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4632
    • My blog!
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #21 on: Yesterday at 03:50:13 PM »
I'd start sending people a document with the various translations in fonts that exactly match letter/character to letter/character to illustrate the fact that it takes more letters/characters to write the same thing in some languages and fewer in others.

Sirius

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10017
  • Stars in my eyes!
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #22 on: Yesterday at 04:43:37 PM »
This isn't exactly graphics and design, but I was once asked to insert a paragraph into a medical document, and was told, "But don't add on another page, because this has to be exactly 5 pages to go to (some reviewing authority.)"  I was able to do it with the first two paragraphs I was asked to insert, but after the fourth one I simply couldn't make it fit no matter what I did short of making the font small enough to require a magnifying glass. 

What was really annoying about the whole thing was that I'd print it up and send it along...and three days later would get it back with more changes to be made, but always with the requirement that I had to make it fit on five pages.  After the fourth time, when there was no way I could make everything fit, I simply told the person who brought it to me that if they wanted it to fit they'd have to cut something else out.    You'd have thought I'd suggested that the cuts be made to limbs with the reaction I got. 

This was a classic case of having too many people reviewing a document, and everyone wanting their share of it.  By the time the document was approved and sent on its way I'd spent hours on it that I really hadn't had to spare. 

Fi

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 416
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #23 on: Yesterday at 05:26:49 PM »
The words I have learned to dread most in my profession are "but I have InDesign at home!"

Layout is like ballet - some very showy stuff that makes people go "oooh" is actually a doddle if you're skilled enough. But minor stiff that looks like anyone could do it can actually be the most complicated work of all.

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5215
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #24 on: Yesterday at 06:35:13 PM »
The words I have learned to dread most in my profession are "but I have InDesign at home!"

Layout is like ballet - some very showy stuff that makes people go "oooh" is actually a doddle if you're skilled enough. But minor stiff that looks like anyone could do it can actually be the most complicated work of all.

And my response is A: Then use it!  or B: So why do you need me?

Moralia

  • That's just tacky, tacky, tacky!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2246
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #25 on: Today at 12:59:07 PM »
My pet peeve is people using the wrong software for a project, like text-heavy layouts in Photoshop or Illustrator (CRUD MONKEYS! - why do so many supposedly professional designers use Illustrator for that? The text editing is so clumsy and memory wasting.) or drawing vector graphics in InDesign.  :o
I can't tell you how many projects I've had to rebuild from scratch because of this.

It's also fun re-building big documents provided by someone who never bothered to learn how to use Master Pages or Styles. "Oh, you want me to change the font of the subsection headers on all 220 pages? If the document you supplied had been built right in the first place, it would take 30 minutes and I'd do it free. Instead, I'm gonna bill you for the hours it'll take to go through and clean that stuff up. On the other hand if I need to add an obnoxious customer surcharge, such people rarely understand that my rebuilt document takes a lot less time to revise. ;)

I'm not evil, though. If the client is nice and willing, I'll teach them a bit at a time and they love me for making their jobs easier. "Wait, I don't have to copy and paste the logo onto each page and it will stay locked in place unless I want to move it?  Thank you, thank you, thank you!"

Fi

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 416
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #26 on: Today at 04:00:39 PM »
Oh, masters and stylesheets!

I joke that I'm very lazy at work - which is why all my colleagues come to me for technical tips, because I have OCD templates. But they all - especially my boss - appreciate that my "laziness" is that I'm willing to spend a couple of hours to turn a regular five-minute task into a ten-second one. And I'm willing to teach everyone else how to do. Also, I'm the one on our team whose work actually allowed them to do it in the first place.

Happy days are when I get asked if I've got time to debug something. "CSI: Creative Suite" is my favourite work activity. Note, there is no "enhance" button involved!

Moralia

  • That's just tacky, tacky, tacky!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2246
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #27 on: Today at 06:45:17 PM »
;)

 I call it "constructive indolence".

At my current workplace, my bosses are amazed that I get more done on my own than the two people I replaced  were doing previously.  Looking at their work and working with one of them before she quit, I know why. Sweet gals, but not methodical. I haven't let on that I'm not at full capacity...not because I'm lazy but because I do need a part-time minion so I can take more than one vacation day at a time! The company has had some financial setbacks but we're probably going to be able to hire someone this year. *knock on wood*

CrazyDaffodilLady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1370
Re: s/o It's Not Like It's Work! (graphics and design edition)
« Reply #28 on: Today at 09:13:33 PM »
One of my favorite coworkers of all time was incredibly lazy.  However, she frequently came up with absolutely brilliant ways to streamline our processes and eliminate effort.  Her laziness ultimately saved the company a lot of money and resulted in less work for everyone. 
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.