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Author Topic: 16 People On Things They Couldn’t Believe About America Until They Moved Here  (Read 166360 times)

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Betelnut

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I've only had two toilet overflows in my experience, and that was with a broken or blocked toilet. I'm more worried about damp from the shower in a carpeted bathroom.

Yeah, I think I've only had an overflow a few times when I was a kid.  Now, if there is even a remote chance, I plunge the heck out of the toilet and it doesn't overflow.  Carpet in the bathroom is gross because bathrooms are steamy, wet places.
Native Texan, Marylander currently

Diane AKA Traska

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  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
I've only had two toilet overflows in my experience, and that was with a broken or blocked toilet. I'm more worried about damp from the shower in a carpeted bathroom.

Yeah, I think I've only had an overflow a few times when I was a kid.  Now, if there is even a remote chance, I plunge the heck out of the toilet and it doesn't overflow.  Carpet in the bathroom is gross because bathrooms are steamy, wet places.

It only needs to happen ONCE, though...
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Vall

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I've only had two toilet overflows in my experience, and that was with a broken or blocked toilet. I'm more worried about damp from the shower in a carpeted bathroom.
This is what would concern me too.  Are the bathroom carpets treated with an anti-mold and mildew chemical?  Is a special carpet pad needed due to all of the moisture?  When the carpet gets damp, is there an appliance that you can use to dry things out quickly so it doesn't get musty?

veryfluffy

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Are the bathroom carpets treated with an anti-mold and mildew chemical?  Is a special carpet pad needed due to all of the moisture?  When the carpet gets damp, is there an appliance that you can use to dry things out quickly so it doesn't get musty?

I think they are very synthetic and don't absorb any real moisture -- eg http://www.carpetright.co.uk/range-ocean-carpets.html.

But when I moved into my house, the first thing I did was rip the carpets out of the bathrooms.


   

jedikaiti

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It's not the carpets, it's the padding.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

perpetua

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I've only had two toilet overflows in my experience, and that was with a broken or blocked toilet. I'm more worried about damp from the shower in a carpeted bathroom.

Yeah, I think I've only had an overflow a few times when I was a kid.  Now, if there is even a remote chance, I plunge the heck out of the toilet and it doesn't overflow.  Carpet in the bathroom is gross because bathrooms are steamy, wet places.

It only needs to happen ONCE, though...

Yeah, that's never happened to me ever. I've had water come up to the top of the pan if there's a blockage, but it's never flowed over the top (I presume this is what people are talking about?). I think our loos must be designed so there's only enough water in the flush to go to the top of the pan and no further. Of course if you flush it again when the water is already that high it's going to overflow, but who would do that?! (yeah, I know: "you'd be surprised...")

We always had carpet in our bathroom when I was a kid. I don't recall the carpet ever getting damp because we also had a bath mat and pedestal mats for the sink and toilet.  Nowadays my bathroom floor has tiles on it but I do miss the carpet. Makes the bathroom a lot warmer in the winter, and it took me an awful long time to get used to places with lino etc in them as most rentals are - it felt cheap and cold.

Dazi

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I've only had two toilet overflows in my experience, and that was with a broken or blocked toilet. I'm more worried about damp from the shower in a carpeted bathroom.

Yeah, I think I've only had an overflow a few times when I was a kid.  Now, if there is even a remote chance, I plunge the heck out of the toilet and it doesn't overflow.  Carpet in the bathroom is gross because bathrooms are steamy, wet places.

It only needs to happen ONCE, though...

Yeah, that's never happened to me ever. I've had water come up to the top of the pan if there's a blockage, but it's never flowed over the top (I presume this is what people are talking about?). I think our loos must be designed so there's only enough water in the flush to go to the top of the pan and no further. Of course if you flush it again when the water is already that high it's going to overflow, but who would do that?! (yeah, I know: "you'd be surprised...")

We always had carpet in our bathroom when I was a kid. I don't recall the carpet ever getting damp because we also had a bath mat and pedestal mats for the sink and toilet.  Nowadays my bathroom floor has tiles on it but I do miss the carpet. Makes the bathroom a lot warmer in the winter, and it took me an awful long time to get used to places with lino etc in them as most rentals are - it felt cheap and cold.

Not everyone has public sewers.  There are many, many people here with septic tanks.  They can literally back up when they get full...if your lucky, it's the bathtub or sink, if you're not so lucky the toilet backs up and overflows.  I've had this happen twice when it gets really, really full or the drain field has gone to poopadities (no pun intended, it just sort of came out that way).
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 06:23:33 AM by Dazi »
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Diane AKA Traska

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I've only had two toilet overflows in my experience, and that was with a broken or blocked toilet. I'm more worried about damp from the shower in a carpeted bathroom.

Yeah, I think I've only had an overflow a few times when I was a kid.  Now, if there is even a remote chance, I plunge the heck out of the toilet and it doesn't overflow.  Carpet in the bathroom is gross because bathrooms are steamy, wet places.

It only needs to happen ONCE, though...

