Author Topic: Shopping carts at Aldi's....  (Read 5191 times)

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Layla Miller

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2014, 08:57:05 PM »
I'm not particularly "anti" debit card; I've just never had any reason to get one.  Credit cards have always worked fine for me, aside from the occasional situation where cash is preferable.  Also, like Greenbird, I pay off the balance every month and I get rewards, so there's that.  :)
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Vall

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #31 on: February 17, 2014, 10:05:28 PM »
I am yet another person who has never had a debit card.  I use cash, checks or a credit card.  If a debit card is compromised, the thief could empty my account.  I don't want to take that risk.

MurPl1

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #32 on: February 22, 2014, 01:54:56 AM »
In the US, if there is fraudulent activity on your card, your liability on a credit card is $50 but $500 on a debit.  So even if I had a debit and have the option, I use it as a credit card (signature, etc).


As far as Aldi's, DH likes the store and buys water, gatorade-type drinks for his crews at work.  And fake Red Bull.  Along with the few random other items.  I'll occasionally go with him, but I'm not impressed.  I don't like their lack of selection on items.  And as much as they tout cart for cart comparisons with other stores, I find that disingenuous.  I'm still going to end up having to go to the real grocery store for the rest of the items I need.

And the coin for cart thing?  How on earth does that work for a mother of young children?  Sure you can send your 10 yo back up with the cart and get the quarter.  But 2 kids under 5?  No one I know would leave their children unattended while they went back up for the cart.  And in my area people aren't desperate to save quarters. So the carts still end up floating around the lot until the next person happens to grab it.

perpetua

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #33 on: February 22, 2014, 03:35:14 AM »
In the US, if there is fraudulent activity on your card, your liability on a credit card is $50 but $500 on a debit.  So even if I had a debit and have the option, I use it as a credit card (signature, etc).

Can someone please explain to me how this works? Perhaps it's one for the Transatlantic board, I don't know. But I'm not seeing how a single card can be either a debit card (debiting money instantly from your current account) OR a credit card (adding an amount to a balance on a different account which gets paid off at a later date).

crella

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #34 on: February 22, 2014, 04:42:16 AM »
You can choose at the register how you want to use the card, there are buttons on the machine or on-screen choices for 'Debit' and 'Credit' . There can be a limit imposed by the bank on how much you can process in a single transaction as a debit (I suppose to limit losses if it's stolen).


Edited for clarity.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2014, 04:45:03 AM by crella »

perpetua

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #35 on: February 22, 2014, 04:48:01 AM »
You can choose at the register how you want to use the card, there are buttons on the machine or on-screen choices for 'Debit' and 'Credit' . There can be a limit imposed by the bank on how much you can process in a single transaction as a debit (I suppose to limit losses if it's stolen).


Edited for clarity.

Yes, I understand that - but how can one card operate presumably two accounts? Are both account details loaded onto the card somehow? How do the mechanics work?

A debit card here debits money from your current account.

A credit card adds the cost of the item onto a running balance which you then pay off at the end of the month (or whenever).

They're totally separate things.

Are they not, over there? Are they something different?

crella

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #36 on: February 22, 2014, 05:01:31 AM »
Quote

Yes, I understand that - but how can one card operate presumably two accounts? Are both account details loaded onto the card somehow? How do the mechanics work?

I'm sorry, I think I misunderstood what you were asking. My card is a bank-issued debit/credit card, so both my credit purchases and debit purchases are taken out of the same account.  I haven't got a separate credit card (non bank issued credit only) in the US, so I don't know how those work as I've never had one (I am an American in Japan for 30+ years).

perpetua

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #37 on: February 22, 2014, 05:08:55 AM »
Quote

Yes, I understand that - but how can one card operate presumably two accounts? Are both account details loaded onto the card somehow? How do the mechanics work?

I'm sorry, I think I misunderstood what you were asking. My card is a bank-issued debit/credit card, so both my credit purchases and debit purchases are taken out of the same account.  I haven't got a separate credit card (non bank issued credit only) in the US, so I don't know how those work as I've never had one (I am an American in Japan for 30+ years).

