Author Topic: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?  (Read 5649 times)

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Millionaire Maria

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #45 on: November 01, 2013, 11:23:18 AM »
Honestly,  your expectations seem really unrealistic.  Some kids won't be able to eat some treats because they aren't compatible with braces.  If every single potential issue for every subgroup in the population was eliminated, they would have to stop trick or treating all together.

I do not, for the life of me, understand what is unrealistic about wanting to have easy access to information about treats that children with special circumstances can enjoy. At no point have I said that I expect other people to have treats for everyone. I can not understand the opposition to people, who want to accommodate everyone, being given the resources to do so. If you don't want to try to accommodate as many children as possible, that's fine. No one is saying that you should. But why oppose other people who are trying to?
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Sharnita

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #46 on: November 01, 2013, 11:30:16 AM »
The thing is, you really do seem to expect that people should want to accommodate allergies.

Millionaire Maria

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #47 on: November 01, 2013, 11:35:30 AM »
The thing is, you really do seem to expect that people should want to accommodate allergies.

Please provide examples to support that claim.
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TeamBhakta

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #48 on: November 01, 2013, 12:05:46 PM »
What kind of candy is that? I mean it would have to be nut free, gluten free,  dairy free, sugar free ...

That sounds like pretty unappealing candy.

I'll bet it's very appealing to the kids who can't have anything else.

It's unrealistic. We had someone on another thread who works in a factory that makes gluten free products (or something like that) on certain days. They use bunny suits, flags on fork lifts and don't allow contaminants in the area, but still can't guarantee the product is 100% allergen free. And if they can't do that, how do you expect people to ensure that for random strangers' kids no less ? Shoot, I'm allergic to green peppers and aspartame; and I know there's candies flavored with both of those. But I don't call radio stations asking people to have an alternative to it on hand.

JenJay

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #49 on: November 01, 2013, 12:24:52 PM »
A moot point this late in the holiday season, but re: accommodating trick-or-treaters with allergies, I always keep a bowl of chocolatey treats and a bowl of non-edible treats, like temporary tattoos or stickers. Lots of children choose the tattoos over the chocolate! I love it, because they're vegan/kosher/gluten-free and, unlike a plastic cauldron full of York peppermint patties, I'm not tempted to raid the bowl!

That's brilliant and I'm going to set up a non-candy treat bowl next year, too. Thank you!

Tea Drinker

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #50 on: November 01, 2013, 02:46:57 PM »
If I was handing out candy (the building I live in now doesn't seem to be set up for trick-or-treating) I would want to accommodate allergies. Not, perhaps, everything: but I could as easily buy two or three different kinds of treat (for example, relatively plain chocolates, and something like Smarties or packets of jelly beans) as a larger amount of just one thing. But I might not think of it, without specific people and their known allergies in mind. I might just think "hey, I like the dark chocolate milky ways, I'll get those and eat any that are left over after Halloween." So while that sort of human interest/feature reminder might not be necessary, it doesn't feel snowflakey, if done from the point of view of "Local family has a child with an allergy, so makes a point of having several different kinds of candy for trick-or-treaters" rather than "woe is me, my child can't eat most of the Halloween candy."
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Promise

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #51 on: November 01, 2013, 02:51:30 PM »
This is a good teaching opportunity about his allergy. You won't be able to protect him from every instance that he comes in contact with food he can't eat. Begin now by going through his candy with him, telling him and showing him which ones have peanuts and that eating that will make him very sick. Let him keep the ones that are ok and you eat the ones that are not. Of course you keep them secured in a place where he can't get them!

Deetee

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #52 on: November 01, 2013, 03:06:23 PM »
This is a good teaching opportunity about his allergy. You won't be able to protect him from every instance that he comes in contact with food he can't eat. Begin now by going through his candy with him, telling him and showing him which ones have peanuts and that eating that will make him very sick. Let him keep the ones that are ok and you eat the ones that are not. Of course you keep them secured in a place where he can't get them!

This is about what I was going to post. I think a very , very, very important skill to teach a child with an allergy is that they are responsible for ensuring that what goes into their mouth is safe. This can start very early with the child NEVER eating something that was not given to them by a parent.

One of the kids at my daughter's kindergarten is allergic and I was chatting to her mom at a birthday party. The little girl came running up and showed some food to her mom and her mom quickly glanced at it and said it was OK. The mom mentioned that she just does that with everything so the girl knows that she must vet everything.  Right now, it is through a parent, but she is already aware that all food must go through a "Is this safe?" phase so when she is older she will do the check herself.

I thought this was a good system.

lowspark

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #53 on: November 01, 2013, 03:13:55 PM »
One of my coworkers has a daughter, 9 years old, who is allergic to peanuts. So I asked her what they do. She said they just toss the candy she can't eat. Or rather, they gave it to her nephew who happened to be visiting. We had a back and forth conversation about it and here's the gist of what she told me.

The daughter understands her peanut allergy and understands that she has to be careful about what she eats. She (the daughter) reads labels and avoids things that have been manufactured in places which have peanuts (although apparently she can eat some of those things). She doesn't get upset or disappointed about things she can't eat as she's pretty used to it. I was listing out the candy we had handed out last night, kitkat, whoppers, reese's & hershey's milk chocolate. Coworker said, oh, she can eat all of those except the reese's!

So, that's just one perspective but my coworker was really casual about the whole thing. I got the idea that, sure, it's an inconvenience and they hope she will outgrow the allergy as they test her periodically, and she has outgrown some other food allergies, but in the grand scheme of things, it's just not that big a deal. They deal with it and don't make it out to be anything to get in a twist about and the daughter takes it mostly in stride.

cass2591

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Re: Is There A Polite Way Of Conveying This Message?
« Reply #54 on: November 01, 2013, 03:29:47 PM »
Quote
Why is attempting to draw public attention to a common issue appearing to be so offensive to people?

It's not the message in this case, albeit rather unrealistic considering it's Halloween, but the delivery. Thread locked.
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