Yeah, that's never happened to me ever. I've had water come up to the top of the pan if there's a blockage, but it's never flowed over the top (I presume this is what people are talking about?). I think our loos must be designed so there's only enough water in the flush to go to the top of the pan and no further. Of course if you flush it again when the water is already that high it's going to overflow, but who would do that?! (yeah, I know: "you'd be surprised...")

We always had carpet in our bathroom when I was a kid. I don't recall the carpet ever getting damp because we also had a bath mat and pedestal mats for the sink and toilet.  Nowadays my bathroom floor has tiles on it but I do miss the carpet. Makes the bathroom a lot warmer in the winter, and it took me an awful long time to get used to places with lino etc in them as most rentals are - it felt cheap and cold.

Not everyone has public sewers.  There are many, many people here with septic tanks.  They can literally back up when they get full...if your lucky, it's the bathtub or sink, if you're not so lucky the toilet backs up and overflows.  I've had this happen twice when it gets really, really full or the drain field has gone to poopadities (no pun intended, it just sort of came out that way).

It's rare, but public sewer systems can do that, too.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

scotcat60

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Quote from: Katana_Geldar on Yesterday at 08:34:39 AM
Scotcat, is that why in the UK you can see carpet in bathrooms?

Carpet in bathrooms?  But, one toilet overflow and.. eep...

Again, carpet in bathrooms was a fashion in the 1970s and 80s. It spoke of comfort, because bathrooms were often cold and unheated. Like Perpetua, we protected this with bath and pedestal mats. then it sort of went out of fashion, like avocado coloured bathroom suites, once considered the bees knees, now people think they are naff. I have never had a problem with mould on a bathroom carpet. Now I have a small square of carpet by the sink which is warmer than tiles. I've never been one to fill the bathroom with clouds of steam, unlke some members of my family, so that helps.

As to toilet overflows, I've had a cistern leak, but my loo is separate from my bathroom, and I dealt with it before there was any damage to the carpet which I have there because, as with the bathroom, it's warmer.

As to hairdryers, in the Uk they are sold with warnings not to use them in bathrooms.

perpetua

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As to hairdryers, in the Uk they are sold with warnings not to use them in bathrooms.

Indeed. It's kind of drummed into us how unsafe it is. Plus there aren't any electrical outlets in bathrooms as per building regulations apart from the 'shaver only' plugs which are a different kind of thing to a normal outlet. No light switches either; they must be either situated outside the bathroom on the wall or be of a pull-cord type if they're in the bathroom itself.

I really don't like bathrooms with lino. Apart from the fact that it's cold and uninviting  (probably because I grew up with carpet) I always worry that the floor would be slippery if water got on it.

That's interesting about the septic tanks and the backup, I hadn't thought of that. Some places here have them too, but usually only those out in the depths of the countryside, I think.

Ereine

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In Finland we just warning on the outlets to not use appliances while showering. Washing machines tend to be in bathrooms so there needs to be electricity too. 

jedikaiti

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Yeah, that's never happened to me ever. I've had water come up to the top of the pan if there's a blockage, but it's never flowed over the top (I presume this is what people are talking about?). I think our loos must be designed so there's only enough water in the flush to go to the top of the pan and no further. Of course if you flush it again when the water is already that high it's going to overflow, but who would do that?! (yeah, I know: "you'd be surprised...")

I can totally see a small child, small toys, much giggling, and a speed that would leave Superman in the dust. Or someone who thinks if they just try enough times, it will eventually work!
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

Margo

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I think carpets in bathrooms is a 70/80s thing - I don't think it's particularly common now. I'm currently househunting, and of the 30+ properties I've looked at, in detail, either in person or on line, I think only 2 had carpeting in the bathroom, and both were very dated in other ways, too.

I've never had a toilet overflow (although I do own a plunger, just in case!)

Sharnita

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Oh, I know, but we're discussing portion sizes and the shock at them by non-USers (or at least I was), and that shocks me. Even our full englishes don't tend to be that huge. I just can't wrap my head around how the restaurants think anyone needs *that* much food in one sitting, especially when it's something you can't box up and take the leftovers home. The wastage must be phenomenal - surely they'd lose less money if they served properly sized portions in the first place, or is the 'bigger is better' attitude so ingrained over there that they won't lure the customers in without it?

In a lot of cases the customer goes with a plan to eat a second meal from the leftovers. The restaurant knows they will get a lot of customers so it is worth it to them. The hashbrowns are cheap for them to make and even the steak isn't exactly "high end". Still, the customer walks away with enough leftovers for a second meal and the restaurant gets a lot of customers.

baglady

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I have carpeting in the bathroom. Kitchen also, until the landlords replaced it this summer with laminate (faux hardwood). It's a big bathroom and well-ventilated with minimal moisture issues, and fortunately -- knock wood -- I've never had the toilet overflow so badly that it affected the carpet. Just the occasional precarious almost-to-the-rim situation.

I would prefer tile or linoleum in there, but if I had to choose between getting rid of the kitchen carpet or the bathroom carpet, I'd choose kitchen. Much more potential for spillage and staining!
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