Author Topic: "That's Not In My Job Description..."  (Read 3524 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2013, 08:28:15 AM »
My responses are in red:

From where I sit, if my employer is mandating volunteer work *and* has to approve the type of work or the charity involved, I need to be paid for that time, either by overtime pay or by volunteering during work hours. Because at that point, while I might be volunteering for the charity, I'm doing the work to keep my job. And that turns those hours into "working for my employer," not "volunteering out of the goodness of my heart for this particular charity."

Yes. I feel the same way. While I am all about volunteering and doing what I can, it means I choose what i want to volunteer for, wihtout having to get it "approved" by my employer, and I choose how much or how little I can/want to do on MY time
 

 
Personally, I don't think the company has any right to tell you what to do with your off-duty hours. If they want you to volunteer, they should provide the time for you to do that during your regular work hours, or give you time off to volunteer weekends/evenings.

I agree with this 100%. My company does "volunteer week" and they work with a number of groups, and you can choose which ones, if you want, you want to help out with. Its during working hours, and its completely optional. which is nice.  we've also, in my group, done some stuff in house, for various groups.

 
I would really like to know what consequences the company plans to give someone who can't do the volunteer hours. You know, the employee with a brand-new baby at home. The employee caring for an elderly parent with dementia at home. The employee who, unknown to the company, is working a second job to make ends meet.

I know this would be me, since I have TWO jobs, and very little free time. A one time thing, say a charity walk or something, sure, I can make time for that, but on a regular basis. I don't think so. I have a difficult enough time getting my own housework and errands done!

I'd be tempted to consult with a labor attorney on this one.

Harriet Jones

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2013, 08:57:37 AM »
Thing is, she's the boss' daughter. These things might work for a regular colleague, but I'm betting daddy is right behind this.

Being the boss' daughter isn't going to protect her from any actual legal issues.

Bexx27

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2013, 09:15:37 AM »
My company offers a special category of paid leave for volunteer work. Is this an option so you could volunteer on company time instead of your own?
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Twik

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2013, 09:47:26 AM »
The thing that would really skeeve me out is the "I've given you a minimum, but don't you really want to do *more* than the minimum?"

It reminds me of a book I read, about the Cultural Revolution. A group of students is staying after class to create posters praising Chairman Mao. They keep working and working, into the wee small hours of the night, because no one dares to be the first one to say, "There, I think we've done enough."
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2013, 09:58:52 AM »
I agree that you should probably get legal advice here.  Because I'm pretty sure it isn't legal for the company to demand that you work for free, which is essentially what they are doing.

Asking you to wear a company T-shirt when you are doing any of your volunteering isn't really OK, either, as far as I'm concerned.  It's like being asked to donate $2 at the register for X charity.  Sure, it's only $2 but the company gets a big ol' tax receipt based on my and everybody else's money when they donate what they collected.  If I'm donating, I'm getting the benefit, TYVM.  In the case of the T-shirt, the company gets free advertising.

What is OK is for the company to ask for volunteers to work paid overtime to man a booth at an event on a weekend - or at least offer compensating time off - and everyone can choose whether or not to do it.  Or they can organize volunteer days during the regular work week and employees can participate as they choose and get paid their regular salary.  But essentially working for free?  That would be no.
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Hillia

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2013, 10:02:58 AM »
My company is also all about giving back to the community.  They support volunteerism in a few ways:
1.  Employees who volunteer with a specific group can log their volunteer time in a company database. If you log even one hour in a quarter, you can apply for a $200 donation to your organization, selected by random drawing. There are some rules in place about what organizations qualify: must be a 501(c) 3 or a school; no political or faith based organizations, etc.

2.  The company organizes and offers volunteering opportunities outside of work hours.  They are voluntary, attendance is not monitored.  They will also help your work team organize a volunteer day if you have a specific project in mind

3.  The company also offers occasional volunteer activities during work hours - my team recently spent a few hours tying fleece throws for nursing home residents.

All of this is organized and managed by a dedicated team of community service coordinators, working closely with HR and legal to be sure everything stays legal and appropriate.  They also make sure to publicize and thank the volunteers who participate, and do followup with the organization to see how the work benefited them, fine tune the experience, and develop ongoing relationships.  *That's* how you get your company's name 'out there'.

Edited because the volunteer coordinators are not themselves volunteers; that is a regular full time paid position and has its own budget.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2013, 10:04:57 AM by Hillia »

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Twik

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2013, 10:04:35 AM »
I doubt Boss's Daughter understands her own hypocrisy here.

She wants to be seen as "caring about the community," but really, she's looking at it as coldblooded advertising. Only volunteering that's in the public eye is acceptable. Someone, say, teaching Sunday School or visiting a nursing home probably wouldn't be "approved," because it's hard to plaster a "My Company" logo over the work.

In the OP's case, Boss's Daughter would actually be depriving certain charities of her efforts not because they were unworthy, but because they don't give the "payback" in publicity to the company.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Hillia

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2013, 10:06:38 AM »
You know, what it comes down to is does your company really want to give to and participate in the community, or do they just want the credit for appearing to do so?  The situation you describe is really the company pushing the cost of community service on to the employees, but still reaping the PR benefit.  If they really want to give back, they need to invest some company resources outside of printing up some cheap T shirts.

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LeveeWoman

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2013, 10:10:06 AM »
I doubt Boss's Daughter understands her own hypocrisy here.

She wants to be seen as "caring about the community," but really, she's looking at it as coldblooded advertising. Only volunteering that's in the public eye is acceptable. Someone, say, teaching Sunday School or visiting a nursing home probably wouldn't be "approved," because it's hard to plaster a "My Company" logo over the work.

In the OP's case, Boss's Daughter would actually be depriving certain charities of her efforts not because they were unworthy, but because they don't give the "payback" in publicity to the company.

I wouldn't be surprised if she hopes to get accolades from the charities for bringing in all those volunteers.

Twik

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2013, 10:12:02 AM »
You know, what it comes down to is does your company really want to give to and participate in the community, or do they just want the credit for appearing to do so?   The situation you describe is really the company pushing the cost of community service on to the employees, but still reaping the PR benefit.  If they really want to give back, they need to invest some company resources outside of printing up some cheap T shirts.

The highlighted bit is what I would stress in the Q&A.

If you need to make it appear more company-oriented, explain that most people who see Jim or Sara doing volunteer work wearing a Company X t-shirt think merely, "hm, Jim and Sara are great people! Oh, and they're thrifty by wearing their work clothes while volunteering," not "Gee, Company X is really into helping the community!" If the company wants the credit, *they* will have to do work, not rely on their employees acting as human billboards while being virtuous.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

lowspark

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #25 on: November 12, 2013, 10:15:12 AM »
I don't think that any of the following is relevant:
-if you volunteer
-what you do when you volunteer
-how many hours you currently volunteer

The reason I say that is because I'm sure that there are employees who don't volunteer at all, and this new requirement is wrong as much for them as it is for you. The company has no right to require you to do anything in your off hours. They can ask. They can suggest. They can distribute information and supply company resources. But they can't require it.

Just wondering, what is the consequence for not meeting their expectations on this? Bad reviews? Pay cut? Termination? That would actually be my first question.

So, I guess, at the meeting, I'd probably just ask the highest up manager(s) to clarify if these new "guidelines" are actually mandatory and what the consequences are for not participating.

Wordgeek

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Re: "That's Not In My Job Description..."
« Reply #26 on: November 12, 2013, 10:17:33 AM »
Insofar as this is an etiquette matter, the OP has received adequate advice.