Author Topic: 16 People On Things They Couldn’t Believe About America Until They Moved Here  (Read 46095 times)

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Diane AKA Traska

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We rarely eat out... we used to go to a diner for breakfast once a month, but haven't in almost a year.  (I wanted to stop until my finger healed from the break, and it just sort of never came up again... I think I'll talk to M about it, maybe we can start doing it again.)

However, we do get take-out and fast food occasionally.
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kherbert05

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About large numbers of different churches in smallish towns. In addition to the reasons already given (different races going to different churches, the astronomical numbers of different denominations in the US, splits in churches) In rural areas the town churches often serve a very very large area. The population could go way up over the weekend, when people came into town for marketing and Sunday Services.

VorFemme can correct me if I'm remembering this wrong but in San Angelo, Texas you still can see what are called sunday houses. Ranchers would build these little one room houses with a kitchen in town. They would come in for Saturday Market, stay overnight in the Sunday House, go to church on Sunday and go back to the ranch Sunday Evening.

This one is from Fredricksburg - the ones I saw in San Angelo were made of field stone.

http://goo.gl/uXq5NQ



As for eating out. I take my own lunch, even though I can get a school lunch for a couple of dollars. If I'm running late I get kolaches from the place around the corner for breakfast. If I don't have left overs I stop and get something from one of a couple of local places on Wednesday when we have faculty meetings. I would rather go to a local hole in the wall hamburger joint than a well known fast food chain.


Growing up we went out to eat every Saturday, and Mom and Dad had date night on Fridays - but Dad's job actually required him to eat at a customer's restaurant every Friday and Saturday evening. We mainly went to local independent places.  Sis and I would confuse non family members - because we often referred to restaurants by the owner's name.
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jmarvellous

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"the average U.S. adult eats 4.8 meals per week in restaurant" (thanks, google)

We probably ate out once a week when we had jobs, sometimes once as a date and once with friends. I also ate in my company cafeteria, where lunches were deducted from my pay, but that was a big perk of the job where the food was amazing and healthy.

Now, as students, we probably eat out twice a month, once with friends and once as a date, and we might pick up coffee or a drink out with friends 2 times a month each. This kind of thing is very much a part of the social fabric around here.

jedikaiti

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Quote
Online money transfer between bank is done via cheque – In USA (at least in PA), whenever I want to transfer money to someone, the bank will issue a cheque and post it to the address of the cheque recipient. The recipient will then cash in the cheque. This procedure will take few days normally and applies even to customers who transfer money to another customers within the same bank.

Is this one true?  That is NUTS!

This isn't my experience.  I have accounts at a credit union, a small local bank, and a major bank; I can transfer funds electronically from any of them, no checks necessary.  I suppose it's possible that some banks don't offer electronic transfers, but I've been able to do it for years.  People in the U.S. do use paper checks a lot more than people in other countries seem to, though.  I don't know why some of us are so attached to the paper.

Me either. I haven't purchased checks for any of my accounts in YEARS.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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VorFemme

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About large numbers of different churches in smallish towns. In addition to the reasons already given (different races going to different churches, the astronomical numbers of different denominations in the US, splits in churches) In rural areas the town churches often serve a very very large area. The population could go way up over the weekend, when people came into town for marketing and Sunday Services.

VorFemme can correct me if I'm remembering this wrong but in San Angelo, Texas you still can see what are called sunday houses. Ranchers would build these little one room houses with a kitchen in town. They would come in for Saturday Market, stay overnight in the Sunday House, go to church on Sunday and go back to the ranch Sunday Evening.

This one is from Fredricksburg - the ones I saw in San Angelo were made of field stone.

http://goo.gl/uXq5NQ



As for eating out. I take my own lunch, even though I can get a school lunch for a couple of dollars. If I'm running late I get kolaches from the place around the corner for breakfast. If I don't have left overs I stop and get something from one of a couple of local places on Wednesday when we have faculty meetings. I would rather go to a local hole in the wall hamburger joint than a well known fast food chain.


Growing up we went out to eat every Saturday, and Mom and Dad had date night on Fridays - but Dad's job actually required him to eat at a customer's restaurant every Friday and Saturday evening. We mainly went to local independent places.  Sis and I would confuse non family members - because we often referred to restaurants by the owner's name.

I remember seeing the owners of Zetner's Steakhouse and Zetner's Daughter's Steakhouse (she ate at a restaurant where I was waiting tables and told ME to comp her table because she'd comped the table for the owner's of the place I was working earlier that week - something that is not up to the waitress & the owner said "she have to pay" - so I got chewed out by Zetner's daughter - not a happy memory of San Angelo in the 1970s for me). 

But the steaks were good...Western Skies was incredible...the memories....

San Angelo knew how to handle a steak, I'll have to admit.  And the steaks at Rowena's Steakhouse were literally as large as the plates (which were small oval meat platters, not plates) - the fries (potato) came on a second plate and it was full, too.  I had my 22nd birthday dinner there, with VorGuy, just after we graduated college the end of May.  Good steaks!
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Elfmama

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I remember seeing the owners of Zetner's Steakhouse and Zetner's Daughter's Steakhouse (she ate at a restaurant where I was waiting tables and told ME to comp her table because she'd comped the table for the owner's of the place I was working earlier that week - something that is not up to the waitress & the owner said "she have to pay" - so I got chewed out by Zetner's daughter - not a happy memory of San Angelo in the 1970s for me). 

