Author Topic: 16 People On Things They Couldn’t Believe About America Until They Moved Here  (Read 42070 times)

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perpetua

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Looking back at the original article again, something struck me:

"   •   Many schools have orchestras, bands, theaters of a very high, almost professional quality. Free.
"

This. I'm so impressed by the standard of US school bands. I'm sure some are better than others, but take a look at the Langham Creek symphonic wind band. I can't believe they're of school age; it's stunningly good. They're better than some professional wind orchestras.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VR_I4mwEF8

I really don't think you'd find an equivalent here. School bands here are almost an afterthought unless you're at a specialist music college, which I always think is a great shame.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2013, 05:31:34 PM by perpetua »

jmarvellous

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... Again with the O/T, but I had several friends back in the day (before that video) who were in that very band, and incredibly dedicated to boot.

I never know if I'm impressed by music because I know nothing, or because it's actually amazing.  8)

perpetua

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... Again with the O/T, but I had several friends back in the day (before that video) who were in that very band, and incredibly dedicated to boot.

I never know if I'm impressed by music because I know nothing, or because it's actually amazing.  8)

What an amazing experience that must have been. They are stunningly, stunningly good. Their intonation is almost perfect. And that's hard with a wind orchestra.

But yes, I get the impression that music programmes in schools over there are very very good. We could do with a bit more of that in our education system.

marcel

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Me either. I haven't purchased checks for any of my accounts in YEARS.
Buying checks is something completely alien to me. Here, the bank supplies checkbooks.
In my experience, banks in the USA provide only a few starter checks, and if you need more, you buy them. When I used checks, I would usually buy mine from an outside vendor.
Our credit union will give you free checks, but only the plain safety paper ones.  Most people who still use checks want fun pictures on them, so they buy them, either from the bank/credit union, or from an online dealer.

Most of our regular bills are paid electronically. DH still writes 4 or 5 paper checks a month, as his weekly donation to his church.  They keep urging him to let them do weekly electronic transfers, but neither of us like the idea of letting someone else have access to our account.  Especially since the church's last pastor left under implications of  "financial mismanagement."

As I have said here before, I still find the whole concept of using checks bafling. I am 39 years old, and i can only remmebr having seen checks when I was a little kid (and when visiting the US). I have never used checks in my life, since they were already obsolete by the time I became responsible for my own finances. (well, probably at that time some people still used them, but they were definitely not common anymore even then.) Nowadays, most people in the netherlands will hardly know what it is if you give them a check, and definitely don't know what to do with them (except go to your bank and hope they can help you :)
Wherever you go..... There you are.

Katana_Geldar

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Do people still get paid by cheque? My work did, and a lot of people found it quaint and outdated.

MurPl1

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I still pay by check because my employees are mostly under 24 and somewhat transient.  They bounce banks with every new offer.  I do have several on direct deposit but many prefer to be able to cash their checks.

Oddly, they also tend to find it odd when a customer wants to pay for their delivery with a check.  We don't take personal checks but we have a few companies that will pay that way.  They seem to find that a little shady or outdated.  But gladly take their paychecks ;)

PastryGoddess

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I still get a paper check from some companies when I take a new contract.  In fact, I'm getting paper checks now, because the company that runs payroll doesn't want to set up direct deposit for the 9 week contract I'm on.

Luckily, my credit union will make the full amount available as long as it's deposited by 4pm EST.

Here is a website for ordering checks http://www.checksunlimited.com/.  There are dozens more like it online

katycoo

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Most of the homes I've lived in were built in the 1960's. They all had overhead lighting in all rooms (kitchen, dining, breakfast, bedrooms, studies, family rooms) except the formal living rooms. Overhead lighting was considered too harsh for formal living areas and lamp lighting was considered more flattering.

I guess I don't see why its forced?  I mean, nothing is stopping me from adding lamps to my loungeroom and choosing to use those instead of the ceiling lights. But I would prefer to have the option so that if I were doing something that required good light, like a puzzle, I could choose.

Except that I would always use the overhead lights because I personally prefer things to be as bright as humanly possible.