Thanks crella. I'm still not seeing it though. I don't understand how something you buy on your 'credit card' comes out of your current account, or the same account that you use your debit card for, or how one card can operate two accounts.

I think a 'credit card' (or at least a credit purchase) must be something different in the States, from reading this: http://banking.about.com/od/checkingaccounts/a/debitvscredit.htm

In the UK, a 'credit card' is totally separate to your current (what you guys would call a 'checking') account. It is issued by a credit card company and they give you a credit limit of say, 3000. You can then spend anything up to 3000 on that card. You have to apply for one and they credit score you before they approve your application. It's absolutely nothing to do with your current account, apart from the fact that you'll have a direct debit set up on your current account to pay the credit card bill once a month. You get a bill or a statement every month and you can either make the minimum payment or pay it off in full. Nothing comes out of your bank account until the date you 'pay' your credit card bill.

Sorry if I'm being dense. I just do not understand this. I think they must be totally different things to what we have here hence the confusion.

From a purely practical standpoint I would not like to have one card that does everything (if that's what these things are?). If I lose my debit card I can still use my credit card until a replacement debit card arrives so I'm not stuck without money.

kckgirl

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #38 on: February 22, 2014, 08:57:10 AM »
A Visa/MasterCard debit card is only different in how it's processed. My debit card has a Visa logo on it. It can be used as a debit with PIN, or it can be used as a Visa card. The money comes from the same account (debit immediately, Visa usually a day or two later depending on when the store processes it). It isn't a credit card that is paid later, but it can be used in places where they do not accept debit cards.
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katycoo

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #39 on: February 22, 2014, 08:59:55 AM »
Quote

Yes, I understand that - but how can one card operate presumably two accounts? Are both account details loaded onto the card somehow? How do the mechanics work?

I'm sorry, I think I misunderstood what you were asking. My card is a bank-issued debit/credit card, so both my credit purchases and debit purchases are taken out of the same account.  I haven't got a separate credit card (non bank issued credit only) in the US, so I don't know how those work as I've never had one (I am an American in Japan for 30+ years).

Thanks crella. I'm still not seeing it though. I don't understand how something you buy on your 'credit card' comes out of your current account, or the same account that you use your debit card for, or how one card can operate two accounts.

I think a 'credit card' (or at least a credit purchase) must be something different in the States, from reading this: http://banking.about.com/od/checkingaccounts/a/debitvscredit.htm

In the UK, a 'credit card' is totally separate to your current (what you guys would call a 'checking') account. It is issued by a credit card company and they give you a credit limit of say, 3000. You can then spend anything up to 3000 on that card. You have to apply for one and they credit score you before they approve your application. It's absolutely nothing to do with your current account, apart from the fact that you'll have a direct debit set up on your current account to pay the credit card bill once a month. You get a bill or a statement every month and you can either make the minimum payment or pay it off in full. Nothing comes out of your bank account until the date you 'pay' your credit card bill.

Sorry if I'm being dense. I just do not understand this. I think they must be totally different things to what we have here hence the confusion.

From a purely practical standpoint I would not like to have one card that does everything (if that's what these things are?). If I lose my debit card I can still use my credit card until a replacement debit card arrives so I'm not stuck without money.

OK - a debit card allows you to use the card in circumstances where credit is the only available option for paying - ie. online.  BUT it doesn't actually HAVE a line of credit - it makes the payment via the credit network (eg VISA or Mastercard) but still debits the money from your account.

If you only had a regular EFTPOS only card, you can't use it to make purchases online (without Paypal or similar).

You can use a debit card via the credit network on an EFTPOS machine too - just by pressing hte credit button.  There's no real benefit in doing so though unless there's some kind of fee that could be avoided.  But you could if you wanted to.

perpetua

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #40 on: February 22, 2014, 09:13:53 AM »
Quote

Yes, I understand that - but how can one card operate presumably two accounts? Are both account details loaded onto the card somehow? How do the mechanics work?