But the steaks were good...Western Skies was incredible...the memories....

San Angelo knew how to handle a steak, I'll have to admit.  And the steaks at Rowena's Steakhouse were literally as large as the plates (which were small oval meat platters, not plates) - the fries (potato) came on a second plate and it was full, too.  I had my 22nd birthday dinner there, with VorGuy, just after we graduated college the end of May.  Good steaks!
DH's memory of Zetner's was a bit different.  He ordered a steak very rare.  Waitress tried to argue with him, but took the order.  Steak came out medium well, just barely pink in the middle.  DH sent it back.  Waitress popped out again in just a couple of minutes, slapped the plate down in front of him, then stepped back and crossed her arms.  DH cuts into the steak, and it's immediately obvious that the cook has slapped the steak on the grill, let it go sizzle sizzle sizzle, turned it over and repeated the sizzle sizzle sizzle, and served it up.  DH turns to the waitress and says "Perfect!" and starts chowing down.  And her mouth fell open.  She expected him to send it back again, because basically the man is eating raw meat. 

(This is a perennial arguement with him.  He insists that it's not raw, it's rare.  I say that if it's still cold and red in the middle, that part is RAW.)
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cwm

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(This is a perennial arguement with him.  He insists that it's not raw, it's rare.  I say that if it's still cold and red in the middle, that part is RAW.)

Well, technically you're both not right. It's not rare, it's not raw, it's blue.

http://www.colinmcnulty.com/blog/images/cook-a-steak-blue-rare-medium-welldone.jpg

A blue steak is one that's barely seared on the outside, vaguely lukewarm on the inside.

sparksals

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Just looking at the US menu, they don't even have pavlova for dessert and that's not hard. It's also interesting to see how the menus are structured, there's a strong emphasis on sides on the US one  which doesn't happen here.

Soup and salad? Together? Really?!?

And I was actually asked how Australian that place is, it was the first time I'd ever heard of it so my answer was: "probably not a lot ".


Pavlova is definitely an Australian thing.  My sister lives in Australia and until I went to visit her from Canada, I had never heard of it. 


It is very common in Canada and the US to have soup and salad together.   They are also paired together at restaurants for a 'quick lunch' kind of schtick.  Just because you don't eat soup and salad together doesn't mean it is not done elsewhere and very common... as it is in North America. 




magicdomino

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Soup and salad is the way to go when you want a light meal instead of those huge main dishes. 

MrsJWine

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I like it because it's nice and filling and stays with me (unless it's a thinner soup). AND it tends to be less expensive than other dishes in a restaurant.


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jedikaiti

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(This is a perennial arguement with him.  He insists that it's not raw, it's rare.  I say that if it's still cold and red in the middle, that part is RAW.)

Well, technically you're both not right. It's not rare, it's not raw, it's blue.

http://www.colinmcnulty.com/blog/images/cook-a-steak-blue-rare-medium-welldone.jpg

A blue steak is one that's barely seared on the outside, vaguely lukewarm on the inside.

My friend's term for that is "show it the grill and scare it a little." Coined after her mother sent back a just-seared-on-the-outside tuna steak for being too well done.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

lady_disdain

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Me either. I haven't purchased checks for any of my accounts in YEARS.

Buying checks is something completely alien to me. Here, the bank supplies checkbooks.

And one in reverse. Some people seem to think that the USA is the only large country. I took my parents on a long trip to the USA, from Miami up to Boston mainly by car. More than a few Americans took pity on me and told me it would take a long time. Yup, I was quite aware: we were taking 4 weeks to do it. They insisted that I didn't have an idea of how large the USA is.

Yes, I do. I come from a country that is larger than the continental US. I planned a lot of trips in my life. Cue jaws dropping and people saying "but America is huge." Yes. So are several other countries.

Bethczar

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(This is a perennial arguement with him.  He insists that it's not raw, it's rare.  I say that if it's still cold and red in the middle, that part is RAW.)
A blue steak is one that's barely seared on the outside, vaguely lukewarm on the inside.
And totally delicious!  I generally order my steak "as rare as you will serve it".

Onyx_TKD

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And one in reverse. Some people seem to think that the USA is the only large country. I took my parents on a long trip to the USA, from Miami up to Boston mainly by car. More than a few Americans took pity on me and told me it would take a long time. Yup, I was quite aware: we were taking 4 weeks to do it. They insisted that I didn't have an idea of how large the USA is.

Yes, I do. I come from a country that is larger than the continental US. I planned a lot of trips in my life. Cue jaws dropping and people saying "but America is huge." Yes. So are several other countries.

They thought it would take more than 4 weeks to drive from Miami to Boston?  :o Please, please tell me that you had described weeks worth of sight-seeing plans along the way or that they misheard it as 4 days. My family has many times driven SC to NY over only two days with at least one several-hour sight-seeing stop along the way. Google maps predicts only 22-24 hours driving time for the Miami-to-Boston trip--sure, it's a lot of driving, but not when spread over 4 weeks!

lady_disdain

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I think some just glossed over the time, some reacted  immediately, before I could describe our plans ("oh-oh, another foreigner who thinks she can get from Miami to Boston in a couple of hours"). And, yes, we did all sorts of wonderful things along the way: Savannah, Charleston, Asheville, the Blue Ridge mountains, Civil War sites, Pennsylvania, DC, Baltimore, NYC, etc. But the second part of the trip was by train, since I did not want to drive into NYC.