Hmmmmm

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Most of the homes I've lived in were built in the 1960's. They all had overhead lighting in all rooms (kitchen, dining, breakfast, bedrooms, studies, family rooms) except the formal living rooms. Overhead lighting was considered too harsh for formal living areas and lamp lighting was considered more flattering.

I guess I don't see why its forced?  I mean, nothing is stopping me from adding lamps to my loungeroom and choosing to use those instead of the ceiling lights. But I would prefer to have the option so that if I were doing something that required good light, like a puzzle, I could choose.

Except that I would always use the overhead lights because I personally prefer things to be as bright as humanly possible.

Oh, I think most new homes today have overhead lighting in all rooms. It's usually some type of canned or indirect lighting. Or like us, people in older homes will add some canned overhead lights. Our house was built in the 60's so the formal living didn't have overheads so we put it in. I personally do not like most lamp lighting for day to day life. It's fine when throwing a party but that's pretty much it.

violinp

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Looking back at the original article again, something struck me:

"   •   Many schools have orchestras, bands, theaters of a very high, almost professional quality. Free.
"

This. I'm so impressed by the standard of US school bands. I'm sure some are better than others, but take a look at the Langham Creek symphonic wind band. I can't believe they're of school age; it's stunningly good. They're better than some professional wind orchestras.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VR_I4mwEF8

I really don't think you'd find an equivalent here. School bands here are almost an afterthought unless you're at a specialist music college, which I always think is a great shame.

I was listening to the symphonic orchestra I was a part of in high school (public school - people from top band got to play with the string orchestra), and I realized, for the first time ever, how truly good we were. We could play intricate classical pieces as well arrangements from movie soundtracks like Superman Returns and Pirates of the Caribbean. While I was in high school, I always thought we sucked, because I always heard the mess - ups (and I still can, even after more than 4 years!), but now I realize how very hard those pieces were. Cabbage and I were in one of the best music programs where we lived, and the directors never let up on us or let us be slackers.

Unfortunately, there are even schools in the US where music programs are only an afterthought, and that really saddens me. One of the best things that ever happened to me was joining orchestra in middle school (11 years old), because I got a creative outlet and lots of friends I wouldn't have otherwise had, because I was so bullied otherwise.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


katycoo

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Most of the homes I've lived in were built in the 1960's. They all had overhead lighting in all rooms (kitchen, dining, breakfast, bedrooms, studies, family rooms) except the formal living rooms. Overhead lighting was considered too harsh for formal living areas and lamp lighting was considered more flattering.

I guess I don't see why its forced?  I mean, nothing is stopping me from adding lamps to my loungeroom and choosing to use those instead of the ceiling lights. But I would prefer to have the option so that if I were doing something that required good light, like a puzzle, I could choose.

Except that I would always use the overhead lights because I personally prefer things to be as bright as humanly possible.

Oh, I think most new homes today have overhead lighting in all rooms. It's usually some type of canned or indirect lighting. Or like us, people in older homes will add some canned overhead lights. Our house was built in the 60's so the formal living didn't have overheads so we put it in. I personally do not like most lamp lighting for day to day life. It's fine when throwing a party but that's pretty much it.

What do you mean by "canned light"?

magicdomino

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What do you mean by "canned light"?

Also known as recessed lights.  It's one lamp in a can sunk into the ceiling.


Katana_Geldar

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Oh, you mean down lights. They're a bit of a fad here. I hate them.

Diane AKA Traska

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This house has one room with no overhead light... the rear bedroom.  Instead, one socket (and I do meant one socket... the other one on the same plate is normal) is operated by the light switch.  It's baffling to me.  I prefer lamps, but if you drop something and can't find it, overhead is the way to go!
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jmarvellous

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This house has one room with no overhead light... the rear bedroom.  Instead, one socket (and I do meant one socket... the other one on the same plate is normal) is operated by the light switch.  It's baffling to me.  I prefer lamps, but if you drop something and can't find it, overhead is the way to go!

Makes sense to me (because I've lived it). You don't want the switch to control both things plugged into the socket. What if you have a lamp in one (which you'd want to turn on when you walked in) and an alarm clock or computer in the other, and someone flicks the switch without thinking?