I'm sorry, I think I misunderstood what you were asking. My card is a bank-issued debit/credit card, so both my credit purchases and debit purchases are taken out of the same account.  I haven't got a separate credit card (non bank issued credit only) in the US, so I don't know how those work as I've never had one (I am an American in Japan for 30+ years).

Thanks crella. I'm still not seeing it though. I don't understand how something you buy on your 'credit card' comes out of your current account, or the same account that you use your debit card for, or how one card can operate two accounts.

I think a 'credit card' (or at least a credit purchase) must be something different in the States, from reading this: http://banking.about.com/od/checkingaccounts/a/debitvscredit.htm

In the UK, a 'credit card' is totally separate to your current (what you guys would call a 'checking') account. It is issued by a credit card company and they give you a credit limit of say, 3000. You can then spend anything up to 3000 on that card. You have to apply for one and they credit score you before they approve your application. It's absolutely nothing to do with your current account, apart from the fact that you'll have a direct debit set up on your current account to pay the credit card bill once a month. You get a bill or a statement every month and you can either make the minimum payment or pay it off in full. Nothing comes out of your bank account until the date you 'pay' your credit card bill.

Sorry if I'm being dense. I just do not understand this. I think they must be totally different things to what we have here hence the confusion.

From a purely practical standpoint I would not like to have one card that does everything (if that's what these things are?). If I lose my debit card I can still use my credit card until a replacement debit card arrives so I'm not stuck without money.

OK - a debit card allows you to use the card in circumstances where credit is the only available option for paying - ie. online.  BUT it doesn't actually HAVE a line of credit - it makes the payment via the credit network (eg VISA or Mastercard) but still debits the money from your account.

If you only had a regular EFTPOS only card, you can't use it to make purchases online (without Paypal or similar).

You can use a debit card via the credit network on an EFTPOS machine too - just by pressing hte credit button.  There's no real benefit in doing so though unless there's some kind of fee that could be avoided.  But you could if you wanted to.

So what's a credit card, then?
Are credit cards not the same thing in the US as they are here?

Here, it's a line of credit.

I have a Barclaycard (which is a credit card issued by Barclays) with something like a 2.5k credit limit. I also have a bank account with Lloyds Bank, with which I have an associated debit card. If I want to buy something and pay for it straight away, I pay with my Lloyds debit card and the money comes straight out of my bank account (sometimes it can take a couple of days). If I want to buy something and not pay for it straight away, I 'put it on my credit card'.

Every month I get a bill from Barclaycard listing the transactions I've made on the credit card that month and what my overall balance (ie, what I owe Barclaycard) is. So, I may have had a balance of 1000 on there and made another 500 worth of purchases this month so now I owe them 1500. I can either make the minimum payment they ask for on my credit card statement, or pay the balance in full (or any amount I want to pay, actaully, as long as it's more than the minimum payment). I also have a direct debit set up on my Lloyds bank account to pay my credit card's minimum payment automatically every month so I never get any late fees.

To determine which account I buy things with I use *either* my debit card or my credit card at the till. There's no 'debit or credit' option. It's impossible because the accounts are completely separate, with separate institutions. Things that you put on your credit card don't come out of your bank account. They're added to the outstanding balance on your credit card account, which is then paid off at a later date. This is why I think we must be talking about completely different things and that a 'credit purchase' isn't the same thing as 'putting something on your credit card' would be here.

It's confusing the ehell out of me though.

kckgirl

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #41 on: February 22, 2014, 10:04:08 AM »
We have regular credit cards, too, that work just like yours does.

Many gasoline stations do not accept debit cards at the pump. I can use my Visa logo debit card there, and the station processes it as a credit transaction. It is not a credit card, but my purchase can be processed as a credit transaction, if necessary. The funds still come out of my account.

An example of why you would choose 'credit' instead of 'debit': A local credit union started charging 10 cents per debit transaction, but nothing for credit transactions. When I was still their customer, with every debit card purchase I made I chose the 'credit' option to avoid the fee (which I still think is ridiculous).
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perpetua

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2014, 10:13:24 AM »
We have regular credit cards, too, that work just like yours does.

Many gasoline stations do not accept debit cards at the pump. I can use my Visa logo debit card there, and the station processes it as a credit transaction. It is not a credit card, but my purchase can be processed as a credit transaction, if necessary. The funds still come out of my account.

An example of why you would choose 'credit' instead of 'debit': A local credit union started charging 10 cents per debit transaction, but nothing for credit transactions. When I was still their customer, with every debit card purchase I made I chose the 'credit' option to avoid the fee (which I still think is ridiculous).

OK, so, the card that you might say 'debit or credit' while using isn't actually a credit card. It's a debit card that can either take something from your account straight away which is called 'debit' or not straight away which is called 'credit'... even though it still debits it from your account.

Confusing.

I'm not sure I'm understanding what a 'credit transaction' is, or why it's called a credit transaction, if it debits money from your account and doesn't go on a credit account.

A few years ago we used to have two different types of debit cards. Regular debit cards on current accounts would sometimes take up to three days to take the money for a transaction. Then there were sort of 'baby debit cards' (Visa Electron) which took the money straight away, the theory being that they were given to people with bad credit so they couldn't go overdrawn on their current accounts. So I guess it's a similar principle to how those things work but here it was two separate cards again.

Anyway, sorry for the sidetrack folks. Just one of those weird terminology things, I guess.

crella

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #43 on: February 23, 2014, 04:46:19 AM »
Thank you kckgirl, for clarifying that!  I got my first debit card 4 years ago and use it on trips to the US twice a year or so, and all this time I thought that because it had a VISA logo on it that it was a dual card. Dummy me!  :D :D :D It took me some time to get used to using them after being out of the US for 30 years, and I can see that I still haven't 'got' all the different aspects of it. After being away that long, I can't get a credit card, as I have no credit rating in the US. Thank you for the info!

katycoo

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Re: Shopping carts at Aldi's....
« Reply #44 on: February 23, 2014, 07:19:26 PM »
We have regular credit cards, too, that work just like yours does.

Many gasoline stations do not accept debit cards at the pump. I can use my Visa logo debit card there, and the station processes it as a credit transaction. It is not a credit card, but my purchase can be processed as a credit transaction, if necessary. The funds still come out of my account.

An example of why you would choose 'credit' instead of 'debit': A local credit union started charging 10 cents per debit transaction, but nothing for credit transactions. When I was still their customer, with every debit card purchase I made I chose the 'credit' option to avoid the fee (which I still think is ridiculous).

OK, so, the card that you might say 'debit or credit' while using isn't actually a credit card. It's a debit card that can either take something from your account straight away which is called 'debit' or not straight away which is called 'credit'... even though it still debits it from your account.

Confusing.

I'm not sure I'm understanding what a 'credit transaction' is, or why it's called a credit transaction, if it debits money from your account and doesn't go on a credit account.

A few years ago we used to have two different types of debit cards. Regular debit cards on current accounts would sometimes take up to three days to take the money for a transaction. Then there were sort of 'baby debit cards' (Visa Electron) which took the money straight away, the theory being that they were given to people with bad credit so they couldn't go overdrawn on their current accounts. So I guess it's a similar principle to how those things work but here it was two separate cards again.

Anyway, sorry for the sidetrack folks. Just one of those weird terminology things, I guess.

Using a debit card whether by EFTPOS or credit takes your money straight away.  It just changes the network over which your payments is sent.  These networks charge different fees to the vendor, who may pass them onto you.

EFTPOS card - can only use the EFTPOS network - direct banking transfers.  Has no line of credit - it can only make payment with the funds available in your account.

Credit card - can only use the credit network (eg VISA or mastercard).  This is a line of credit which you pay for at a later stage.

Debit card - can use either network based on your selection, but has no line of credit and can only make payment with the funds available in your account. Useful where only the credit network is available, but you do not wish to pay on real credit.